Author Topic: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus parvus) Varieties  (Read 7705 times)

fruitlovers

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus sp.) Varieties
« Reply #50 on: January 04, 2020, 03:56:01 AM »
I have an isolated kwai muk tree that produces nice large fruits on its own and gets loaded with fruits.

I'd still like to try the scions as cuttings, if feasible. I haven't grafted yet, so I'm not very confident in my skills. That productive tree sounds like elite material indeed.
Difficult to start from cuttings, unless you use rooting hormones and mist house.
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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus sp.) Varieties
« Reply #51 on: January 06, 2020, 11:39:01 PM »
I have an isolated kwai muk tree that produces nice large fruits on its own and gets loaded with fruits.

I'd still like to try the scions as cuttings, if feasible. I haven't grafted yet, so I'm not very confident in my skills. That productive tree sounds like elite material indeed.
Difficult to start from cuttings, unless you use rooting hormones and mist house.

I'm testing the waters now. Took some cuttings off my own little tree (along with some from my Sterculia quadrifida), scored the bark at the base, dipped the moistened bases in powdered rooting hormone, and stuck 'em in potting soil, covered with a big ziplock bag. I don't expect much, but let's see where this goes.

Mango Stein

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus sp.) Varieties
« Reply #52 on: December 14, 2020, 11:46:20 AM »
Updated the title of the post,
Just let me know when the species name has been decided and approved

The Artocarpus taxonomy revision paper was published today. Such papers are purposely put in open-access journals, as the authors believe taxonomic changes to be important enough that the wider community has access and that the adoption is contracted rather than drawn-out (resulting in more confusion). As was anticipated, Kwaimuk or Gwaimuk (formerly Artocarpus nitidus subsp. lingnanensis) was renamed to Artocarpus parvus. I should repeat that it was NEVER A. hypargyreus, so those wanting to "keep this name" because they are "used to it" need to comprehend that this was a case of mistaken identity.

I have already made a thread on true A. hypargyreus, with photos, so you can find that if you are interested. But the gist is that nobody has it in cultivation. It is indeed called something like "white kwaimuk" transliterated from Cantonese, but it is not related (in the same clade) to kwaimuk. There are some other important changes mentioned in the paper.

A. nitidus subsp. nitidus was renamed to A. lamellosus. It is endemic to the Philippines and its common names are butong and kubi (Tagalog).

A. nitidus subsp. humilis was renamed to A. humilis. Common names are Beruni and Selanking

A. nitidus subsp. borneensis was renamed to A. borneensis. Common names are Tampang, Beruni and Selanking

A. nitidus subsp. griffithii was renamed to A. griffithii. Common name is pizhenye kwaimuk, which transliterates from Chinese as "lancelote-leafed kwaimuk"

The paper didn't really cover common names, that was my own addition, though I wish they had. I am of the personal opinion that "kwaimuk" should be one word. The fact is there is no standard of how pidgin Chinese is brought into Western languages. But basically writing kwai muk is the same writing ly chee or long yan. And it is actually gwaimuk properly transliterated, alas this isn't a big deal and is probably too late to correct.

You will find a lot of photographs and species-ID keys in the paper. But this paper just concerns the subgenus Pseudojaca, so all of the jakfruit, breadfruit, marang, pedalai, keledang et cetera are not included (they continue to have their same binomials).

As for when the proposals will be "approved" there is no official measure of this, though it should be mentioned that the lead author Dr Elliot has done most of the annotations for Kew's herbarium, and so the database POWO should be updated to reflect the new names soon. In a couple of years Flora of Singapore Moraceae will come out and the system will be included in that. If someone is a member of the Artocarpus group on FB, please post this paper there. The paper can be downloaded from: https://www.nparks.gov.sg/sbg/research/publications/gardens-bulletin-singapore/-/media/sbg/gardens-bulletin/gbs_72_02_y2020/72_02_06_y2020_v7202_gbs_pg173.pdf
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FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus sp.) Varieties
« Reply #53 on: December 14, 2020, 11:54:47 AM »
Improved Plant Regeneration Method for Artocarpus lakoocha  (seeds i got from Oscar years ago, now a tree with fruits setting, even after 25F, dying back to the ground, now 10ft tall approx, 8yrs old?)

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s42535-019-00041-4/figures/1
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roblack

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus sp.) Varieties
« Reply #54 on: December 14, 2020, 05:23:17 PM »
Any ideas on what this is?



Mango Stein

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus sp.) Varieties
« Reply #55 on: December 14, 2020, 07:22:54 PM »
Any ideas on what this is?



Looks like kwaimuk to me (A. parvus).
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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus hypargyraeus) Varieties
« Reply #56 on: December 15, 2020, 09:43:25 AM »
I have a lot of hope for Kwai muk.  I pick fruit on a Friday to sell Saturday morning, Iím hoping I can make that work with this fruit.

I ate fruit from the tree at Tenom and that really convinced me on the quality.  I have two developing trees that we are trying to shape like we work Jakfruit, not letting them go over about 4 meters.  They do seem to want the drop lower branches and go up.  Iím thinking that with the seed material I got from Tenom that I will snip the tips, starting lower down.  That tree there was very easy to

What you do for you jackfruit tree pruning wise?

skhan

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus parvus) Varieties
« Reply #57 on: April 22, 2022, 06:55:52 PM »
Just wanted to update this thread a little.
Looks like the tree I planted from a 1gal in 2018 is fruiting for the first time.





The tree is like 6ft at it's highest and was growing under the shade of a big Papaya tree until a few months also.
All the graft wood I got from Oscars ended up failing, I used the buddy tape method. I probably need to use the plastic bag method next time. Not as easy to graft as mango for sure.
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Jaboticaba45

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus parvus) Varieties
« Reply #58 on: April 22, 2022, 07:45:28 PM »
This fruit is really good - it tastes like citrus and peach combined. It is also perfectly balanced sweet/tart. It's nice to see the scientific name be cleared up after such confusion in the past. Mine is still pretty small and will need several more years before any hope of fruit. Luckily this thing does great in greenhouses and is pretty cold tolerant.

brian

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus parvus) Varieties
« Reply #59 on: April 22, 2022, 08:05:00 PM »
I just planted one of these in the ground in my greenhouse.  Nice to hear good things about the fruit.   Any idea how long to fruit from seed? 

skhan

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus parvus) Varieties
« Reply #60 on: April 22, 2022, 08:27:10 PM »
Looks like this took 4 years to fruit from a 1ft seedling so maybe around 5 altogether.
That's assuming the fruit holds to maturity.

Some of the fruits I've tried in the past were really sour with not much sweetness to balance it.
The grafted on from Excalibur is really nice though.

The forum member who I got the tree from mentioned the seeds came from Oscar so that sounds promising.
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brian

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus parvus) Varieties
« Reply #61 on: April 22, 2022, 08:42:51 PM »
I didn't know Excalibur had grafted kwai muk, maybe that is new.  When I visited there a few years ago they had only ~1ft seedlings. 

My current seedlings are from Etsy seller, not sure what type they may be.  Are kwai muk typically slow growers?  ou mentioned yours was 6ft in 4-5yrs?

My jackfruit in-ground in-greenhouse reached ~9ft tall in about two years from planting a 1-2ft nursery tree... it grows so fast I have to prune it three times a year.  A slower growing artocarpus would be nice if it falso ruits at small size.

roblack

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus parvus) Varieties
« Reply #62 on: April 22, 2022, 09:57:42 PM »
Ours has gone from about 2 feet to now 6 feet in about 16 months, after being planted in ground.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2022, 10:11:25 PM by roblack »

snowjunky

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus parvus) Varieties
« Reply #63 on: April 24, 2022, 05:56:17 PM »
My kwai muk grew from 3ft in a 3gal pot to 7 ft after one year in the ground.  It was also under a papaya for shade until recently when the papaya broke in half. 
It grew long, but doesn't have many leaves.  I guess it can grow in 8.2pH soil with lots of compost.  I'm not sure it can survive this Phoenix summer without shade.
I got it from toptropicals.  They call it Jesses Creme de la Creme.  It doesn't look grafted and toptropocals doesn't say if it's airlayered or seedling.  The root ball was too big for me to check for that.
I bought some seedling kwai muk from etsy and they grew slowly in cactus mix for a year.  After I up-potted them in regular potting soil last summer they began to decline for some reason.
Maybe they needed more aeration in the soil, but the Jesses Creme de la Creme grew very well in the same regular potting soil.  I'm baffled
Here's what my ugly tree looks like:


« Last Edit: April 25, 2022, 02:56:58 PM by snowjunky »

skhan

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Re: Kwai Muk (Artocarpus parvus) Varieties
« Reply #64 on: June 27, 2022, 04:01:20 PM »




Most of the fruitlets fell off.
Only have a handful left, I'm assuming its normal for the first time fruiting though
It starting to flower again.

I've tasted a few of the aborted fruit on the ground, still sour.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2022, 04:03:44 PM by skhan »
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