Tropical Fruit > Tropical Fruit Discussion

Grow bags

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goosematoose:
I live in a zone 7 climate, with some snow fall during the winter. I was thinking of growing several tropical fruit plants indoors (i.e. banana, citrus, etc.). I wanted to know if I could grow them in grow bags as a long term solution versus a conventional planter. Please advise. thank you.

palingkecil:
I used some grow bags before, because I read that I don't need to trim the root with grow bags.
The pro, of course no root trimming needed, and it is lighter than regular container.
The con, the soil gets dry really quick. With conventional container, I only need to water twice a week. But with the grow bag my plants wilt if I don't water everyday during the summer.
Of course I live in So-Cali with very low humidity and dry intense heat.
It might work better if you have high humidity and no triple digit summer heat.

nana7b:
In my experience grow bags work really well and plants perform better than in conventional plastic containers.

As mentioned they do dry out faster. For some of my really thirsty plants I place a large plastic saucer underneath the container where I can add extra water if needed.

Eventually you will need to take the plant out and prune some roots and top if wanting to keep it small. 

felicebehaviour:
I don't think that using the grow bags will be profitable in your situation. In my opinion, you need to get a good place where you can keep the proper temperature for the plants all year. If you don't want to go this complicated way, you can use the regular thermal stand-up bags from www.interplas.com site. It gonna be enough to keep the proper temperature. Your zone is pretty normal and doesn't have a big temperature change even during winter periods, but anyway, you will lose some plants, so if you are planning to grow for a long period, you definitely will need a covered place.

K-Rimes:
I used to use grow bags, but never will again. They fall apart, the soil gets hydrophobic, watering needs are excessive (2-3x a day for well established plants).

What little growth improvement there is is best applied for tomatoes, peppers, or "annuals" - not permanent fixture plants.

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