Author Topic: Jack Bean for Nematodes  (Read 786 times)

Galatians522

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Jack Bean for Nematodes
« on: May 06, 2022, 10:37:28 PM »
There has been a lot of discussion lately about dealing with root knot nematodes. So, I thought people might be interested in this article. Apparently, Jack Bean seed powder is highly effective at controling nematodes. 1% inclusion in potting soil (by weight) reduced nematoed galling by 98%!

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.researchgate.net/publication/242752702_Soil_Amendment_with_Castor_Bean_Oilcake_and_Jack_Bean_Seed_Powder_to_Control_Meloidogyne_javanica_on_Tomato_Roots&ved=2ahUKEwih-OeAqsz3AhVvrmoFHXuRCQAQFnoECDcQAQ&usg=AOvVaw1uTiG1yMcsJau3lR_tQcDw

According to my calculations that would require an application rate of approximately 4 cups of jack bean seed powder per square foot. Assuming that 1 cubic foot of soil (sand) weighs 100 lbs and that most nematodes inhabit the top 10" of the soil matrix. One would also have applied approximately 1,500 lbs of total nitrogen per acre (most of it presumably slowly available). Assuming that jack bean powder would weigh about the same as chick pea flour and that jack bean seeds are 4.5% nitrogen (equivalent to 29% protein).

There always seems to be a catch...

shot

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Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2022, 10:16:56 AM »
Excellent info!! Even just the nitrogen

Epicatt2

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Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2022, 11:07:51 AM »
Just curious, but have marigolds lost their effectiveness against nematodes?

Shouldn't it still be useful to plant smelly French marigolds around the base of any of the worst affected plants (at least in smaller-sized plots) and later till under the old, bloomed-out marigolds once they've passed their prime, to incorporate some further residual protection into the soil?

Bulk marigold seed should not be all that expensive.

Just pondering marigolds as an alternative option for the smaller fruit grower of whom there are many here on TFF . . .

Paul M.
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Galatians522

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Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2022, 12:00:40 PM »
Just curious, but have marigolds lost their effectiveness against nematodes?

Shouldn't it still be useful to plant smelly French marigolds around the base of any of the worst affected plants (at least in smaller-sized plots) and later till under the old, bloomed-out marigolds once they've passed their prime, to incorporate some further residual protection into the soil?

Bulk marigold seed should not be all that expensive.

Just pondering marigolds as an alternative option for the smaller fruit grower of whom there are many here on TFF . . .

Paul M.
==

I have not researched marigolds much, but I believe they do have an effect. Unfortunately, I think that (like jack bean) they would need to be incorporated into the soil to be effective. This reduces the effectiveness for already established tree crops. I think these types of plants work best as cover crops and prior to planting an orchard.

There are several reasons I have been focusing on jack bean. 1). It has proven highly effective at reducing nematode populations (you will notice that plants in the study varied in effectiveness). 2). It fixes nitrogen in large quantities. Actually, it had the highest reported level of nitrogen fixation of any of the plants that I looked at (3-4 times the level of cowpeas in a year's time). 3). It can be grown without irrigation durring our summer "off season" for vegetable crops. This allows the same space to be used for my garden in the fall. 4). There are some other studies out there showing that jack bean can also reduce other soil pathogens and that it may even be possible to create an organic herbicide form seed extract.

I guess I am just really excited about this particular plant. Lol!

Epicatt2

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Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2022, 03:34:40 PM »
In companion planting studies it was learned that French marigolds, the smellier the hybrid, the better the nematode repellent properties were.  Those properties were from the marigolds' root exudates and also by tilling the spent bloomed-out marigold plants into the soil as green manure so as to provide a bit of residual repellency as the plants decomposed.

This article, which also mentions the painted daisy as repellent, may shed some further light:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/insects/nematode-control-with-plants.htm

OK HTH

Paul M.
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pineislander

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Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2022, 06:15:26 PM »
Great news I harvested about 50 pounds of shelled out Jack Beans this year.

Galatians522

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Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2022, 10:08:33 PM »
In companion planting studies it was learned that French marigolds, the smellier the hybrid, the better the nematode repellent properties were.  Those properties were from the marigolds' root exudates and also by tilling the spent bloomed-out marigold plants into the soil as green manure so as to provide a bit of residual repellency as the plants decomposed.

This article, which also mentions the painted daisy as repellent, may shed some further light:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/insects/nematode-control-with-plants.htm

OK HTH

Paul M.
==

That is interesting. Its good to know that the root exudate has repelent properties.

Galatians522

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Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2022, 11:54:57 PM »
Epicatt2, I dug up this old thread because I found a study showing where marigold was the only cover crop to reduce nematode levels while it was growing. So, it does appear that you were right about it not having to be tilled in as a green manure to be suppressive.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://journals.flvc.org/jon/article/view/66955/64623&ved=2ahUKEwjI77fStsj7AhVNTjABHRTUDLUQFnoECA0QAQ&usg=AOvVaw0WvptO_SiiQhqssdRPWHh1

pagnr

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Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2022, 12:07:55 AM »
How are the nematodes getting into the pot mix ?
Years ago  a family member potted Citrus into river sand and red loam ( the type of red soil you see in outback Australia. Result lots of nematodes on those trees ).
Since then I have used pine bark mixes or the same river sand and coir peat. Have not seen nematodes since in pots.
Solarising soil mixes might be a precursor control for nematodes.

Galatians522

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Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« Reply #9 on: November 25, 2022, 09:05:57 AM »
How are the nematodes getting into the pot mix ?
Years ago  a family member potted Citrus into river sand and red loam ( the type of red soil you see in outback Australia. Result lots of nematodes on those trees ).
Since then I have used pine bark mixes or the same river sand and coir peat. Have not seen nematodes since in pots.
Solarising soil mixes might be a precursor control for nematodes.

I was hoping the study with potted plants could be applied to in ground plants as well.

pagnr

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Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« Reply #10 on: November 25, 2022, 04:53:23 PM »
I was hoping the study with potted plants could be applied to in ground plants as well.

OK please keeps updated on that investigation.

Another possibility in the marigold area is Tagetes minuta as a green manure crop for biomass and a bio-fumigant for control of selected species of nematodes.
There are also some plant species that trap nematodes in their roots.


Galatians522

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Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« Reply #11 on: November 25, 2022, 06:46:05 PM »

OK please keeps updated on that investigation.

There are also some plant species that trap nematodes in their roots.

I can report after this season that the Jack Bean I am growing does form galls on the roots from nematodes. So, I am assuming that its primary effect is from the break down of its plant chemicals.

Interesting that you mention the trapping. I just read an article claiming that radish can be used to reduce nematode levels even though it is susceptible. Apparently, radishes are typically harvested so quickly (28 days) that most nematodes do not have a chance to reproduce (typical life cycle is 3-6 weeks). Upon harvest, many nematodes are removed with the radishes since it is a root crop. It got me thinking that this could be a really fast way to rid a spot of nematodes. Just grow several fast crops of radish, solarize the harvest in bags, and then compost. This could probably be done with any number of crops as long as they were pulled up by the roots in three weeks time or so.

pagnr

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Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« Reply #12 on: November 25, 2022, 08:02:19 PM »
Since radishes are in the Mustard family, the nematode action could also be chemical, as with these Brassicas.
https://www.thelostseed.com.au/mustard-mix-nematode-control
There was a product over here based on mustard seed powder as another method of bio fumigation.

pineislander

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Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« Reply #13 on: November 26, 2022, 10:08:23 PM »

OK please keeps updated on that investigation.

There are also some plant species that trap nematodes in their roots.

I can report after this season that the Jack Bean I am growing does form galls on the roots from nematodes. So, I am assuming that its primary effect is from the break down of its plant chemicals.

Interesting that you mention the trapping. I just read an article claiming that radish can be used to reduce nematode levels even though it is susceptible. Apparently, radishes are typically harvested so quickly (28 days) that most nematodes do not have a chance to reproduce (typical life cycle is 3-6 weeks). Upon harvest, many nematodes are removed with the radishes since it is a root crop. It got me thinking that this could be a really fast way to rid a spot of nematodes. Just grow several fast crops of radish, solarize the harvest in bags, and then compost. This could probably be done with any number of crops as long as they were pulled up by the roots in three weeks time or so.
I hardly ever pull out jack beans because I'm seeking them as nitrogen fixers but am wondering if what you are seeing might be the nodulation rather than galls?

Galatians522

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Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« Reply #14 on: November 26, 2022, 10:28:59 PM »
I hardly ever pull out jack beans because I'm seeking them as nitrogen fixers but am wondering if what you are seeing might be the nodulation rather than galls?

I had a large block that I had planted and noticed a few plants in decline. When I pulled them up, it appeared that there was galling within the root as opposed to on the root as I would have anticipated with nodulation (I did observe some of what I took to be nodulation as well). I ended up pulling all of them out after harvesting a good number of pods and noticed that the majority of the pods were produced by the plants showing little to no galling. Maybe I just had some susceptible specimines in my "landrace?" What do you think?

mangoba

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Re: Jack Bean for Nematodes
« Reply #15 on: November 27, 2022, 12:02:57 PM »
In companion planting studies it was learned that French marigolds, the smellier the hybrid, the better the nematode repellent properties were.


There is even an extract made by this Spanish company: https://www.atlanticaagricola.com/en/products/nemagold/

 

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