Author Topic: Nippon Orangequat - cold hardiness  (Read 712 times)

tedburn

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Nippon Orangequat - cold hardiness
« on: January 14, 2022, 05:32:15 PM »
Tuesday I got an Nippon Orangequat with a really wonderful fruit, 6cm in diameter, wonderful mandarinorange flavour and very juicy, delicious.
I read it could take down to 10° F.
Does anyone cultivate this wonderful plant and what are the expiriences concerning cold hardiness and other specifics of the plant. Thanks Frank


poncirsguy

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Re: Nippon Orangequat - cold hardiness
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2022, 06:51:05 PM »
I am glad your fruit is tasty.  everything I have read is that the fruit is so sour it has no flavor.  Marumi kumquat on Flying dragon properly hardened can go down to 10F with no damage and 0-F with leaf loss.

tedburn

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Re: Nippon Orangequat - cold hardiness
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2022, 01:48:39 AM »
Thanks Poncirusguy, I think there are several cultivars under the name Orangequat, mine is a cross of mandari x meiwa kumquat and so the fruit tastet realy delicious.
But I think hardiness is therefore also limited for planting in ground at my zone 7 place, without more protection.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Nippon Orangequat - cold hardiness
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2022, 04:32:18 AM »
From what I understand, Nippon orangequat is only as hardy as kumquat, which is only a little bit hardier than Satsuma mandarin.

They're edible, but some people complain that they are not as good eating quality inside as Satsuma (or a regular mandarin), and their outside peel is not as edible as a kumquat. That mixing together the traits of both are not really the most desirable thing for being able to enjoy the fruits.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Nippon Orangequat - cold hardiness
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2022, 04:37:07 AM »
But I think hardiness is therefore also limited for planting in ground at my zone 7 place, without more protection.
I am pretty sure Nippon Orangequat is not going to be able to survive zone 7 in Germany without protection.
I remember someone did an experiment and planted a kumquat just outside of Atlanta (US state of Georgia, zone 7b), and even covered the plant with frost cloth, and it did not survive.

poncirsguy

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Re: Nippon Orangequat - cold hardiness
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2022, 10:15:18 AM »
I believe that someone with the 0rangequat tree was on Macophilia or rough lemon roots and those aren't cold hardy so the  tree died because its roots died.  An Orangequat on Flying dragon would have a very good chance in zone 7 with Christmas lights and radiant barrier frost cloth.

mikkel

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Re: Nippon Orangequat - cold hardiness
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2022, 10:28:40 AM »

I am pretty sure Nippon Orangequat is not going to be able to survive zone 7 in Germany without protection.


this is just pure speculation

tedburn

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Re: Nippon Orangequat - cold hardiness
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2022, 03:59:14 PM »
@all, thank you for your comments.
But believe me the fruit was really delicous comparable to a satsuma.
My plan is to take a small twig of the plant and graft in on poncirus and plant it later in ground, but I guess protection and heating in zone 7 will be necessary if temperatures lower than -10 or -12 ° Celsius ( 10° F).

brian

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Re: Nippon Orangequat - cold hardiness
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2022, 04:33:00 PM »
All of the fruit that my Nippon has produced have been bland.  The pulp not very sour, and the rind not very sweet.  Seedy and anyway too large to eat in one bite.  However, I have read other reports that this type is quite nice to eat, so maybe their is some variety for whatever reason.   The fruit in Tedburn's picture looks more like a satsuma to me.  All of my Nippon fruit have been round to egg-shaped, I have never seen one with the slight-pumpkin-shape that is common with mandarins.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2022, 04:37:02 PM by brian »

tedburn

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Re: Nippon Orangequat - cold hardiness
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2022, 07:27:03 PM »
Yes Brian, my fruit looked satsuma like and tasted satsuma/orangelike, lower acid than my satsuma myagawa.
Think I will take a small twig in spring for grafting on citrumelo or poncirus and then will test frosthardiness.

brian

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Re: Nippon Orangequat - cold hardiness
« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2022, 10:08:28 AM »
from the other thread about Dekopan it sounds like some varieties have significant variety.  You should clone yours and propagate it.

I guess it is possible that my orangequat or yours is mislabelled, but the leaves look correct for a kumquat hybrid

tedburn

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Re: Nippon Orangequat - cold hardiness
« Reply #11 on: January 22, 2022, 04:29:20 PM »
Brian, I also think there are several cultivars, because some descriptions of Orangequat dont fit to my plant/ fruit.
I found a description wich fits very good and also the fruit size seems to fit, see the link and go to the description/ picture.
http://mckenzie-farms.com/photo.htm

 

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