Author Topic: Grafting pears  (Read 948 times)

D-Grower

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Grafting pears
« on: February 07, 2024, 01:07:44 PM »
Hello all! I was wanting to inquire whether or not pear grafts are likely to work if your scion wood has already leafed out? If you have experience please let me know.

Thanks! DG
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Oolie

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Re: Grafting pears
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2024, 05:11:59 PM »
If scions are dormant, it's super easy. I have some scions of low chill varieties, what were you looking for?

If you want to use the already leafed out scions, it's much more challenging, but as long as the rootstock is pushing hard, you still may get good results. Try using a plastic bag and moist paper towel inside it to keep the humidity high, as the non-hardened off growth will dry out quickly while the graft is healing. Also make sure to cover that bag in foil or newspaper to prevent the light from frying the tender growth.

Best bet is to get dormant scions however.

D-Grower

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Re: Grafting pears
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2024, 05:27:08 PM »
Thanks for the info! I am on the hunt for low chill varieties. I may have access to some but curious what you might have. Also looking for a variety of other low chill species including apples, prunus, Mulberry, persimmon, and Asian pear.
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mangoba

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Re: Grafting pears
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2024, 08:28:23 PM »
It could work, remove all leaves but I would wait for next winter if that variety broke dormancy. I myself couldn't find yet a good tasting low chill pears.

Oolie

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Re: Grafting pears
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2024, 12:57:04 PM »
Thanks for the info! I am on the hunt for low chill varieties. I may have access to some but curious what you might have. Also looking for a variety of other low chill species including apples, prunus, Mulberry, persimmon, and Asian pear.

Where you are blight resistance should be the number one concern. I planted in Alabama: Shin Li, Dasui Li, Warren, and Potomac.

Of these Warren is the least vigorous and Potomac the most.

For Prunus I planted Florida Glo and Jefferson Green Gage, but I would also plant Inca Plum if available.

There should be no issues with any persimmon, but I'm partial to the pollination variant ones.

I didn't plant mulberries there, but I get plenty of them in SoCal. I will be planting them in WA when I get some, chill hours shouldn't be a consideration for these, but performance in wet weather should. I read somewhere in the Panhandle someone was getting fruit from Morus nigra by specially treating their tree, but I forget if it was by removing diseased leaves or by spraying. Most reports are that nigra is too difficult and instead efforts should be given towards alba and rubra types. My favorite by far of that group is the Frank's yellow, which appears synonymous with Aus green, White Shatoot, Sharahanpur Local, and others.

We got in excess of 600 Chill hours in AL, but I think you should be able to get the Asian pears to fruit, you may be able to get blooms out of Warren and Potomac, it's worth trying, scions are cheap and available online, I do have some spares if unable to locate.

Galatians522

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Re: Grafting pears
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2024, 06:51:30 PM »
Thanks for the info! I am on the hunt for low chill varieties. I may have access to some but curious what you might have. Also looking for a variety of other low chill species including apples, prunus, Mulberry, persimmon, and Asian pear.

Where you are blight resistance should be the number one concern. I planted in Alabama: Shin Li, Dasui Li, Warren, and Potomac.

Of these Warren is the least vigorous and Potomac the most.

For Prunus I planted Florida Glo and Jefferson Green Gage, but I would also plant Inca Plum if available.

There should be no issues with any persimmon, but I'm partial to the pollination variant ones.

I didn't plant mulberries there, but I get plenty of them in SoCal. I will be planting them in WA when I get some, chill hours shouldn't be a consideration for these, but performance in wet weather should. I read somewhere in the Panhandle someone was getting fruit from Morus nigra by specially treating their tree, but I forget if it was by removing diseased leaves or by spraying. Most reports are that nigra is too difficult and instead efforts should be given towards alba and rubra types. My favorite by far of that group is the Frank's yellow, which appears synonymous with Aus green, White Shatoot, Sharahanpur Local, and others.

We got in excess of 600 Chill hours in AL, but I think you should be able to get the Asian pears to fruit, you may be able to get blooms out of Warren and Potomac, it's worth trying, scions are cheap and available online, I do have some spares if unable to locate.

Did you fruit Inca plum in Alabama? What did you use as a pollinator?

Oolie

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Re: Grafting pears
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2024, 10:34:31 PM »
Thanks for the info! I am on the hunt for low chill varieties. I may have access to some but curious what you might have. Also looking for a variety of other low chill species including apples, prunus, Mulberry, persimmon, and Asian pear.

Where you are blight resistance should be the number one concern. I planted in Alabama: Shin Li, Dasui Li, Warren, and Potomac.

Of these Warren is the least vigorous and Potomac the most.

For Prunus I planted Florida Glo and Jefferson Green Gage, but I would also plant Inca Plum if available.

There should be no issues with any persimmon, but I'm partial to the pollination variant ones.

I didn't plant mulberries there, but I get plenty of them in SoCal. I will be planting them in WA when I get some, chill hours shouldn't be a consideration for these, but performance in wet weather should. I read somewhere in the Panhandle someone was getting fruit from Morus nigra by specially treating their tree, but I forget if it was by removing diseased leaves or by spraying. Most reports are that nigra is too difficult and instead efforts should be given towards alba and rubra types. My favorite by far of that group is the Frank's yellow, which appears synonymous with Aus green, White Shatoot, Sharahanpur Local, and others.

We got in excess of 600 Chill hours in AL, but I think you should be able to get the Asian pears to fruit, you may be able to get blooms out of Warren and Potomac, it's worth trying, scions are cheap and available online, I do have some spares if unable to locate.

Did you fruit Inca plum in Alabama? What did you use as a pollinator?

My tree I was going to take scions from was killed by gophers, so it never got grafted.
I think Inca is self-able, but if there's any question of pollination, Santa Rosa has a very long bloom cycle.

 

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