Citrus > Cold Hardy Citrus

Citrumelo

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tedburn:

--- Quote from: Unicyclemike on January 15, 2023, 04:59:48 AM ---Thank you.  Does anyone have any experience with Citrumelo plants that are not grafted or any "citrus hardy" plants that are not grafted

Mike Adams

--- End quote ---

I think there are some members which have experiences with coldhardy citrus, but to receive answers you should ask more detailed what you are interested in. I e.g. I have a Yuzu since 3 winters in ground, froze to earth in winter after a low of - 15 C and has now recovered again or a Dunstan citrumelo seedlings two year old in ground took -13 C this winter - all survived, some with slight damages, others with none, depending on genetics and microclimate of place.

Till:
I can only say that Yuzu was more hardy than Poncirus the last year. Poncirus lost all of its previous growth and had some bark cracks because of late frost. Yuzu only lost its leaves and had no twig dieback at all. The reason will be that Yuzu has a deeper dormancy or needs higher temperature for sapflow.

That is not my own experience but I have read that citrus grafted on Poncirus is not necessarily hardier than on citrus rootstocks because Poncirus induces early growth in spring so that the grafts are sometimes even less hardy than on other rootstocks. For me, that is plausible and fits my observation that Poncirus needs not much warmth in spring in order to grow. I am not sure, however, if we can conclude that trifoliate hybrids are sometimes hardier on their own roots. Real experience shall decide the case, experience that I don't have.

luckyjimi:

--- Quote from: Till on January 15, 2023, 06:56:21 AM ---I can only say that Yuzu was more hardy than Poncirus the last year. Poncirus lost all of its previous growth and had some bark cracks because of late frost. Yuzu only lost its leaves and had no twig dieback at all. The reason will be that Yuzu has a deeper dormancy or needs higher temperature for sapflow.

That is not my own experience but I have read that citrus grafted on Poncirus is not necessarily hardier than on citrus rootstocks because Poncirus induces early growth in spring so that the grafts are sometimes even less hardy than on other rootstocks. For me, that is plausible and fits my observation that Poncirus needs not much warmth in spring in order to grow. I am not sure, however, if we can conclude that trifoliate hybrids are sometimes hardier on their own roots. Real experience shall decide the case, experience that I don't have.

--- End quote ---

What the lower temperature did you notice? I think you have some right but if it was -12deg it is not much for Yuzu.
I have the same problem in spring with P.Trifoliata. Even when is -3/-5 deg in spring in April / May I can lost about 1/3 or more twigs due to bark crack.

Unicyclemike:
I want to make sure I am totally understanding all of this...If you have a Owari Satsuma that was not grafted onto a trifolate and put it in the ground it would probably bloom later because trifolates bloom earlier but it would do as well when cold weather comes.  Do I have this right?

Mike Adams

Nick C:
I have an in-ground citrumelo on its own roots. Made it thru last year with protection when needed. Never got around to covering it up this year and experienced lows of 6F unprotected. Minimal leaf curl right now everything else looks alright



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