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Messages - 1rainman

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1
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Calamansi x Tangelo Hybrid
« on: November 19, 2022, 08:11:51 PM »
Could be stress. A weak seedling that will eventually turn normal. Some hybrids are weak or come out weird too because of distantly related species. Odd enough both inbreeding and crossbreeding (if they are distantly related) can have similar effects. So could be a hybrid or could be a weird seedling.

2
Citrus General Discussion / Re: First time citrus (Beginner)
« on: November 19, 2022, 07:44:57 PM »
A normal potting mix works well. Miracle grow potting soil for instance. It's mostly peat and perlite but pre mixed. This would work well but I'd sprinkle a little sand in it if available. Like 5% sand or something. It doesn't need any special soil though prefers a little more drainage than average.

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Citrus General Discussion / Re: Pomelo / Grapefruit ID
« on: November 14, 2022, 09:29:42 PM »
It looks like a trifoliate x grapefruit (or pommelo) crossed with a grapefruit again. Swingle fruit look like large oranges. Flavor is like orange crossed with grapefruit not too bitter but has a bit too much of that nasty trifoliate taste to be worth eating but almost edible. They aren't quite that large and are orange but a swingle crossed with a pomelo or grapefruit would look like that. Not sayings it's swingle could be a similar cross. I would imagine swingle x grapefruit wouldn't be too bad but depends how much trifoliate flavor.

Could be a sour orange cross which would explain the bitterness. Trifoliate while not sweet isn't that bitter. Just has that bitter off flavor attached to it. But the rind where it's sliced in half looks trifoliate.

It doesn't look like a pure pommelo or pure grapefruit. That would be my theory like 3/4 with 1/4 trifoliate judging by appearances which could also explain the flavor.it does look very similar to swingle just slightly larger and slightly less orange. Swingle has few seeds due to being a hybrid it has low fertility but seeds are possible.

4
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Pomelo / Grapefruit ID
« on: November 14, 2022, 09:26:49 PM »
It looks like a trifoliate x grapefruit (or pommelo) crossed with a grapefruit again. Swingle fruit look like large oranges. Flavor is like orange crossed with grapefruit not too bitter but has a bit too much of that nasty trifoliate taste to be worth eating but almost edible. They aren't quite that large and are orange but a swingle crossed with a pomelo or grapefruit would look like that. Not sayings it's swingle could be a similar cross. I would imagine swingle x grapefruit wouldn't be too bad but depends how much trifoliate flavor.

Could be a sour orange cross which would explain the bitterness. Trifoliate while not sweet isn't that bitter. Just has that bitter off flavor attached to it. But the rind where it's sliced in half looks trifoliate.

It doesn't look like a pure pommelo or pure grapefruit. That would be my theory like 3/4 with 1/4 trifoliate judging by appearances which could also explain the flavor.

5
Citrus General Discussion / Re: experimenting with clay soil in containers
« on: November 07, 2022, 03:06:59 PM »
I use cat litter. Though if I had clay soil I'd just use 5% of that. Only because summer time it's so hot I have to massively water every day and it's bone dry the next day for any plant that fills the container. But I can't go overboard because in cold weather or rainy season it might get water logged. This small amount of clay in the potting soil seems to work well.

6
Citrus General Discussion / Re: experimenting with clay soil in containers
« on: November 05, 2022, 03:48:42 PM »
It would be better to use rocks, sand etc which will be heavy but have good drainage. I put a small amount of clay in my potting mix. Maybe 5% or 10% at most. This keeps it from drying out but pure clay is not good. Of course dirt from the ground probably isn't pure but is not a good choice for citrus. Most plant love to be wet but citrus does not. Mulch also is not good on citrus most of the time because it stays too damp.

7
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: cold hardy lemon and lime
« on: November 04, 2022, 02:21:00 PM »
You are better off with a sour orange which you can use like a lemon but is much more cold hardy

8
Pierce is in California too. Not supposed to export plants out of the country without special permission because of disease. Limited to seeds. In many cases can't even ship out of state.

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Citrus General Discussion / Re: experimenting with clay soil in containers
« on: November 02, 2022, 05:55:39 AM »
Citrus doesn't like soggy roots. Trifoliate I don't know it's from a different climate.

10
I found a whole field of the second type. No fruit. Maybe wrong time of year maybe not old enough though there were a few large trees. I suspect this is a cross of sour orange with grapefruit maybe something else. The ones they cut down that had fruit were slightly sour but not extremely so. You could eat them but not great. Few seeds no trifoliate flavor. Disease resistant obviously. I would rate them about the same sourness as a grapefruit but with orange flavor and smell. Fruit looks like ugli fruit but a bit smaller. leaves smell like an orange. I would guess it could be a tangelo crossed with a sour orange. Though it has bred with itself to produce the fields of trees.


11
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Confused about caring for a potted meyer
« on: October 30, 2022, 06:37:38 PM »
I never prune citrus. Once it reaches its max height ha fly grows at all. Pretty easy to grow. Make sure it doesn't get too dry like any other plant. Make sure there's no bugs eating it. It's all common sense.

12
Depends on the root stock used. A more cold tolerant root stock will increase cold tolerance of the whole plant. That being said there is usually some minor loss of vigor or drawback to grafts but it varies and not enough to matter. Self rooted cuttings are smallest and less vigorous than grafts or seedlings

13
I would imagine you could get all sorts of different orange seeds or tangelos and such and plant about 200 you would probably end up with a disease resistant one. That's what happens in the woods. Only the strong survive. Besides that they seem stronger from seed generally than grafted or rooted. But they keep tearing down the woods and building stuff.

Unfortunately I have found what appear to be beautiful orange trees and bit into them and they taste like a lemon. Sour orange. I also rarely see citrus in people's yards anymore. The virus wiped them out.

This variety I found in the park would be good to cross with sugar bell in an attempt to improve the quality while maintaining disease resistance. Even not considering disease it's growing well in the woods which is tough. They cut it back a lot to keep it off the trail. I will look if any of the other disease resistant variety are still around in the parks. They cut everything down. Same wild my wild grapes growing in the park they cut them back a few years ago.

14
There's one green not even half ripe fruit. I found one that was damaged or something but seeds appeared ripe. Seeds are skinny compared to normal. It looks exactly like a typical orange.

15
Here is a version of seeds reverting to wild but I was told on here that doesn't happen. So maybe this crossed with some kind of root stock like swingle.

This tree grew from a seed. Someone ate an orange and spit the seeds out 20 years ago. The tree is healthy while others in the area fade from greening or similar viruses. Tree and leaf looks like an orange. Oranges are full of seeds. Like 100 seeds inside which is the biggest negative. Orange looks normal on the outside. Tastes sweet, good flavor. Very slight trifoliate off flavor. But to put in perspective people pick these and eat them. They are less good than normal oranges but good. Tree is not thorny. Tall shade tree like which is how citrus grows from seed where they are shorter and bushier from cuttings.

I snagged some seeds off an unripe fruit today. Since everyone picks them they are hard to.get.



16
Honey bell is my favorite. Tangelo.

17
We have sugar bell. It is more vigorous than most. Still a baby. Unharmed by a hurricane. Appears disease free but not nearly as healthy as swingle and sour orange. Even sugar bell has some small suceptibility. Swingle, trifoliate etc has zero disease basically.

There is a wild orange that is edible growing in the park. Not the greatest tasting but edible. It's sweet not sour barely noticeable off taste maybe some trifoliate in it's background. It has been there as long as I remember grew from a seed. Full of seeds. It is totally disease resistant. Maybe it's some kind of hybrid. I might get seeds if I have a chance.

They should cross a Dunstan grapefruit with a really good red grapefruit maybe get a good disease resistant cold hardy grapefruit.

There was another ugli fruit looking type of orange growing wild again edible but not great but totally different from the first one. Was a field of them in the park but they cut them down. Totally disease and cold resistant. There was also a really good grapefruit tree growing wild. It all might be gone now.

18
Citrus Buy, Sell, & Trade / Greening resistant seeds
« on: October 20, 2022, 05:16:37 PM »
Still trying to get orange or grapefruit seeds that may be greening resistant. Dunstan grapefruit, trifoliate hybrids that taste good, sugar bell seeds etc

19
I once had tiny almost invisible slugs feeding on my citrus. Neem oil cleared them up. I also sprayed the top of the soil

20
Not dropping below 50 is pushing it for peaches. Florida peaches taste great and do well here. They are a bit smaller than traditional peaches. We may have years without a freeze but we have a good number of nights in the 40s. You can always plant them and try.

21
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Citrus issues
« on: October 14, 2022, 06:15:10 PM »
Symptoms could be nitrogen deficiency. Either way a good all full spectrum fertilizer will work. You could also spray with neem oil. Any insects or fungus feeding on it should be killed by neem oil sometimes that can contribute to the problem.

Grapefruit looks alright there but lack of energy in the tree will contribute to fruit being aborted or small. Could be some mildew or fungus or insects eating sap or low nutrients in soil or a combination.

22
Weird. When in doubt spray with neem oil. Should kill any fungus or bugs. Though I like to spray the leaves off with a hose a few different days or get some good rain after spraying with neem oil so it's not sitting on the tree for too long.

23
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: My citrus collection [EU - Antwerp]
« on: October 13, 2022, 05:01:50 PM »
In my experience this Shelly sand is junk for growing stuff other than cactus and similar plants like pineapple. But a small amount of it mixed with potting soil or compost plants love it.

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Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: My citrus collection [EU - Antwerp]
« on: October 13, 2022, 03:29:53 PM »
Poncirus is used as root stock and does well here. I grew my Meyer lemon in Cincinnati in miracle grow potting soil nothing special though I fertilized it.

25
Cold Hardy Citrus / Re: My citrus collection [EU - Antwerp]
« on: October 12, 2022, 09:17:39 PM »
Citrus like to dry out between watering they don't like soggy roots. So it's not a problem if they get really dry for a couple days. Good drainage is good for them. Though they can take a lot of water as long as they get to dry out for a bit. Its more common to over water them instead of them drying out. It's hard to dry them out too much because they are built to keep moisture with thick leaves and such.

Shells are almost entirely calcium carbonate. 99.9% will stay in the shell so crushed shell is almost the same as sand but a tiny amount of calcium will leak out which is good but you don't have to worry too much about it affecting salts, ph or being too much because it's small. But almost impossible for citrus to get too much calcium.

Bone meal will release a lot more calcium and other nutrients as it rots and of course fertilizer with micro nutrients should have calcium. Not sure why citrus like it so much. Never heard of it with other plants other than trace amounts. Here in Florida the river water, tap water etc has a lot of calcium due to the shells and such. It makes for really good soil for citrus. Florida had the best oranges in the world until the greening.

Though shells are alkaline. A small amount shouldn't significantly change the soil. Pure sand is neutral ph though a lot of sand are alkaline due to shells or minerals mixed in them.

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