Citrus > Cold Hardy Citrus

cold hardy citrus in full soil in greenhouse

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kumin:
If trees only need short-term intermittent protection, they could be planted under a skeletal framework, then only covered when then need arises. Having a durable skeleton would provide rigid protection against snow and wind. Having removable cover materials would allow for all the ventilation needed. 

incubator01:

--- Quote from: maesy on February 21, 2021, 01:49:23 PM ---Why don't you plant them outside and just cover them for the occasionally cold nights you can get?

--- End quote ---

First of all not every part of my garden is for me alone, that's why I have a greenhouse. This means I also cannot plant them outside and build a rigid construction around it, because the heavy wind in january / february would blow it away if these parts are removable. (Yes even the roof of my garage got lifted by the wind once)

Second, it rains a lot here, when it does, it rains for 3 weeks pretty much non stop. Any citrus would drown in it. No matter how well draining the garden soil would be.

poncirsguy:
incubator01  Are you near a bridge to far.  Does your kumquat fall under the name of Nagami.  Nagami kumquats handle high heat very well. A picture of an 8 year old seed grown Nagami kumquat I gave to a friend 7 ears ago


incubator01:

--- Quote from: poncirsguy on February 21, 2021, 08:35:51 PM ---incubator01  Are you near a bridge to far.  Does your kumquat fall under the name of Nagami.  Nagami kumquats handle high heat very well. A picture of an 8 year old seed grown Nagami kumquat I gave to a friend 7 ears ago



--- End quote ---

No, it's latin name is Fortunella Margarita.
That plant looks very nice, I'm also growing a few kumquat from seed, just to see what it will do in many years :)

incubator01:

--- Quote from: poncirsguy on February 21, 2021, 08:35:51 PM ---incubator01  Are you near a bridge to far.  Does your kumquat fall under the name of Nagami.  Nagami kumquats handle high heat very well. A picture of an 8 year old seed grown Nagami kumquat I gave to a friend 7 ears ago



--- End quote ---

Sorry for the extremely late reply but I have to correct my previous response.
The seller does label my kumquat as Nagami.
And since I recently noticed that one of the 2 is starting to lose a lot of leaves because of the many winds (I do place them behind a wall when sunny ot get the sun or under a patio when windy/storm etc but no matter what, both locations seem to bother the kumquat wind-wise.
One of them is in my greenhouse and is literally enjoying himself like hell (growing new branches, leaves, riping fruits etc), the other one in a bigger pot (yes I know, the pot is too big but I take care to prevent root rot) is outside on either of mentioned locations.
But the past weeks we have very bad rainy windy weather with thunderstorms.
So I am heavily considering moving that one to my greenhouse too in the future.

The following website ( https://www.plantfoodathome.com/kumquat-tree/ ) mentions the nagami can handle 38+ C ( 100+ degrees F) so if that is true, then I think it's better to move him inside the greenhouse.

Again sorry for not figuring this out sooner :(

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