Citrus > Citrus General Discussion

Citrus: nutrient schedule?

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Mark in Texas:

--- Quote from: Guanabanus on February 26, 2014, 09:37:34 PM ---The dark green spots against the yellow are probably symptomatic of the foliar fertilizer sprays.

--- End quote ---

Agreed.  I have used Southern Ag with absolutely no success.  They're on Flying Dragon though which is notorious for shutting down in the winter and at the top of the rootstock list regarding micros deficiencies.   Give me sour orange any day, it always promotes dark green leaves with a minimum of inputs.

Mark

Millet:
A great many commercial citrus growers use 6-6-6, 8-8-8 or 10-10-10 because they are readily available, cheap, and can be purchased in bulk.   Citrus trees absorb nutrients from the soil in the ratio of 5-1-3. In other words for every 5 parts nitrogen, the tree's root system will absorb 1 part phosphorous and 3 parts potassium. Obviously, in cases of over dosage or deficiency of one or more elements this ratio must be changed to a more appropriate one. Using a fertilizer with a 5-1-3 ratio such as peters 25-5-15 with minors, is especially good for trees growing in containers. I use this ration on both my container and in ground trees - Millet

Mike T:
Applying fertilizers immediately after harvest and the subsequent major yearly prune is normal in warm climates that allow it. A second lighter application around the drip line is alright  when fruit are small but chlorides in some citrus mixes are not good. I reckon the second application is best being a more natural blend like blood an bone, manure or dynamic lifter due to soil health benefits. A 20:6:14 brew cumulative with all applications is great. A thick mulch layer away from the trunk is also great and improves uptake. Soil health is different from the nutrient status of soils and just as important.

You need to check your soil type and even plant foliage to see what micros to use and think if they are also in your NPK blend. Less is more with fertilizers.

Mark in Texas:

--- Quote from: Millet on April 22, 2014, 09:20:46 PM ---Using a fertilizer with a 5-1-3 ratio such as peters 25-5-15 with minors, is especially good for trees growing in containers. I use this ration on both my container and in ground trees - Millet

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Found it for $53/25 lb. shipped, but why do you think Jack came up with the 20-10-20 in the Citrus FeED line?

Millet:
Mark In The Great State Of Texas,  Jack's 20-10-20 though not the very best formula for citrus, is really not all that bad.  Citrus like high nitrogen and potassium, and just little phosphorus. 20-10-20, a 2-1-2 ratio fertilizer, offers both high N & K with too much P.   Jacks 25-5-15 W/TM is a relative new formulation of Jacks (Peters Company).  Jacks main customers are the nursery trade, and not citrus.  As said above, research shows that citrus absorb nutrients from the soil in a 5-1-3 ratio, Meaning for every 5 parts N, the tree will absorb 1 part phosphorous and 3 parts potassium.  Therefore, Jacks 25-5-15 is  a 100 percent  correct balanced fertilizer, especially for container citrus trees. If you would like to read further about citrus's 5-1-3 ratio, you will find it in the citrus text book titled "The Genus Citrus" written by Dugo and Giacomo.  - Millet

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