Author Topic: germinate seeds in coco coir  (Read 427 times)

incubator01

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germinate seeds in coco coir
« on: August 13, 2021, 10:52:52 AM »
Since coco coir (or coco peat) is used frequently for rooting citrus cuttings, I was wondering if this medium can be used as well to germinate citrus seeds, instead of using traditional seeding soil. The reason I would like to switch is because apparently the coco peat allows for much better root development, aeration etc though once the seedling is developed enough I will repot it in a different mix, I just wanted to know if it is good for germinating seedlings and growing them there the first few (2 - 3) months.

pagnr

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Re: germinate seeds in coco coir
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2021, 06:03:04 PM »
Overall coir is regarded to have a good balance between air holding and water holding. It can be very high in K potassium, so it may be easier to source an amended product, with added Ca and Mg and or other trace elements or pH balanced to a desired range. Coir comes in various grades, fine to coarse, so not all at either end would be suitable for Citrus seeds.
Coir is now used in vegetable seedling punnets and plugs, for lettuce etc. These plants have fibrous shallow roots. Citrus seedlings develop via taproots, and this root can be well down into a pot, with not as much showing on top.
In any pot medium, the height of the pot is very important. In the case of Citrus, the taproot will be well into the saturated zone in a shallow pot, compared to what would happen in a tall pot with the exact same medium. In a tall pot the saturated zone will be lower down, and the air holding balance will actually increase.
Apart from air holding and water holding, you probably need to consider the rate of the media surface drying. This could depend on temperature, season, use of grow lights etc.

You could do some trials with supermarket lemon seeds etc, before you commit any more valuable seeds.

incubator01

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Re: germinate seeds in coco coir
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2021, 04:42:29 AM »
hmm, well I want to grow poncirus rootstock seeds and since i read an article coco peat was used more for faster seed growing, i though why not.
But by the sound of it it doesn't seem to be such a wise idea, so maybe i'll do part of them with that and part of them with traditional seeding soil.
I was going to use fine coco peat that is compressed into large bricks that I have to soak in water and end up with 10 liter of coco peat or so.
I do know this medium is great for rooting citrus cuttings so that's why it peaked my interest for seedlings too.
And since it's poncirus I cannot add Ca, it doesn't tolerate it.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2021, 04:58:58 AM by incubator01 »

pagnr

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Re: germinate seeds in coco coir
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2021, 06:25:57 AM »
Personally I use 33 % coir and 67 % coarse sand for seed raising.

"And since it's poncirus I cannot add Ca, it doesn't tolerate it."
I'm not sure I would go as far as that, I don't think it's anything like an acid loving plant. I think it can handle normal pH range.

incubator01

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Re: germinate seeds in coco coir
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2021, 07:44:02 AM »
Personally I use 33 % coir and 67 % coarse sand for seed raising.

"And since it's poncirus I cannot add Ca, it doesn't tolerate it."
I'm not sure I would go as far as that, I don't think it's anything like an acid loving plant. I think it can handle normal pH range.

It's not about the pH , its more that poncirus itself cannot tolerate calcium, I found this on an article and was told before by other citrus growers. I could kill the poncirus by adding calcium frequently.

pagnr

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Re: germinate seeds in coco coir
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2021, 06:45:38 PM »
I'm not aware of that. I don't alter my fertiliser or soil mix fertiliser depending on the rootstock seedlings, or the rootstock under the scion.
I have not noticed that any Poncirus have been killed outright.
Most Citrus fertilisers are general, not based on the different rootstocks. I am pretty sure Citrus growers apply Calcium for fruit production.
They may moderate it for groves on trifoliata rootstock ??
The chosen soil type that trifoliata rootstocks are in, might influence the total result of the applied calcium ?? pH controls nutrient availability.
What you say is still interesting, I might try some trifoliata seed in a lower Ca mix to see if they germinate any better.


incubator01

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Re: germinate seeds in coco coir
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2021, 09:56:55 AM »
I do think I'm going to mix the coco fibers with seeding soil instead of using it pure, seems likethat may prove better.

But the youtube videos that mention rooting citrus cuttings in coco fiber/peat is much better, is that a true fact or is there something they forget to tell?
Because my cuttings take ages to root.
I use rooting hormones, a special rooting hormone mist spray, indirect sunlight, seeding soil atm and plastic foil to maintain moisture levels and of course a warm environment.
(sorry this second part should probably belong in a different topic but it's the last thing i swear :) )

pagnr

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Re: germinate seeds in coco coir
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2021, 05:48:22 PM »
rooting citrus cuttings in coco fiber/peat is much better, is that a true fact or is there something they forget to tell?

The media requirements for seeds and cuttings aren't exactly the same. If you use the same media for both, the water and humidity requirements aren't the same.
Citrus seeds are planted 1 cm deep, the surface shouldn't dry out too much, and they grow down into the pot over time
Cuttings immediately go deeper into the pot, the moisture zone needs to be lower down for water uptake, but not cause rot.
Some people seal up a cutting in moist mix with a plastic bag over it, and leave it till it flushes.

 

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