Author Topic: Two plants out of one seed - are they different?  (Read 253 times)

Vlk

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Two plants out of one seed - are they different?
« on: August 20, 2021, 08:14:00 AM »
Hi there, I've got two seedlings that come from a single seed of Hamlin orange variety. I've read somewhere that very often, one of the seedlings out of a polyembryonic seed is true to seed, so in this case, a Hamlin orange, and the other is a hybrid - mix of the plant from which the pollen came and mix of the Hamlin variety. I see that one of the seedlings has a slightly different growth - it is more gnarly/twisted, it grew a second branch very soon after germinating and it has thorns. The other one grows straight up and it is much taller and looks very "orderly" compared to the other one. :D It also doesn't have thorns. So I take it that the thornless seedling is true Hamlin whereas the other one will be a hybrid?

Also how long would you say it takes for the Hamlin to start bearing fruit from seed without being grafted? What is your experience?
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kumin

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Re: Two plants out of one seed - are they different?
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2021, 08:22:41 AM »
If the 2 seedlings remain distinct in form, one may be zygotic. The fact that there are 2 embryos from one seed almost guarantees one is a nucellar clone of the parent. On very rare occasions there are twin zygotic embryos, but only very rarely.

Vlk

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Re: Two plants out of one seed - are they different?
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2021, 09:12:04 AM »
If the 2 seedlings remain distinct in form, one may be zygotic. The fact that there are 2 embryos from one seed almost guarantees one is a nucellar clone of the parent. On very rare occasions there are twin zygotic embryos, but only very rarely.
So do you think the one with the thorns is the zygotic one? I never grew Hamlin orange, so I have no idea how it looks like.
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kumin

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Re: Two plants out of one seed - are they different?
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2021, 09:52:53 AM »
Since nucellar embryony "resets" the seedlings to a fully juvenile state, either nucellar, or zygotic embryos could produce thorny seedlings. However, if the pollen parent of the zygotic seedling is excessively thorny, the likelihood of it being the more thorny seedling should be greater.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2021, 11:24:40 AM by kumin »

Millet

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Re: Two plants out of one seed - are they different?
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2021, 10:30:01 AM »
It will take approximately 8 years + or - until a seedling orange begins to fruit.

Vlk

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Re: Two plants out of one seed - are they different?
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2021, 06:07:17 PM »
Thank you for your responses, I appreciate it! I am curious what kind of fruit will each of the seedlings produce. :)
Durian & avocado lover

 

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