Author Topic: how to rescue heavily stressed citrus trees?  (Read 340 times)

incubator01

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how to rescue heavily stressed citrus trees?
« on: September 08, 2021, 12:50:41 PM »
So in my previous topic I already mentioned oscar tintori sending me an overwatered pursha, by now it dropped most of its leaves but it's stable.
However their kaffir limes (one in a 20cm pot and one in a 30 cm pot) also had signs of overwatering but not as bad, however after repotting they got so stressed they dropped a lot of leaves and  some fruit and most of their leaves looked weird from the start, kinda like they were malformed.
pictures:







I did the following when these arrived, unboxed, let them settle in hte shade for a few days, repotted in a half peat half turface soil mix which drains really well and is good aerated, then put it against a wall that has the morning sun only, so they get 6 hours of sun but not the warmer afternoon sun, just about untill 13:00h

however at first it was kinda cloudy anyway so they could easily get used to it. Despite not being hit by hot sun yet, they started dropping a lot of leaves, and I only watered them once until the water started dripping out (happened very soon so that was good), the soil is still moist enough, I fed them like  I was told to but something in these branches looks off, is it me or is this tree afflicted with dying branches? the roots looked fine though, when I washed them out they were light in color.
I know Italy has had a heat wave so I'm aware they must have been under a lot of stress there but I really wish I knew how I can prevent these from dying.
Currently we're having a very hot sunny day so I did put them in the shade because that would do a lot of damage. Misting them with rain water doesn't help in revitalizing the leaves either :(

Especially now that autumn is approaching, they'll become dormant in october/november but if they're not doing well this usually means they won't survive.

I'm kinda at a loss here.
The only plant that is doing extremely well and had no stress at all was the poncirus I ordered from them, didn't drop a single leaf at all and has beautiful branches :3

Millet

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Re: how to rescue heavily stressed citrus trees?
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2021, 04:26:28 PM »
The tangled leaves certainly show symptoms of insect damage most likely done when they were young tender new leaves.  The damage was probably done by an insect called a thrip.  Thrip pierce the leaf surface and suck out the internal juices.  After the new leaves firm up thrips will not harm them much.  To keep young leaves from this harm, spray all new flushes with a horticultural oil/water solution (40 grams HO/gallon water) in the morning ,every two days.  Doing this the leaves grown into healthy firm foliage.  One could also use a soap solution or a neem solution,. 

incubator01

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Re: how to rescue heavily stressed citrus trees?
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2021, 05:16:42 PM »
The tangled leaves certainly show symptoms of insect damage most likely done when they were young tender new leaves.  The damage was probably done by an insect called a thrip.  Thrip pierce the leaf surface and suck out the internal juices.  After the new leaves firm up thrips will not harm them much.  To keep young leaves from this harm, spray all new flushes with a horticultural oil/water solution (40 grams HO/gallon water) in the morning ,every two days.  Doing this the leaves grown into healthy firm foliage.  One could also use a soap solution or a neem solution,.

Well shortly after it was transplanted I did spray it with a neem + soap based product against insects, but only once. however it did not seem to help much.
As I said, the plant already looked in poor shape upon arrival but like with the pursha, the seller claims it'll be fine.
I find it a shame to pay 90 EUR for a plant that is unhealthy, they have all the equipment to keep them in good health and they did spray something on it but apparently too late.

All the leaves that fell off, both dried out and fresh ones had no insects on it though, and thrips are those tiny green bugs so I should have noticed them before because last year I saw them on my pepper plants.

The thing is that it's not just new leaves that fall off, bigger ones too. even 2 fruits fell off today :(

sea4

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Re: how to rescue heavily stressed citrus trees?
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2021, 05:22:01 PM »
The tangled leaves certainly show symptoms of insect damage most likely done when they were young tender new leaves.  The damage was probably done by an insect called a thrip.  Thrip pierce the leaf surface and suck out the internal juices.  After the new leaves firm up thrips will not harm them much.  To keep young leaves from this harm, spray all new flushes with a horticultural oil/water solution (40 grams HO/gallon water) in the morning ,every two days.  Doing this the leaves grown into healthy firm foliage.  One could also use a soap solution or a neem solution,.
Thank you, I did not realize the life cycle of the thrip was so short. I have not been spraying frequently enough!

incubator01

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Re: how to rescue heavily stressed citrus trees?
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2021, 06:10:12 PM »
The problem is that even touching, spraying will cause some leaves to drop as well, even healthy looking ones.

CanadianCitrus

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Re: how to rescue heavily stressed citrus trees?
« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2021, 08:02:29 PM »
In my humble experience, if the leaves are falling easily, they are finished either way. I am struggling with my young growth being damaged by pests as well. It hurts to see the damage but we are all playing the long game with our citrus trees.

Millet

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Re: how to rescue heavily stressed citrus trees?
« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2021, 08:59:58 PM »
Incubator like I wrote above, the damage you see in your twisted leaves, was done long ago when the flush was still new young tender leaves.  Now that they have  matured into firm dark green leaves, you do not have to worry about thrip damage.  Your leaves will remain in their twisted present condition for the rest of their lives (citrus leaves have a life spay of 18 to 24 months).  However if the next flush is properly taken care of they will develop just fine.

As to leaves falling at the slightest touch, the problem is in the container
« Last Edit: September 09, 2021, 09:46:17 AM by Millet »

incubator01

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Re: how to rescue heavily stressed citrus trees?
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2021, 02:33:29 AM »
Incubator like I wrote above, the damage you see in your twisted leaves, was done long ago when the flush was still new young tender leaves.  Now that they have  matured into firm dark green leaves, you do not have to worry about thrip damage.  You leaves will remain in their twisted present condition for the rest of their lives (citrus leaves have a life spay of 18 to 24 months).  However if the next flush is properly taken care of they will develop just fine.

As to leaves falling at the slightest touch, the problem is in the container

Well I'm clueless then.
I tried every soil mix of which this one seemed best, but if this one is also considered bad then I'm just dumping the next one in plain universal potting soil which seems to work well with my aunt...
I'm tired of trying to do the right thing and losing the fight over and over again.

When i flushed the roots, all clay was gone, so no obstruction is left. The roots looked healthy yellow/ golden.


Millet

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Re: how to rescue heavily stressed citrus trees?
« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2021, 09:53:32 AM »
From reports that I have read by growers using a 50/50 Turface-MV and peat, and growers using the 5-1-1 mix are having success.  I presently have all my container trees growing in the 5-1-1 mix.  However, just yesterday I purchased a 50- lb. bag of Turface-MVP and will be planting a Ginger Lime in the 50/50 Turface/peat mix for evaluation.  I've hear good reports on that blend.

incubator01

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Re: how to rescue heavily stressed citrus trees?
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2021, 10:58:38 AM »
From reports that I have read by growers using a 50/50 Turface-MV and peat, and growers using the 5-1-1 mix are having success.  I presently have all my container trees growing in the 5-1-1 mix.  However, just yesterday I purchased a 50- lb. bag of Turface-MVP and will be planting a Ginger Lime in the 50/50 Turface/peat mix for evaluation.  I've hear good reports on that blend.

So did I here in this forum from other users, that is why I planted these kaffir limes in the 50/50 Turface and peat mix. For now they're still in shade and until they're not recovering I do not put them in the sun.
How many weeks does it usually take untill they recover from transplant shock?
Do note that I washed the clay off the roots with a hose, even though I saw no roots being damaged, the very fine roots might have been.

 

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