Author Topic: Multiple rootstock grafting  (Read 538 times)

SanDiegoCherimoya

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Multiple rootstock grafting
« on: June 05, 2023, 06:16:23 PM »
Anyone have a good reference on how to properly multiple rootstock graft? I tried this method in the picture attached and they failed. Looking for advice on how to do it correct.

Thanks,
Doug


Jaboticaba45

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2023, 07:22:37 PM »
Sometimes it doesnít work out, I canít see clearly, but did you cut to cambium on both rootstocks?


A lot of times itís practice. Ensure good cambium contact and keep on for at least a month. Zip ties can help secure them too if the wood is not too soft.
Check out this double rootstock jabo graft I did.

SanDiegoCherimoya

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2023, 07:35:56 PM »
Sometimes it doesnít work out, I canít see clearly, but did you cut to cambium on both rootstocks?


A lot of times itís practice. Ensure good cambium contact and keep on for at least a month. Zip ties can help secure them too if the wood is not too soft.
Check out this double rootstock jabo graft I did.

Thanks this helps a lot.

TropicalFruitHunters

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2023, 12:02:01 AM »
There are gobs of videos out there, just got to keep digging.  Tons of different methods as well.  Makes for some interesting viewing.  Just make sure there is no tension on the graft and don't be in a hurry to remove the wrap to peek.  I've tried a few methods, but an approach-type graft leaving the top on the seedling works well.  If it fails, neither seedling or main tree is normally harmed.

Epiphyte

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2023, 12:48:41 AM »
here are a couple of mine...



left is cherimoya and soursop, right is garcinia intermedia and sp. pacuri.

you can't tell from the pic, but the cut went halfway, or nearly so, into each seedling.  and the cut was quite long.  i don't have any immediate plans to decapitate any of the seedlings.

i took that pic a couple months ago, all the seedlings are doing well, but not equally so.  the cherimoya is growing faster than the soursop even though they are in a greenhouse.  if i decapitated the cherimoya would the soursop grow faster?  what if the cherimoya is allocating a good chunk of its energy to the development of the soursop's roots?  i'm probably just going to nip the cherimoya in the bud and continue to do so until the soursop catches up.

SanDiegoCherimoya

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2023, 11:09:58 AM »
here are a couple of mine...



left is cherimoya and soursop, right is garcinia intermedia and sp. pacuri.

you can't tell from the pic, but the cut went halfway, or nearly so, into each seedling.  and the cut was quite long.  i don't have any immediate plans to decapitate any of the seedlings.

i took that pic a couple months ago, all the seedlings are doing well, but not equally so.  the cherimoya is growing faster than the soursop even though they are in a greenhouse.  if i decapitated the cherimoya would the soursop grow faster?  what if the cherimoya is allocating a good chunk of its energy to the development of the soursop's roots?  i'm probably just going to nip the cherimoya in the bud and continue to do so until the soursop catches up.

The plant on the the left, is that a whip and tongue at the bottom of your graft?

Epiphyte

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2023, 05:02:49 PM »
The plant on the the left, is that a whip and tongue at the bottom of your graft?
no, that's the curvy base of the cherimoya.  the graft starts just above the curvy base and goes to just below the leaves. 

haha words are hard.  i was going to be 100% unlazy and show you from scratch, but then i decided to be 10% unlazy and show you some closer pics.  here are a couple mango seedlings in separate pots...



left is champagne, right is palmer.  both are growing, and i plan to let them continue growing at least until i can try the fruit.

here are a couple myricas in the same pot...



left is myrica californica, right is myrica cerifera.  now i just need to add myrica rubra.  once i add rubra i'm not sure if i'd remove the tops of californica or cerifera, even though neither is edible, given that both might be able to pollinate rubra.

on youtube i've watched a ton of grafting videos involving seedlings, and not once have any of the grafters mentioned the possibility that a seedling being used as a rootstock might have produced better fruit than the scion.  it's a fact though that any given superior variety only exists because it wasn't used as a rootstock. 

a seedling is used as a rootstock for a superior variety, which only exists because it wasn't used as a rootstock. 

anyways, i grafted the myricas and mangos while they were potted, which was tricky.  i think it's easier to do the grafting bareroot.

i don't know what the optimal length graft is.  it seems like a longer graft makes it easier for the plants to communicate and exchange resources. 

SanDiegoCherimoya

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2023, 10:24:59 PM »
The plant on the the left, is that a whip and tongue at the bottom of your graft?
no, that's the curvy base of the cherimoya.  the graft starts just above the curvy base and goes to just below the leaves. 

haha words are hard.  i was going to be 100% unlazy and show you from scratch, but then i decided to be 10% unlazy and show you some closer pics.  here are a couple mango seedlings in separate pots...



left is champagne, right is palmer.  both are growing, and i plan to let them continue growing at least until i can try the fruit.

here are a couple myricas in the same pot...



left is myrica californica, right is myrica cerifera.  now i just need to add myrica rubra.  once i add rubra i'm not sure if i'd remove the tops of californica or cerifera, even though neither is edible, given that both might be able to pollinate rubra.

on youtube i've watched a ton of grafting videos involving seedlings, and not once have any of the grafters mentioned the possibility that a seedling being used as a rootstock might have produced better fruit than the scion.  it's a fact though that any given superior variety only exists because it wasn't used as a rootstock. 

a seedling is used as a rootstock for a superior variety, which only exists because it wasn't used as a rootstock. 

anyways, i grafted the myricas and mangos while they were potted, which was tricky.  i think it's easier to do the grafting bareroot.

i don't know what the optimal length graft is.  it seems like a longer graft makes it easier for the plants to communicate and exchange resources.

Interesting. Thanks for the tips.

Obg1

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Re: Multiple rootstock grafting
« Reply #8 on: June 07, 2023, 06:06:50 AM »
Here's one I did on my Jackfruit.


 

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