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Messages - TonyinCC

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1
Pristine, Reverend Morgan,
Ozark gold,Brown Russet. I grew those near Charleston,SC and some years apples never defoliated completely in Winter. Chill hours are not an absolute. Heat resistance and disease resistance are more important. One year I had 2 crops of Carolina red June  rebloomed post crop after a dry spell in Summer and matured a few in Late Fall. Mediocre fruit so I don't recommend it. Lack of chill in general will often result in extended bloom over a couple months in some varieties.Hudsons golden gem and several other russet apples did well

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2
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Luu bang Jackfruit?
« on: November 19, 2023, 09:19:10 PM »
Is it possibly the pollen parent of your Sunshine yellow Crunchy Jak? I bought one of those from you and was very impressed. It had a bit of acidity and it seemed to have some banana flavor to it as well . Rag on Sunshine Yellow was actually pretty good and was 100 percent edible at the ripeness stage I got the fruit at.

3
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Pickering Starting To Flower
« on: November 09, 2023, 07:10:51 AM »
Mine is doing this now but just on one branch. Tree took a beating from Ian and had about half a normal crop this Summer Normally it is one of the last trees to bloom in my yard..

4
  Not sure if the Zill variety  "Little Gem" is in Australia or Hawaii , but it seems virtually immune to local anthracnose strains in my location in SW Florida. This year it was very wet at my location during the beginning of Summer and the clusters of fruit that stayed wet for long periods had russeting.  It still held a normal crop and internal fruit quality was high despite some fruit becoming almost completely russeted. That would be bad in a commercial sense , but as a home fruit grower, I don't care what it looks like. Little Gem can have very pretty fruit most years here.

 Maha Chanok fruit stayed clean. I think that variety is from Thailand. An added bonus with Maha is that it often fruits offseason. Its normal season is June-July here but have had fruit in December, January,March, and April from my trees in addition to the main season. Almost every year I get some offseason fruit but the months vary.

As a side note, Florigon and Duncan trees both died of different fungal diseases twice in my yard.

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Suggestions for a small hedge?
« on: August 15, 2023, 05:16:05 AM »
Cocoplum would work if it is an allowable plant at your location. Fruit is mild and bland but pleasant me the seed kernel is edible but I have never tried eating one of those.

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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: FEIJOA (pineapple guava) questions
« on: May 25, 2023, 04:12:11 PM »
The flowers to me taste better than the fruit .

7
I have heard the term tardily deciduous used to describe live oaks replacing leaves in Spring.

8
Any of the top 50 to 100 varieties in Florida discussed on this forum eaten at their peak would be hands down the best mango most people have ever tasted. 

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Malformation on Jakfruit Roots
« on: January 06, 2023, 04:40:12 PM »
I think those might be nodules of nitrogen fixing bacteria. I saw a reference to a research article about nitrogen fixers on Jackfruit but couldn't read article. If the tree was sickly my first thought might be nematodes, but I have dug up healthy feeder roots 20 feet from a tree with some small woody nodules on them. I have several legumes as ground covers in the area including sunshine mimosa. I think my Jackfruit must have picked up a compatible bacterial species. Some fungi are also known to produce root nodules that also give nitrogen to tree roots.

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sugar Cane In Cold Growing Zone
« on: November 20, 2022, 07:30:45 PM »
Some varieties can come back from roots after 10 degrees F. When I lived near St George,SC, people were growing a purple variety for syrup that did fine. Harvested in Fall and often not even mulched and came back year after year.... From what I remember, some varieties are much more tender to frost than others ,you could just harvest before a hard freeze and replant some stalks in Spring. There are some types better for chewing and others for processing.

11
Did not do an exact count but I estimate between 150 and 200. Lost about 25% of crop early in season due to drought.
Tree is a heavy bearer and holds well on the tree. This variety is relatively slow to develop off flavors and is not prone to sprout the seed while still on the tree like some other late varieties.

12
This year I started actively picking them Aug 15 when the last of my other mangos were finished. About 10 percent of crop came off the tree before then. Peak season was last week of Aug til Sept 10, but still had several dozen on tree at that point.Looks like I can now count on fruit pretty much the whole month of September from Little Gem. I think I might sometimes get a few fruit into October some years in the future. There  are still some Keitts on trees locally. Any other mangos still hanging in Florida?

13
Lots of Bell starfruit, Acerola, some Silas wood and Makok sapodillas, bananas, and a few Little Gem mangos left. The mature Keitt tree a block away from me is now bare, it had a few fruit on it yesterday. I can keep Bell fruiting pretty much year-round if I want to by fertilizing,watering, and bending twigs until they give a very slight cracking noise,this stimulates bloom pretty reliably. I get pretty sick of starfruit after a while...

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: It's September 1st, where are your Mangos?
« on: September 09, 2022, 02:02:55 PM »
I have some Little Gem still hanging that seem like they will last another week on the tree and There are some Keitts still on a tree in my neighborhood.

15
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Best mangos of this season
« on: August 19, 2022, 10:42:05 PM »
I still have a lot of Little Gems, some might hold another month on the tree.
 One thing I noticed this season was minimal coconut flavor on varieties that usually have a lot.
 Bailey's, Cotton Candy,and Little Gem were the best mangos I tasted this year. 
Dot from 3 different sources were all disappointing compared to other years.

16
I live on a corner lot with a vacant lot and a canal on 2 sides. .37 acres with close to 50 fruiting plants in total.

17
I have a badass resident mockingbird that drives all the other birds out of my yard. Before he arrived I had more fruit damage. It is prime real estate for a mockingbird. He won some epic battles for his territory with nearby rivals. Pretty fierce little bird. I came home one day and he was attacking a possum I caught in a live catch trap. He got in a rat trap once and his beak got a little cracked but he survived. Now he follows me around the yard hoping I stir up bugs for him to eat. He gets a bit of fruit but he earns his keep and gives all the other birds headaches. At times he can get more aggressive than a red winged blackbird. I have seen him attack burrowing owls (3 nests within a hundred yards of my house) which are locally abundant.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Tropical fruit in Pot
« on: August 06, 2022, 09:26:44 AM »
Bell Starfruit is self pollinating and will produce well. Fruit quality is good but mediocre when compared to other tropical fruits.

19
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Makok Sapodilla Tree
« on: July 21, 2022, 09:11:18 PM »
Surrounding a small tree  with wire fencing and burying it with straw for a few days during a really bad freeze can save it. I learned that trick to fruit bananas near Charleston,SC when I lived there.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Makok Sapodilla Tree
« on: July 21, 2022, 09:03:48 PM »
Makok is self pollinating and sets heavy crops. You will probably need to thin fruit. Give some weak liquid fertilizer often to try to push growth. Sapodillas don't like to be heavily pruned. I have lost a few by both pruning too hard and by digging up and moving them. I  also lost one transplanting when the lower third of root system fell off when removing from pot.  They can be very sensitive to root disturbance.

21
Little Gem might help extend your season, holds well on the tree a long time and has a wide harvest window. With as many varieties as you have, I would let Little Gem hang on the tree until almost all of your other fruit are gone. I haven't actually picked any yet this year and only ate a few (after ripening off the tree of course) that got knocked off during mowing accidents. I still have too many other mangos for another couple weeks so I am holding off harvesting the tree.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Makok Sapodilla Tree
« on: July 21, 2022, 12:11:38 PM »
Sapodillas are slow growers in general, and Makok is a dwarf variety. Go easy on the pruning and prune only when necessary.
This variety ripens a few fruit almost every month of the year for me. I have a tree about 6 years old that is only 5 feet tall and wide. The only pruning has been on branches that are dragged onto the ground by fruit. Fruit quality and size has improved every year, the first couple harvests the fruit had a greenish cast and grassy taste that went away in later years. Now quality is much improved with a more caramel colored internal appearance than before. I would think it is a good choice for your climate zone to keep in a pot or in ground in a greenhouse.


23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: only one
« on: July 16, 2022, 06:16:54 PM »
There are two finalists for this spot in my opinion.

Pickering is one of my latest blooming trees. This is good if frost is an issue at your location near or after normal mango bloom time. Not a good mango to pick mature green, best when they are about to drop and then wait a couple days before eating. Great productivity,tree health and  compact tree footprint, good sized fruit with a broadly appealing flavor. Fruit after harvest can last longer than most without developing off flavors. A fruit that is just below elite status when properly picked and ripened , but overall a favorite of many and one of the best choices for a single tree. Pickering's harvest window and tendency to drop when almost ripe is it's only shortcoming. Average season for this mango for me is about 6 weeks,but they start to drop as they get ripe so they won't hold on the tree.

  Little Gem is my choice if you only have room for one. Also late blooming. Small tree, very precocious and productive, with a potential harvest window from June to mid September. Fruit accidentally knocked off ripen decently as early as mid June,but I start picking July 15th. A few fruit hold as late as mid September. Fruit hold well on tree and on the table for a long time without developing off flavors. Later season fruit can be very coconutty. It is our family favorite but is a rich Indian/West Indies flavor which not everyone  prefers. Depending on harvest time, it can be very similar to Dwarf Hawaiian, Carrie, Julie,and Graham. It is like having a cocktail tree of those varieties. I think it is better than any of those at its peak. Elite at its best late in the season, but consistently at least very good. If not thinned fruit size will vary from small if in clusters to over a pound. 620 grams was the heaviest I weighed.
I have never tasted 40-26 but at its peak it tastes like Alex's description of that mango.
Fruit and tree seem spotless and free of disease. If I could only have one tree it would even edge out Pickering for the spot because of its extended season and the fact that it is almost like having a natural cocktail tree of mangos in its family tree.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango tree for central florida
« on: July 16, 2022, 04:30:18 PM »
Edgar has many good points but I think it would be a dirty looking tree unless it is in a windy spot with good air circulation around it in your yard. I am close to the coast and every year I am on the fence about top working it because it gets some sooty mold and BBS. It bears heavy at an early age, has a long season,stays small,and is just below top tier quality. I can start harvesting some mature green fruit in late April as soon as the top of the fruit gets just a hint of yellowish tan. Those ripen decently in 7-14 days. Unlike a lot of other varieties,it holds well on the tree and I usually eat the last fruit in early August. Last year I lost about 20 percent of remaining fruit to BBS starting the first week of July. As long as you harvest tree by then BBS shouldn't be a big issue.If you don't mind spraying for the sooty mold/BBS it should be a contender as an only tree.
Pickering is one of my latest blooming trees if frost is an issue at normal mango bloom time. Not a good mango to pick mature green, best when they are about to drop and then wait a couple days before eating. Great productivity,tree health and  compact tree footprint, good sized fruit with a broadly appealing flavor. Fruit after harvest can last longer than most without developing off flavors. Another fruit that is just below elite status when properly picked and ripened , but overall a favorite of many and one of the best choices for a single tree. Pickering's harvest window is it's only shortcoming. Average season for this mango for me is about 6 weeks,but they start to drop as they get ripe so they won't hold on the tree.
  Little Gem is another to consider.Small tree, very precocious and productive, with a potential harvest window from June to mid September. Fruit accidentally knocked off ripen decently as early as mid June,but I start picking July 15th. A few fruit hold as late as mid September. Fruit hold well on tree and on the table for a long time without developing off flavors. Later season fruit can be very coconutty. It is our family favorite but is a rich Indian/West Indies flavor which not everyone  prefers. Depending on harvest time, it can be very similar to Dwarf Hawaiian, Carrie, Julie,and Graham. It is like having a cocktail tree of those varieties. Fruit and tree seem spotless and free of disease. If I could only have one tree it would even edge out Pickering for the spot.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Mango tree for central florida
« on: July 16, 2022, 04:27:10 PM »
Edgar has many good points but I think it would be a dirty looking tree unless it is in a windy spot with good air circulation around it in your yard. I am close to the coast and every year I am on the fence about top working it because it gets some sooty mold and BBS. It bears heavy at an early age, has a long season,stays small,and is just below top tier quality. I can start harvesting some mature green fruit in late April as soon as the top of the fruit gets just a hint of yellowish tan. Those ripen decently in 7-14 days. Unlike a lot of other varieties,it holds well on the tree and I usually eat the last fruit in early August. Last year I lost about 20 percent of remaining fruit to BBS starting the first week of July. As long as you harvest tree by then BBS shouldn't be a big issue.If you don't mind spraying for the sooty mold/BBS it should be a contender as an only tree.
Pickering is one of my latest blooming trees if frost is an issue at normal mango bloom time. Not a good mango to pick mature green, best when they are about to drop and then wait a couple days before eating. Great productivity,tree health and  compact tree footprint, good sized fruit with a broadly appealing flavor. Fruit after harvest can last longer than most without developing off flavors. Another fruit that is just below elite status when properly picked and ripened , but overall a favorite of many and one of the best choices for a single tree. Pickering's harvest window is it's only shortcoming. Average season for this mango for me is about 6 weeks,but they start to drop as they get ripe so they won't hold on the tree.
  Little Gem is another to consider.Small tree, very precocious and productive, with a potential harvest window from June to mid September. Fruit accidentally knocked off ripen decently as early as mid June,but I start picking July 15th. A few fruit hold as late as mid September. Fruit hold well on tree and on the table for a long time without developing off flavors. Later season fruit can be very coconutty. It is our family favorite but is a rich Indian/West Indies flavor which not everyone  prefers. Depending on harvest time, it can be very similar to Dwarf Hawaiian, Carrie, Julie,and Graham. It is like having a cocktail tree of those varieties. Fruit and tree seem spotless and free of disease. If I could only have one tree it would even

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