Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - W.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 23
1
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Florida Buyer Beware - Publix Citrus
« on: March 16, 2023, 09:29:29 PM »
I too was greatly disappointed in the Sumo citrus I bought at my last trip to Publix. They were bland, which I had never experienced with fruit from that variety. It's not like I'd never bought them before from Publix, but it was my first time this citrus season.

2
I don't have as much of a Psidium collection as some other growers, just some of the standards: a couple of varieties of Psidium guajava, as well as cattleianum, friedrichsthalianum, guineense, longipetiolatum, and striatulum. Good plants. I particularly like striatulum because of its ornamental leaves and compact growth habit. I don't have to battle with it like I sometimes have to with guajava.

3
I've been growing P. longipetiolatum here in Seattle to test winter hardiness.

Last year, one out of two seedlings regrew from the roots in spring with lots of freezing weather and a winter low of 16F (-8.5C). I replanted a clone of the one that was killed, to give it one more chance (no backup clone this winter).

This winter has had many more freezing nights, but a winter low of "only" 17F (-8.3C). They both look pretty dead, but they did last year, too, and didn't regrow until late spring.
Mine literally got wrecked after 29f and a bit of snow. Not as hardy as I would have liked. I think you could get by in 8b.

That seems strange to me. Mine withstood multiple nights of freezing temperatures around 25F with very little damage until the 17F night, and these were small seedlings. Maybe there's variation among different specimens? If either of mine regrow again I'll maybe clone them to keep in the greenhouse for a few years before going in the ground again.

I think both weather variation and microclimates could have something to do with the different results seen in your plants. I would be interested to see where each of you planted your longipetiolatums, how long they were exposed to freezing temperatures per night, how much wind there was, and how much winter precipitation you had. All of these things can affect a plant just on the edge of making through a cold night. There are just so many variables.

I'm just glad I didn't plant out any of my longipetiolatums last summer. In December, my area experienced a severe cold snap, and the temperature did not rise above freezing for nearly 100 hours, with a low one night of 2F. There is no microclimate in any yard that can prevent weather like that from affecting cold-sensitive plants.

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Anyone post plants on instagram?
« on: March 15, 2023, 09:00:41 PM »
To each his (or her) own, but I don't have an Instagram account. I see no reason to provide Mark Zuckerberg pictures of my plants or anything else he can meta with.

Besides, we have a perfectly fine Tropical Fruit Forum here to post plant pictures on.

you dont have the drive or mindset to become plant influencers like us, you don't even know how many bot followers I have.

It's a bot eat bot world out there in the garden, where only the strongest programs survive. ;D

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Anyone post plants on instagram?
« on: March 15, 2023, 07:13:10 PM »
To each his (or her) own, but I don't have an Instagram account. I see no reason to provide Mark Zuckerberg pictures of my plants or anything else he can meta with.

Besides, we have a perfectly fine Tropical Fruit Forum here to post plant pictures on.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Any Info on Clavija euerganea?
« on: March 13, 2023, 04:26:47 PM »
All I know is that the Clavija seeds I bought from Trade Winds two or three years ago did nothing for me except rot after a while. I don't think I bought Clavija euerganea, though, since mine was described as an edible species.

I could have sworn this one rotted- was very surprised to see a sprout-

I got it because of the unknown cold tolerant while growing at a relatively high elevation and it seems a good candidate for container culture given the bush-like habit

Seeds apparently have a long germiantion time with this one coming up ~6 months later

I give all my seeds plenty of time to germinate, but, in this case, my Clavija seeds turned to mush pretty quickly. However, if I buy any Clavija seeds in the future, I will keep in mind your experience with delayed germination.

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Any Info on Clavija euerganea?
« on: March 12, 2023, 03:15:44 AM »
All I know is that the Clavija seeds I bought from Trade Winds two or three years ago did nothing for me except rot after a while. I don't think I bought Clavija euerganea, though, since mine was described as an edible species.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Eugenia dasyblasta taste report
« on: March 09, 2023, 12:05:07 AM »
You got me worried, I have a dasyblasta seedling and I had to go check where I got it from... and it was from W., so I have good confidence :)

And I didn't get my Dasyblasta seeds from Trade Winds.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Eugenia dasyblasta taste report
« on: March 08, 2023, 09:02:00 PM »
That is not a Dasyblasta; it is a standard variety of Surinam cherry. Based on the dark coloration, it could be descended from a Zill Dark or other improved Surinam cherry, but it is certainly not a Dasyblasta Surinam cherry. Dasyblasta is a variety of Eugenia uniflora, so its foliage looks identical to any other variety. But, one only has to remember the other name for the Dasyblasta variety, smooth pitanga, to know that the fruit is very different. Dasyblasta fruit is small, round, bright red, and smooth, not ribbed like other Surinam cherries.

Flying Fox Fruits' site has a photo that should give you an idea what a Dasyblasta actually looks like: https://www.flyingfoxfruits.com/product/pack-of-10-seeds-eugenia-uniflora-var-dasyblasta-or-smooth-pitanga-rare-fruit-tree/82

Unfortunately, Trade Winds, though overall a good seller, is not 100% accurate, and those mislabeled seeds become a big problem when growers buy them, invest years of time and effort growing them into fruiting plants, and get something completely different for all their trouble.

10
My fastest growing Plinias are the more common, standard varieties: Sabara, Grimal, and Escarlate. I have Reds, but for whatever reason, they have always lagged behind those other ones. Phitranthas also generally grow quickly, but I've found there is a bit more variation from plant to plant and variety to variety within that species. Nana is the slowest Plinia I have; it is a dwarf variety, though. Oblongatas vary wildly; I have one that grows well and two that don't. Blues and Yellows are similar to Oblongata with variation from seedling to seedling but a healthy plant will grow at a solid, if unspectacular rate. Rivularis is not a fast growing variety; water quality can set it back considerably. Never water it with anything other than rainwater if possible.

Now, I am only talking about vegetative growth, not time from seed to fruiting. My Sabaras and Grimals may grow vigorously, but they are not precocious varieties in terms of fruiting. Reds, Escarlates, and various Phitranthas are pretty much universally agreed to be the fastest fruiters, with the exception of Adam Shafran's Anomaly.

11
My loan was just approved to build a greenhouse. I am going the climate battery/ geothermal approach. My plan is to dig 8ft and install this. Not sure how well this will cool of my greenhouse in the summer but its worth a shot.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hGxy-abbKWk

That Atmos system looks like a variation on the "Greenhouse in the Snow" geoair method. Since Russ Finch's design was based more on keeping plants warm in the winter (though Nebraska gets plenty hot in the summer), I would be interested to know how such a system would function in the desert. I believe that it should, at least in principle. You may need more underground piping to further moderate the hot desert air you will be sucking in during the summer. I agree with fruitnut that you should do a good bit of research and probably crunch a lot of numbers about what your needs will be and whether this greenhouse system can economically meet those needs. I wish you luck on your project.

12
I want to thank everyone who chimed in with their advice.

I am not much of a proponent of grafting, but it certainly is an option, and one that I will likely have to resort to in order to maximize my Eugenias' fruit production.

Brian, I like your idea of two plants of the same species in one pot. I just wonder whether, since the plants are not exactly the same size, there would be an issue of one plant overpowering the other? But, I think I might try that idea with a couple of Eugenias.

Elouicious, it sounds like we are in the same situation as far as our collections overflowing our limited growing space. I've tried avoiding dioecious species, but like you, for the ones I have in my collection, I don't just have one; I have four or five. It doesn't take long for that to add up as those four or five, easy-to-keep little seedlings turn into four or five unruly plants growing every which way (and refusing to fruit).

13
I am growing several varieties and species of Plinias, Myricarias, and Eugenias. For almost every species or variety, I have at least two plants, the heir and the spare as one might say. But as one can see in the news, spares can sometimes become troublesome. ;) In my case, the trouble comes from the amount of space growing two of everything takes; my "ark" just isn't big enough right now.

So, my question is can I expect to get good fruit production if I only keep one plant of each of my Plinia, Myrciaria, and Eugenia species? I know that different varieties of the same species should have no difficulties with cross-pollination, but what about cross-pollination among different species? Will a Plinia nana and a Plinia rivularis be able to pollinate each other? How about a Eugenia repanda and a Eugenia involucrata? Or a Myrciaria floribunda and Myrciaria glazioviana? There are conflicting reports both online and on the Forum, particularly about Eugenias, so I would appreciate if anyone has a definitive answer.

14
I agree with the 0% survival rate estimate on these to-be decapitated pomelo seedlings.

I've had a couple of cherimoya and sugar apple seedlings survive the predicament tru's seedling is in. They struggled and always stayed stunted compared to their "sibling" seeds. But most of them die pretty quickly. I've no experience growing Annona neolaurifolia and not much success with the rarer Annonaceae, so take my growing advice on Annonas with a grain of salt. Still, there's no reason to not try and baby that seedling until it either grows or gives up the ghost, particularly since it was an expensive seed.

as an update the stem is still bright green! I hope it senses my effort and gives me a shoot ;D
btw that branca is doing amazing its flushed 4-5 times already, beautiful leaves

Good to hear your Branca jabo is doing well. Glad it found a good home. Hope it produces fruit for you sooner rather than later.

15
Has anyone created a passive solar style greenhouse, requiring little to no extra energy input?
Something using a similar concept to this:
https://www.mainepublic.org/environment-and-outdoors/2023-01-25/this-maine-home-can-stay-70-degrees-without-a-furnace-even-when-its-freezing-outside

These passive solar designs always seem to ignore the common winter condition of "freezing, windy, cloudy, wet for days in a row" where there is no meaningful solar heating and any accumulated thermal mass is gone by the second night. 

These passive solar house designs also always seem to ignore aesthetics with most being ugly as hell, the best only being bland, but all being incongruous to neighborhoods and landscapes (like a black, badly-proportioned house being plopped in the Maine countryside). I am also not enamored with their potential for irreparable or hard-to-repair age-related failures; frankly, I do not believe these houses will age well. Like most things constructed today, they are made seemingly to fail and be replaced. Such a throwaway mindset negates the positive environmental impact of their low energy consumption by building in a requirement to replace items that have high embodied energy.

Here is an example I cited when I worked in historic preservation. Vinyl replacement windows are very popular, touted as a way to save both the environment and money. The Obama administration attached all sorts of tax credits to their installation for that reason. Yet, they are a scourge, particularly to historic buildings, damaging to a building's historic fabric, the environment, and the building owner's pocketbook. I will not bore everyone with all the details, but one Kentucky study showed that it took between 30 and 45 years to recoup the initial expenditure of industry standard replacement window installation, while the windows themselves maintained their optimal energy savings for only 10 years, after which time their energy usage, air leakage, and insulating quality were no different in performance than historic wood windows in average condition. The difference between those replacement windows and the historic ones they replace, is that historic windows in suboptimal condition can be reglazed and repaired, often onsite and with only a modicum of skill and energy expenditure. Their replacements themselves have to be either completely replaced or sent back to the factory for repair once they are no longer functioning properly.

So, as you may be able to tell, I am not going to be demolishing my house and replacing it with the latest and greatest and greenest and trendiest. I will be sticking with things more tried and true because, as Neil Young sang, "Old ways comin' through again."

16
I agree with the 0% survival rate estimate on these to-be decapitated pomelo seedlings.

I've had a couple of cherimoya and sugar apple seedlings survive the predicament tru's seedling is in. They struggled and always stayed stunted compared to their "sibling" seeds. But most of them die pretty quickly. I've no experience growing Annona neolaurifolia and not much success with the rarer Annonaceae, so take my growing advice on Annonas with a grain of salt. Still, there's no reason to not try and baby that seedling until it either grows or gives up the ghost, particularly since it was an expensive seed.

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Jabuticaba soil mixes used
« on: January 25, 2023, 09:48:13 PM »
All my jaboticabas are potted in Miracle Gro potting soil. I've had no nutrient deficiencies or root problems with any of them. Of course, I also regularly fertilize them with Espoma to prevent the former and up pot them incrementally to prevent the latter. I've occasionally had tip burn on a few jaboticabas, Plinia rivularis seemingly being the most sensitive, but that was when I was forced to use city water on them. Frankly, I've been surprised since I started growing jaboticabas over the past few years at just how easy they are to grow.

18
Temperate Fruit Discussion / Re: More temperate, less tropical for zone8
« on: January 19, 2023, 02:45:22 AM »
I think we get too hot for hazelnuts?

Regardless of temperature, Eastern Filbert Blight makes growing hazelnuts a non-starter over much of the US.

19
In my part of the US, we had a bitter, record-breaking cold spell around Christmas. Temperatures were as low as 2F (I think that is about -15C), and we did not get above freezing for 90 hours. We had not had a cold snap like that for thirty years. Since that time, temperatures have fluctuated between average and above average spells. All the native plants in my area are unaffected by such cycles, but there are some non-native ornamentals which have shown signs of stirring from dormancy. It would be a bigger problem for me if my fruiting plants were acting that way and the way yours are. Unfortunately, short of protecting plants if they come out of dormancy, there is nothing you can do to push them back into dormancy.

20
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Noble Juicy Crunch Tangerine
« on: January 18, 2023, 06:23:02 PM »
Juicy Crunch is an excellent citrus variety, a standout among the blandness that usually fills the grocery store produce section. Publix has been carrying it for, I believe, three years. Although usually entirely seedless, every few fruits will have a viable seed. I've been growing my own plants for a couple of years from those rare seeds. It is the only way for a home grower to have access to Juicy Crunch; it is a patented variety that will likely never be available to the public.

Also, this topic should be moved to the Citrus General Discussion section of the Forum.

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Most Difficult to Grow Trees
« on: January 08, 2023, 02:31:00 PM »
Citrus are one of the hardest types for me to grow. While I do not have to worry about HLB, I do have to make sure their potting mix is just right and constantly defend them from spider mites.

Sapindaceae are probably the most difficult for me. I've managed to keep one lychee alive long-term but with the exception of that lychee and the generally easy-to-grow Mamoncillo, I've killed many other plants in that genus. I've given up on growing rambutan or pulasan.

22
I don't live in Florida, but I hope the cold I'm about to experience in North Alabama doesn't make it down to you. Each station's weather forecast is a little different but my low temperature on Friday is projected to be somewhere between 2F and 7F, and my area is expected to stay below freezing for about 84 straight hours. Needless to say, I am prepared for a high heating bill this month. Luckily, everything I have planted outside should withstand this cold snap. But, that is simply because I have yet to plant some of my zone pushing experiments in the ground. I think some zone pushers are unfortunately going to have a lot of damage to their plants depending on where they live.

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: How to Sprout Pouteria spp.
« on: December 16, 2022, 11:10:54 AM »
Glad that worked for you. There has been many other seeds with that hard seed coat I tried to take off but ended up smashing them in the process.
One of the coupeia edulis seeds I tried to crack but ended up killing it. At least you can eat the seed...call me crazy, but I tried it and it was pretty good.

I used a small, very finely toothed saw (normally used for model making and very fine woodworking) to carefully cut through the hard shell. I had a feeling that, like you, I would smash the seed if I tried to actually crack the seed coat.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: How to Sprout Pouteria spp.
« on: December 16, 2022, 09:48:52 AM »
This is the trick to speed up germination rates too.
Cinnamon apple took a year for me but 2 weeks for someone else after they removed the seed coat.

Similar story for me. I had my cinnamon apple seeds germinating for about a month with no results. I was worried about losing them (as I am with all my seeds), so I dug them out of their seed starting trays and made cuts to their hard coverings. Germination was very quick, probably only a couple of weeks, after that. 100% germination rate after that little trick.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 23
SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk