Author Topic: Light exposure for Jabo  (Read 612 times)

Japachumi-Jagua

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Light exposure for Jabo
« on: March 22, 2023, 08:38:42 PM »
I have a jaboticaba in my terrace, it is facing West so it gets approx 3hrs of direct sunlight. But there is enough indirect sunlight during the rest of the day, I believe indirect sunlight is not the same to partial shade. COuld this be harmful for it??

achetadomestica

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Re: Light exposure for Jabo
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2023, 09:48:19 PM »
I have some jabos under a large tree and they get morning sun
I also have some trees in the ground and they get a little more than half a day of sun.
The young trees I give less sun to.

Japachumi-Jagua

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Re: Light exposure for Jabo
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2023, 09:59:31 PM »
How do they do? I believe filtered sunlight under a tree is different, as I already said, to indirect sunlight

K-Rimes

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Re: Light exposure for Jabo
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2023, 10:19:36 PM »
I think it depends on your climate. If you have really low humidity, scorching sun and high temps, they like dappled shade or indirect light. If you are in a really humid mild climate near the ocean, I would wager full sun is do-able. Costa Rica has many micro climates, so tell us more. If a tree can get more hours of good sun, it will grow faster and fruit better, but the opposite is true if it's just getting roasted and hating its life... There is a balance.

My sabara is in dappled shade and maybe gets 2-3 hours of direct over head sun in the summer. My climate is very low humidity, dry hot summer weather. It does very well.

When I trialed my jabos in full sun last year, both young and old, they all suffered immensely. I will not make that same mistake again.

CeeJey

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Re: Light exposure for Jabo
« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2023, 10:45:52 PM »
Just as a data point, I had a fungal incident that required me to move a bunch of my one-gallon infant jaboticaba (along with a bunch of eugenia and some coffee) outside earlier than I wanted.

They're currently getting 4 to 8+ hours of "direct" sunlight filtered through 30% shade cloth plus some indirect light the rest of the day, and almost all of them are doing great (I can't tell if the two that aren't doing great are because of that or because of something else, though). Current temps here are 46 lows (usually in the 50s at night) 70 highs and relatively humid for this area.

Japachumi-Jagua

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Re: Light exposure for Jabo
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2023, 09:46:22 AM »
I am in the driest zone of CR near the pacific ocean, but still some tropical weather for 6 or + months the year. Now we are in dry season, strong winds and, consequently low humidity. This time of the year the sun gets a lot of plants burned, and the winds just make it worse...
Costant temperature of 33-37C+ which is 91-98F

I think it depends on your climate. If you have really low humidity, scorching sun and high temps, they like dappled shade or indirect light. If you are in a really humid mild climate near the ocean, I would wager full sun is do-able. Costa Rica has many micro climates, so tell us more. If a tree can get more hours of good sun, it will grow faster and fruit better, but the opposite is true if it's just getting roasted and hating its life... There is a balance.

My sabara is in dappled shade and maybe gets 2-3 hours of direct over head sun in the summer. My climate is very low humidity, dry hot summer weather. It does very well.

When I trialed my jabos in full sun last year, both young and old, they all suffered immensely. I will not make that same mistake again.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2023, 09:56:50 AM by Japachumi-Jagua »

achetadomestica

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Re: Light exposure for Jabo
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2023, 11:53:49 AM »
You can place the pot in an area and make sure the tree is ok before you plant it.
Here's a picture of one of my sabaras. It has a slight lean from Hurricane Ian last year
It is fruiting now and had a nice batch of fruit a month ago.












Japachumi-Jagua

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Re: Light exposure for Jabo
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2023, 12:32:20 PM »
The house is not mine, and the owner hates my plants  :-\ So I have to keep them in a hidden place... ;D

K-Rimes

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Re: Light exposure for Jabo
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2023, 12:32:46 PM »
I am in the driest zone of CR near the pacific ocean, but still some tropical weather for 6 or + months the year. Now we are in dry season, strong winds and, consequently low humidity. This time of the year the sun gets a lot of plants burned, and the winds just make it worse...
Costant temperature of 33-37C+ which is 91-98F

I think it depends on your climate. If you have really low humidity, scorching sun and high temps, they like dappled shade or indirect light. If you are in a really humid mild climate near the ocean, I would wager full sun is do-able. Costa Rica has many micro climates, so tell us more. If a tree can get more hours of good sun, it will grow faster and fruit better, but the opposite is true if it's just getting roasted and hating its life... There is a balance.

My sabara is in dappled shade and maybe gets 2-3 hours of direct over head sun in the summer. My climate is very low humidity, dry hot summer weather. It does very well.

When I trialed my jabos in full sun last year, both young and old, they all suffered immensely. I will not make that same mistake again.

My personal opinion for jabos in this type of climate is to have dappled shade. I have tried various times with full sun, even on mature trees, and they fried to a crisp. 

John B

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Re: Light exposure for Jabo
« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2023, 03:34:03 PM »
Even morning full sun? Let's say from 8-12? Then shade afternoon? I have a southwest spot that is shaded by a very large podocarpus tree in the afternoon.

K-Rimes

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Re: Light exposure for Jabo
« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2023, 03:41:44 PM »
Even morning full sun? Let's say from 8-12? Then shade afternoon? I have a southwest spot that is shaded by a very large podocarpus tree in the afternoon.

Morning sun is good stuff, but again, San Diego has many micro climates. I would wager a jabo full sun inland would suffer. If you're by the water let em eat.

Japachumi-Jagua

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Re: Light exposure for Jabo
« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2023, 03:45:54 PM »
Afternoon sun not morning sun...

John B

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Re: Light exposure for Jabo
« Reply #12 on: March 23, 2023, 04:27:34 PM »
Even morning full sun? Let's say from 8-12? Then shade afternoon? I have a southwest spot that is shaded by a very large podocarpus tree in the afternoon.

Morning sun is good stuff, but again, San Diego has many micro climates. I would wager a jabo full sun inland would suffer. If you're by the water let em eat.

Thanks. Yeah, I get a little warm. 10 mi as the crow flys. I'll test them out.

Jeramyl

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Re: Light exposure for Jabo
« Reply #13 on: March 25, 2023, 01:54:59 AM »
I had the same thought John B.  Im in Bay Park and Im worried about that afternoon, west facing sun exposure.  Well see!

SDPirate

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Re: Light exposure for Jabo
« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2023, 01:24:28 PM »
I am new to jabos since last year.  I'm pretty close to the water.  The one I have growing in 10b here near the coast got a little crispy in full sun during the summer and even a bit until early fall.  I had then moved it to a place where it gets dappled/partial sun in the morning and shade around noon and it seems happy there.  We can get a lot of cloudless summer days with intense summer sun near the coast so that is just my opinion, San Diego has a lot of microclimates though.

 

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