Author Topic: Grow pots for dwarf citrus  (Read 1107 times)

SusanB

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Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« on: August 20, 2022, 12:43:58 AM »
Hi all, I'm in the USA and grow dwarf citrus trees.  Most are in grip lip 4000 pots, which I think are 9.2 gallons or something like that.  I have a greenhouse but move all my plants out in the summer and that's about as big as I can carry.
My problem, and I'm sure many of you have the same, is that I can't find any pots of that size.  I can find lots of 10 gallon pots but they are all about 11 inches tall and I want them at least 14" deep 
Does anyone have any suggestions on where to get pots?  Our (semi) local greenhouse supply isn't very helpful as far as ordering supplies.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2022, 06:19:36 PM »
Try one of the root pruning systems - Rootmaker, MicroKote, Griffin's Spin-out.   Been using them for decades for citrus and other tropicals.

pagnr

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2022, 07:25:56 PM »
I think if you GooG search the pots you are after you will find suppliers.
I did that and they look like good pots.
Sometimes they may be Trade based, so might be hard to order smaller quantities.
Might be better to buy a few years supply, or on sell some from a full pack etc.
I just keep looking for the best price / freight combo.
Also I have ordered irrigation stuff, tree labels, grafting knives, from USA to Australia,
and if item on sale, still comes out cheaper than buying same thing from Australian supplier.

For the Citrus pots you are using I use 25 litre tall grow bags. Once the tree settles in they are more stable.
I move them and most pots on a hand trolley ( gas bottle  type ).

1rainman

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2022, 08:23:37 PM »
I use these giant plastic buckets and poke holes in the bottom. They are like 20 gallon or something. Used to be at target sometimes see them. I got a bunch someone was throwing away.

First they are the right size for grapes, citrus and other large plants . Bigger than any pots they sell. But they are like $10 or $15 while a huge pot is some outrageous price.

I don't even know what they are supposed to be for. I don't know if they still sell them. They must be somewhere.

When I had my Meyer lemon in the bucket it was too heavy to carry when wet. Let it dry out like the dirt totally dry and still hard to carry due to bulk and thorns but surprisingly not heavy for a huge plant. The weight is mostly water in the soil . If you use potting soil like miracle grow that is. I'm s mostly perlite and peat moss and mulch on top. Not heavy when dry


socalbalcony2

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2022, 12:11:05 PM »
Try one of the root pruning systems - Rootmaker, MicroKote, Griffin's Spin-out.   Been using them for decades for citrus and other tropicals.

Does MicroKote work like other root pruning systems, eg a fabric pot? More lateral roots and less circling? Why wouldn't everyone just use MicroKote, Rootmakers require more watering, no?

Also is copper toxicity ever a problem?

TIA

K-Rimes

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2022, 01:36:31 PM »
Just going to chime in that you DO NOT want to use fabric pots. They end up making the soil hydrophobic over the course of about a year. Growing tomatoes or something for the summer in them is great, but they are NOT good for long term use. Been there done that.

Juls

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2022, 12:32:12 PM »
I bought these at Lowes: 16*14 https://www.lowes.com/pd/Style-Selections-20-IN-FALERNO-PLANTER-WHITE/5001796345
They have a large selection of pots. Am I missing something?

FruitGrower

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2022, 03:47:29 PM »
Just going to chime in that you DO NOT want to use fabric pots. They end up making the soil hydrophobic over the course of about a year. Growing tomatoes or something for the summer in them is great, but they are NOT good for long term use. Been there done that.

Can you elaborate on how that happened?

David H

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #9 on: August 24, 2022, 06:13:54 PM »
Some potting mixes,particularly if there is a high percentage of peat, can be difficult to rewet if they dry out.  Application of a soil wetting agent,either in granular or liquid form, about once a year, should fix it. 

1rainman

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #10 on: August 24, 2022, 07:52:26 PM »
Maybe if you're indoors. Outside just give them a good soaking with the hose. They do dry out quick in hot weather so I mix a small amount of clay from cheap cat litter. That moisture retaining potting soil they sell is garbage. Plants don't do well in it but the clay with mulch on top works. Then I let them get bone dry to move them. Doesn't bother the plant because only takes a few days to dry them out usually or a week.

GFC

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #11 on: August 25, 2022, 10:24:00 AM »
bought these at Lowes: 16*14 https://www.lowes.com/pd/Style-Selections-20-IN-FALERNO-PLANTER-WHITE/5001796345
They have a large selection of pots. Am I missing something?


Those are nice pots and the price is reasonable. Good find

K-Rimes

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #12 on: August 25, 2022, 01:48:18 PM »
Just going to chime in that you DO NOT want to use fabric pots. They end up making the soil hydrophobic over the course of about a year. Growing tomatoes or something for the summer in them is great, but they are NOT good for long term use. Been there done that.

Can you elaborate on how that happened?

I have used these with a great deal of different soil mixes and the end result is always the same - the outer layer dries out rapidly due to evaporation to the point it can become hydrophobic especially in the case of peat mixes, but aged forest product soils, sand, coco coir etc all eventually meet the same end in my opinion and experience. "Just soak the pot" only works so well after awhile. The water never reaches the outside of the pot. At least with a plastic pot the path of least resistance is often around the outside. It'll just pour out the side of a fabric pot if you experience the same condition I did.

In Florida you may have different experiences due to substantially higher humidity than inland CA temps and % but anyways, just relaying my experience.

The other issue is that the fabric deteriorates in the sun and you can say goodbye to those handles in about 1 year's time.

I simply cannot fathom why you want to use these for long term growing. They're not made of long-term materials.

1rainman

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #13 on: August 25, 2022, 02:49:47 PM »
We have 100% humidity levels in Florida, though as the temperature fluctuates that may come down to 80% or whatever during the day- it's usually 100% early morning or right before the sun comes up. And despite the damp air, plants will dry out quickly in the hot sun because its 95 or 100 degrees.

My comment was in regards to peat moss drying out and becoming hydrophobic. It's not too hard to rehydrate peat moss. When I had my dwarf meyer lemon in a plastic container I would let it dry out before I moved it. Most of the weight was just water in the soil and its suprisingly not that heavy when dried out. Then I would have to give it massive soaking to get the dirt wet again. Which is usually miracle grow potting soil or seed starter mix which is mostly perlite and peat moss. With wet dirt is too heavy to move or extremely difficult in the least.

FruitGrower

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #14 on: August 25, 2022, 09:53:01 PM »
Just going to chime in that you DO NOT want to use fabric pots. They end up making the soil hydrophobic over the course of about a year. Growing tomatoes or something for the summer in them is great, but they are NOT good for long term use. Been there done that.

Can you elaborate on how that happened?

I have used these with a great deal of different soil mixes and the end result is always the same - the outer layer dries out rapidly due to evaporation to the point it can become hydrophobic especially in the case of peat mixes, but aged forest product soils, sand, coco coir etc all eventually meet the same end in my opinion and experience. "Just soak the pot" only works so well after awhile. The water never reaches the outside of the pot. At least with a plastic pot the path of least resistance is often around the outside. It'll just pour out the side of a fabric pot if you experience the same condition I did.

In Florida you may have different experiences due to substantially higher humidity than inland CA temps and % but anyways, just relaying my experience.

The other issue is that the fabric deteriorates in the sun and you can say goodbye to those handles in about 1 year's time.

I simply cannot fathom why you want to use these for long term growing. They're not made of long-term materials.

Interesting, thank you.

brian

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #15 on: September 06, 2022, 11:50:54 AM »
I guess it's a laundry basket. They have different size ones too
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Mainstays-Flexible-Tub-with-Rope-Handles-Laundry-Basket-Black/910911263?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&wl13=5034&adid=22222222278910911263_117755028669_12420145346&wmlspartner=wmtlabs&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=m&wl3=501107745824&wl4=pla-293946777986&wl5=1015178&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=local&wl12=910911263&wl13=5034&veh=sem_LIA&gclid=Cj0KCQjwjIKYBhC6ARIsAGEds-KcaxcJcPEkB7jBWPkOweeok6kO-NuA4m11-aVFJGRt-d7QT8jAOAsaAiRWEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

1rainman, I ordered some of these containers and they indeed seem great, however the recycling mark indicates they are made from polypropylene which seems to be one of the plastics most affected by UV exposure.  Because it is black it might have more resistance (I think black coloration is from carbon black which has some UV resistance) but I am going to see how long they last before I order more. 

Thanks for mentioning, I'll post back if they start cracking

EDIT - I found this graph that gives me some hope, it shows massive improvement with black coloring (which I assume is always carbon black).  Different plastic, but encouraging
from https://tanks.polyprocessing.com/hubfs/pdf/technical/CarbonBlackandPlastics.pdf

« Last Edit: September 06, 2022, 01:08:58 PM by brian »

John B

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #16 on: September 06, 2022, 01:53:07 PM »
I guess it's a laundry basket. They have different size ones too
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Mainstays-Flexible-Tub-with-Rope-Handles-Laundry-Basket-Black/910911263?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&wl13=5034&adid=22222222278910911263_117755028669_12420145346&wmlspartner=wmtlabs&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=m&wl3=501107745824&wl4=pla-293946777986&wl5=1015178&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=local&wl12=910911263&wl13=5034&veh=sem_LIA&gclid=Cj0KCQjwjIKYBhC6ARIsAGEds-KcaxcJcPEkB7jBWPkOweeok6kO-NuA4m11-aVFJGRt-d7QT8jAOAsaAiRWEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

1rainman, I ordered some of these containers and they indeed seem great, however the recycling mark indicates they are made from polypropylene which seems to be one of the plastics most affected by UV exposure.  Because it is black it might have more resistance (I think black coloration is from carbon black which has some UV resistance) but I am going to see how long they last before I order more. 

Thanks for mentioning, I'll post back if they start cracking

EDIT - I found this graph that gives me some hope, it shows massive improvement with black coloring (which I assume is always carbon black).  Different plastic, but encouraging
from https://tanks.polyprocessing.com/hubfs/pdf/technical/CarbonBlackandPlastics.pdf


Where I'm at in Socal, they will last about a summer in full sun before becoming brittle. Bought those years ago and they cracked when I tried to move the plant months later. Maybe the plastic is better now?

Jaboticaba45

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2022, 02:20:00 PM »
Can't go wrong with the rootmakers as Mark stated. Work super well for me.

brian

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #18 on: September 06, 2022, 02:26:47 PM »


Where I'm at in Socal, they will last about a summer in full sun before becoming brittle. Bought those years ago and they cracked when I tried to move the plant months later. Maybe the plastic is better now?

You had black ones, right?  If so I expect my experience will be the same as yours.  Oh well, polypropylene may just be awful in sun even with stabilizing carbon.  The graph above is for HDPE, but I was hoping black PP would still last a few years.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2022, 02:29:37 PM by brian »

Seanny

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #19 on: September 06, 2022, 02:55:57 PM »
Iím using 15G pots.
Iím filling them 2/3.
No need to fill to top.

15G pot is tall so less bending to move them around.

1rainman

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #20 on: September 06, 2022, 03:07:42 PM »
I have all different colors. Several years old. Still holding up. I don't notice any difference in the different colors but I haven't really paid attention. They are not super durable, which is why they cost like $10. Definately if you have a lot of weight in them and moving them by the top of the pot they can possibly break due to being so thin, I scoot them around or pick up from the buttom. But they will last several years.

They will slowly get weaker over time, especially in the sun, but it will take several years. I see some of mine getting weak. Some empty ones that I never poked holes in have tiny cracks on the bottom- I mean its probably five years old though sitting outside.  I've had regular plastic pots they sell for plants eventually get brittle and break apart at about the same rate as these. So these seem to be made of the same plastic as most pots. The only difference these are thinner and not as sturdy as a typical pot.

Typically a pot never lasts me that long anyway. I can pay a zillion dollars for one- whether its clay or plastic or whatever it'll probably get chipped, broken or something in five or ten years. Or I can pay $10 for this one and when it wears out it's not a big deal.

Definately the sun is the main thing that will start breaking them down. If you had them in a dark storage place they will break down eventually but would probably last 50 years. In Ohio I had mine indoors half the year and outside half the year. The sun doesn't get intense very often there, maybe a few weeks in summer. In Florida mine are in partial shade. If they were in full sun in the tropics they would probably wear out in about two years.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2022, 03:12:21 PM by 1rainman »

John B

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Re: Grow pots for dwarf citrus
« Reply #21 on: September 07, 2022, 12:03:26 AM »


Where I'm at in Socal, they will last about a summer in full sun before becoming brittle. Bought those years ago and they cracked when I tried to move the plant months later. Maybe the plastic is better now?

You had black ones, right?  If so I expect my experience will be the same as yours.  Oh well, polypropylene may just be awful in sun even with stabilizing carbon.  The graph above is for HDPE, but I was hoping black PP would still last a few years.

Yes, black.

I have all different colors. Several years old. Still holding up. I don't notice any difference in the different colors but I haven't really paid attention. They are not super durable, which is why they cost like $10. Definately if you have a lot of weight in them and moving them by the top of the pot they can possibly break due to being so thin, I scoot them around or pick up from the buttom. But they will last several years.

Wondering if the difference is where they are manufactured...some may be different factories and countries. Some made in USA and in different cities, some in China.

 

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