Author Topic: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's  (Read 1621 times)

Gone tropo

  • Durian obsessed
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
    • Nth Qld Australia, zone 13a
    • View Profile
the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« on: August 23, 2023, 11:53:44 PM »
Can anyone confirm or advise on mango tree varieties that are the mos resistant to anthracnose?

I have read that Florigon is one of the best is this true ?

What about out of the fancy new Zill varieties such as Orange sherbert, sweet tart etc how do these fair ?

I have nam doc mai and maha and they both get anthracnose they still manage to set some fruit.  Looking for a few more.

Climate is average 3000mm rain a year (118inches) with wet years up 5000mm (196inches) high humidity and much more tropical than florida.

Can anyone advise thanks

Greater Good

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 112
    • Coral Gables, Florida
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2023, 12:48:21 AM »
Duncan, Cecilove

booeyschewy

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 59
    • Bahia, Brazil
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2023, 05:15:25 AM »
Iím planting casturi which apparently does well with rains during flowering and is resistant. Fwiw in Brazil Koppert (Dutch multinational) manufactures a biologic treatment for anthracnose which is organic and whatnot. Iíve thought about it because where I am climate change has stopped cashew and mango from producing from rains and anthracnose.

Gone tropo

  • Durian obsessed
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
    • Nth Qld Australia, zone 13a
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2023, 03:32:30 PM »
Damn I donít think we have any of these in Australia

hipasfolk

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 58
    • Central FL, Zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2023, 04:00:56 PM »
I don't know where they are in relation to your location but a few AUS nurseries on google seem to stock Duncan which is a great choice. Orange Sherbet for me has been more MBBS resistant than anthracnose resistant. I just added an Orange Essence to my own home tree set up here in FL and I believe they're supposed to be relatively disease resistant all around.

Cecilove shows a lot of disease resistance promise and would probably be a better choice over Sweet Tart (both are amazing) but I'm not sure if that's made it's way to AU yet as it's monoembryonic.

skhan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2262
    • United States, Florida, Coral Springs, 10b
    • View Profile
    • Videos of Garden
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2023, 04:21:39 PM »
I would assume Duncan works well.

I found a lot of the anthracnose resistance varieties experience terrible post-harvest fungal issues. I'm 15 miles from the coast but all developed land on the way.
I had a lot fewer problems when my trees were smaller, I guess the airflow and sunlight really helped.

Depending on your disease pressure I would check in on the growers in Loxahatchee and Southwest Ranches FL.

I have pretty substantial disease issues here but nothing compared to those guys, (I never get around to spraying copper though)

roblack

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2869
    • Miami, FL 11A
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2023, 06:37:30 PM »
Sweet Tart is pretty clean here, no spraying.

Gone tropo

  • Durian obsessed
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
    • Nth Qld Australia, zone 13a
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2023, 06:51:01 PM »
Thanks for responses will have a look at duncan and sweet tart.  We have orange sherbert here lemon zest, sweet tart, coconut cream plus a fair few others from zills now.

So what do you guys think is the main driver of these diseases, is it high rainfall or high humidity or a combination of both?? I have been to florida around fort lauderdale however im not familiar with all areas mentioned. So being inland from the sea is worse for mango diseases ? Is this because of a lack of salt in the air ?

Would florida experiencing much more cold than my area make disease pressure worse than tropical areas? I know in my area Kensington pride are useless they produce almost no fruit and anything that does manage to grow is covered with black crap.

Unfortunately whilst australia is heavily involved in commercial mango growing and research its all done in very dry areas that are not applicable to my area so this site is more useful resource than the government reasearch done here.

booeyschewy

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 59
    • Bahia, Brazil
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2023, 04:32:21 AM »
Itís common in many tropical fruit trees in humid areas. In mango rains during the flowering season is a big factor. Early rains in the dry season in Florida tend to mess up the crop there too. Itís a challenge. I have rain year round and youíll find mangos producing here but itís the exception and somewhat random.

happyhana

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 139
    • Hana, Hawaii
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2023, 02:23:23 PM »
Your growing conditions are more similar to wet Hawaii than Florida.

Itís going to be a real challenge. Iíve yet to plant mangoes but have been observing friends trees for years. Casturi is dependable and can be tasty but has a unique flavor not everyone likes. Of the indica varieties Rapoza, R2E2 and Keitt can do well in a drier microclimate if the rains and flowering cooperate. Of the three Rapoza is by far my favorite, orange sherbet with hints of coconut.

My plan is to topwork with multiple varieties on some wild mangoes already in the ground.

palmcity

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 813
    • Martin County, Fl zone10a
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2023, 05:07:00 PM »

So what do you guys think is the main driver of these diseases, is it high rainfall or high humidity or a combination of both?? I have been to florida around fort lauderdale however im not familiar with all areas mentioned. So being inland from the sea is worse for mango diseases ? Is this because of a lack of salt in the air ?

Unfortunately australia  involved in commercial mango growing and research its all done in very dry areas
Opinions... Everyone has one so here's mine (IMO):::
Main driver: Temperature especially night time as 70's F is great for fungus growth.
                 : Temperature above 85 F to high 90's F is great to decrease fungus growth.

My 2nd choice: Humidity-both coast & inland S.Fl. plenty of moisture for fungus & bacteria growth. (Australia arid areas should have less fungal/bacteria growth if arid environment where trees are growing)

Possibilities for worse mango growth inland IMO::: Cooler nights (TEMPERATURE) in 70's vs. warmer 80's more common at coast and IMO 70's is ideal for fungus growth.

TEMPERATURE:::Either coast or inland can have higher than 85F with sunny skys which is great to decrease fungus growth especially Temperature increase with sunlight. Miami has overall higher temperatures day & night combined than Palm City as I'm north of them and thus is why IMO they have less fungal issues than at my location (both can have very high humidity).

IMO Rainfall = similar to humidity as close to 100 percent is rainfall. Both can get it.
IMO Salt in Air = insignificant distance to effects observed.

« Last Edit: August 25, 2023, 05:28:41 PM by palmcity »

fruit nerd

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 239
    • Australia, FNQ, 13a
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2023, 06:25:27 AM »
Give me a few years and I might be able to give you a decent answer. I have a bunch of mango varieties including southern Indian, SE Asian, Floridan and Australian cultivars, but only 2 are ready to fruit. I wonder though whether it's worth looking locally though. At Newell Beach there is a mango tree that flowers very early and has a small amount of fruit at the moment, despite the wet dry season. I tried some fruit off it last year. Has nice colour but the flavour isn't great. Still, if it fruit early and reliably, could be worth grafting. Heard there is a good mango tree at Wonga Beach but don't know much about that one.

Gone tropo

  • Durian obsessed
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
    • Nth Qld Australia, zone 13a
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2023, 05:08:17 PM »
Fruit nerd my nam doc mai is loaded with flowers atm we have had 26mm of rain over last 3 days letís see if they all get anthracnose and fall off.  Maha also has flowers but not as many.

fruit nerd

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 239
    • Australia, FNQ, 13a
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #13 on: August 27, 2023, 04:53:41 AM »
Still waiting for mine to flower. My neighbor also has a nam doc mai and it hasn't flowered yet. Don't know why yours flowers so much in comparison. Tip borers give me a hard time so perhaps that is part of the reason. I imagine it's going to be a bad mango season this year. Not many trees in the area have any fruit at the moment.

Steph

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 41
    • Hana Maui USA
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #14 on: August 27, 2023, 03:41:15 PM »
Iíve been trying to grow mangos in a wet zone for over 25 years. Weíve gotten very marginal success with Fairchild, Rapoza, Ewais, Kau Dwarf, and Vallenato. For really wet areas I highly recommend mango relatives. You might want to try them before planting as they have unfamiliar flavors and can be very fibrous.

Kuini (Mangifera odorata) can bear several times a year, often in winter. I love this fruit but it is very smelly (mercaptan/propane?) and fibrous. Very productive, no anthracnose. No fruit flies. You can pick unblemished fruit up off the ground from a huge tree.
Kasturi (Mangifera casturi). Very small, dark fruits. Extremely fibrous, youíre pretty much sucking juice.  Delightful, unique flavor some have likened to lychee. Early season
Lalee Jewo (Mangifera lalijiwa) very mild flavor, very low acid , reminiscent of sugar cane juice.

Gone tropo

  • Durian obsessed
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
    • Nth Qld Australia, zone 13a
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #15 on: August 27, 2023, 11:41:08 PM »
Steph with 2800mm of rain already for the year so far (110 inches) I should probably give up on mango !!!! Ive never heard of those varieties you mention here.  Maybe they are in some obscure place certainly not mainstream.

David H

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 26
    • Australia Qld. Ravenshoe 4888 .zone 10
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #16 on: August 28, 2023, 06:13:36 PM »
 Gone Troppo,
                    Of those that Steph mentions,we have Fairchild, M. casturi, and M.odorata. All over 35 years.  The kuini is the most disease resistant for us, completely clean fruit,bears well every couple of years, very pretty tree in flower, flowers v.well,with large panicles of red, scented flowers.  The casturi should be suitable for you, but it's out of its zone here. (1,000 metres altitude ) Grafted on indica, very healthy tree, but I haven't seen a single flower.   Fairchild is a small, healthy,dense
tree,and bears very clean fruit as well.   Articles on the internet will tell you that it is from Panama, but David Fairchild collected the seed from fruit he ate in Saigon, and sent them to the U.S. research station in Panama.  So it's a Vietnamese cultivar. We have four other Vietnamese cultivars. Fairchild is the most disease resisitant of them. The seeds of  Fairchild that I've opened were mainly mono,a couple were poly. Probably safer to graft it.    Kuini is poly.  I can send
seed of Kuini when it fruits next,or you can collect some scions of them if you're up this way sometime.  Fairchild has small fruit,but fibreless and well-flavoured. I like the kuini as well, but probably too strong-flavoured for some. 

Gone tropo

  • Durian obsessed
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
    • Nth Qld Australia, zone 13a
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #17 on: August 28, 2023, 06:39:22 PM »
Gone Troppo,
                    Of those that Steph mentions,we have Fairchild, M. casturi, and M.odorata. All over 35 years.  The kuini is the most disease resistant for us, completely clean fruit,bears well every couple of years, very pretty tree in flower, flowers v.well,with large panicles of red, scented flowers.  The casturi should be suitable for you, but it's out of its zone here. (1,000 metres altitude ) Grafted on indica, very healthy tree, but I haven't seen a single flower.   Fairchild is a small, healthy,dense
tree,and bears very clean fruit as well.   Articles on the internet will tell you that it is from Panama, but David Fairchild collected the seed from fruit he ate in Saigon, and sent them to the U.S. research station in Panama.  So it's a Vietnamese cultivar. We have four other Vietnamese cultivars. Fairchild is the most disease resisitant of them. The seeds of  Fairchild that I've opened were mainly mono,a couple were poly. Probably safer to graft it.    Kuini is poly.  I can send
seed of Kuini when it fruits next,or you can collect some scions of them if you're up this way sometime.  Fairchild has small fruit,but fibreless and well-flavoured. I like the kuini as well, but probably too strong-flavoured for some.

David thanks for the info, i dont think i will plant any of the mango related species at this stage takes up room of other stuff however looks like fairchild might be one to add to the list to track down thanks.

David H

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 26
    • Australia Qld. Ravenshoe 4888 .zone 10
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #18 on: August 28, 2023, 07:53:05 PM »
Gone tropo,
                 Whatever you like. I wouldn't get too hung up about what species the tree is. Except when it's in flower,the  kuini tree is just like a mango tree with clean leaves.  No disease on the leaves here. If you have space for a mango tree, it's probably your best bet. A high chance that it would fruit there.  I could send a
couple of fruit when it fruits next if you like, to see if you like the fruit.  Certainly in the rich-flavoured category.   After durian, it could be a little odour-deficient, though. Probably better to graft on indica to reduce the tree size a bit.

David H

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 26
    • Australia Qld. Ravenshoe 4888 .zone 10
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #19 on: August 28, 2023, 08:16:38 PM »
I guess this is pedantry, but I'll just note here that  Kostermans in his book "The Mangoes",is quite emphatic that Mangifera odorata is a species, and not a hybrid of M.foetida and M. indica, as some posts on this website claim.  He gives detailed reasons for that , if anyone is interested.

David H

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 26
    • Australia Qld. Ravenshoe 4888 .zone 10
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #20 on: August 28, 2023, 11:45:18 PM »
I'm not sure if the tree of M. odorata here is correctly a "kuini." According to Kostermans book, there are different selections of M.odorata with different names. (He spells the most common form "Kweni " )   The one here was brought back by David Chandlee, who spent some time looking for the best M.odorata he could find,and  this one was supposed to be the best that he found.  Also, I should be more specific with the flower description . The dominant colour of the inflorescence of this one is red,but I don't think the individual florets were red.   I did take a photo of it in flower,but I'd have to find it ,then try to figure out how to post it here. Too much  time.
         

fruit nerd

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 239
    • Australia, FNQ, 13a
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #21 on: August 29, 2023, 05:19:04 AM »
I do have a M. odorata, still small but growing well. Looking forward to trying that one. Any opinions on M. pajang? It is also available in Australia.

yoski

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 106
    • Sebring, FL
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #22 on: August 29, 2023, 08:35:46 AM »
For me Edward, Pickering and Angie have been the most trouble free varieties.
Lemon Zest and Keitt I got rid off b/c the fungus problems.  Not as bad, but far from good are: Malika, Nam Doc Mai, Valencia Pride, Maha, Venus

MANGOJOY

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 83
    • CORAL SPRINGS
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #23 on: August 29, 2023, 12:48:15 PM »
Dupuis Saigons were very clean.

DocTropical

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 34
    • Orlando, FL USA - 9b
    • View Profile
Re: the MOST anthracnose and disease resistant mango's
« Reply #24 on: August 29, 2023, 12:52:02 PM »
Yoskiówhere did you get your Angie tree? Have been looking for a decent sized one but canít find them. Im in central florida.

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk