Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Topics - Epicatt2

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4
26
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Help - Is it too late to top my guava?
« on: May 28, 2021, 02:09:49 AM »
Is it too late to top my guava 'Ruby Supreme'?  It's gotten to about eight feet tall and the June bloom season is coming soon.

So, if I were to lop off about three to four feet off the top right now, leaving the plant about four or five feet tall, would it still fruit?  It has not begun to flower as of yet.

It's in sandy Florida soil with about six inches of leaf mulch over that.

Advice?  Suggestions?

Paul M.
==

27
How should ilama seeds be treated before planting for best germination, if:

1]  they are very recently harvested (within a mont or two), or . . .

2]  if they were harvested the previous season (like three or four months earlier)?

Is a hot water soak advised and allowing them to remain overnight soaking after the hot water has cooled down?

Or should they just be planted and trust to luck?

Enquiring minds and all that ...

Paul M.
==

28
I got a Eugenia stipitata last year from TT.  It grew well 'til this past cold season then got some leaf burn and lost the first few buds it was starting.

I understood that this species is supposed to bloom year round as long as it remains warm.  Now that it is warm again it's growing well but so far no buds or blooms.

To encourage blooming does this species benefit from fertilizing?  Or extra water?  Or a drying off period?  Or maybe it's just seasonal after all.

Anyone on here who's growing this species:  How do you get yours to bloom and set fruit for you?

Mine's in a 7-gallon pot and in mostly full sun.  Gets plenty of water.

Cheers!

Paul M.
==

29
Tropical Fruit Discussion / 'Egg of the Sun' mango . . .
« on: May 13, 2021, 06:17:58 PM »
(snip) Do they ripen and taste normal? Perhaps these could generate as much interest as the Egg of the Sun mangos??

How does the 'Egg of the Sun' cultivar fit in with the deformed or bizarrely shaped mangos discussed in an earlier thread?

Isn't 'EotS' cultivar the same as 'Irwin'?  Somewhere I read that 'Irwin' is 'the most expensive mango in the world'.  Why would that be the case.  I cannot find anywhere where it explains why.

Just curious . . .

Paul M.
==

30
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Abius - In shade or out in sun, when?
« on: May 13, 2021, 05:08:44 AM »
My abius are in half gallon pots and are about 8 to 10 inches tall.

They seem healthy enough but I've kept them pretty shady.  They are recovering from being very recently moved up into their larger (1/2 gal.) pots and are just starting to show some new leaf growth.

How soon would it be advisable to start moving the abius into brighter sunlight –or at least into less shade?

And as a tangential question, I have several green sapotes, also currently being kept in 50% shade.  They are about 12 to 14 inches tall and sturdy.  When should I start to increase their sunlight?

Suggestions, advice, please . . .

Paul M.
==

31
As Pouterias go how do these stack up for ease of culture in 9b and
for quality/flavor of fruit?:

Ross  /  Butterscotch  /   Alano  /  etc.

VS

Pouteria viridis

Just curious.

Paul M.
==

32
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Problem with 'Sabará' – need advice!
« on: April 22, 2021, 01:00:39 AM »
A sabará was received in late summer of 2020 in a three gallon pot and was about two feet tall and a foot and a half in diameter.  Seemed perfectly healthy and grew new leaves so no concerns with it.

Suddenly early in March all its leaves dried up and turned a light brown but did not fall from the plant which always seems a bad sign.  Only a few very tiny green leaves remained at the tips of some of the branches.

Then I began to water it more and in about two weeks all the dead leaves began to drop and new leaves started to grow.  Now the sabará is all lush and green again.

So..... 

Is this typical of sabará during winter time?

Should it by now –closing on a year after its receipt– be moved up into a five gallon pot?

I want to put it into the ground but don't know how large these get in zone 9b in Florida, especially in my sandy soil.

Suggestions, please & advice . . . .

Paul M.
==

33
Just ordered several seedling of this species.  So, were four seedlings enough? 

I recently read that this species is dioecious but am now wondering whether the species is strictly so, or whether some individuals produce perfect fowers –or maybe in some casses produce flowers of each sex together on one individual?

Enquiring minds and all that rot.

TIA

Paul M.
==

34
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Pineapple Anonna setting fruit . . . .
« on: April 19, 2021, 03:36:28 AM »
Got this thing from TT in Nov.'20.  It was in a 1 gal. pot.  In early March it got moved up into a 3 gal. pot and was shortly put out into more sunlight.

Now after about six weeks in the larger pot I discovered that it has set half a dozen fruits which are already the size of a marble.  The 'tree' is closing on three feet tall.  Had no idea that these could be so precocious.

Hopefully it will hold some of the fruit and I'll get to try them.  Of course they may be unsatisfactory as others on here have warned that this may just be a yellow-fleshed A. glabra and not especially tasty, but we shall see.

I also have an A. montana which is still in a one gal. pot, also from TT.  Guess it may also benefit from being moved up into a three gal., but will it fruit?  If a move into a larger pot encourages it to do so will let you know.

Cheers!

Paul M.
==

35
The one fruit on my Canistel, a 'Trompo' fell off sometime Monday during a rain storm and I found it lying on the leafmulch in the flower bed next to the tree.  The stem end of the fruit had split a little and a of bit old, wet leafmulch got into the little splits in the skin near where the stem had separated.

Took the fruit into the house and gently rinsed the leaves off the fruit and put it into the 'fridge.  But I am not sure that it should be left in the 'fridge overnight.  The 'fridge is set about about 40ºF.

The fruit is quite soft so I wasn't comfortable leaving it out on the kitchen table cuz I don't want it to go bad on me.  There doesn't seem to be any latex apparent due to the skin breaks, so I guess that means that it is ripe.  But maybe if it is wrapped loosely in some soft paper toweling it can be left out on the table overnight.

This is the first canistel that I've had ripen on the tree and it fell off sooner than expected.  Need to know the best way to keep it 'till it is ready to eat.  The skin is bright yellow with just the very slightest hint of orange color. 

Will I need to use it quickly?  How soon??

Comments?  Suggestions??

TIA

Paul M.
==

36
My three mango cultivars, all in 7 gallon pots had no problems wth the cold here in Tampa this winter.  They each made flower spikes in early March, but . . .

The 'Irwin' made one infloresence that got knocked off accidentally and it did not bother to throw out another one.

The 'Beverly', the tallest one of the three at 6 to 7 feet, threw a terminal inflorescence and one lateral and bloomed profusely but set no fruit.

The 'Ice Cream' made about six modest sized inflorescences and set about ten fruit between them.  They are small, only the size of English peas at the tme if this writing and look okay but I don't know if they will all hold. This is my first experience with trying to grow mangoes here in Tampa so I am keeping my fingers crossed that 'Ice Cream' will hold these few fruit.

I don't expect any fruit on the other two cultivars since the flowers are all finsihed and have dropped.

So far my mango trees' leaves are blemish free and the plants appear happy. But since this is my first foray into growing mangoes I would welcome any cultural advice y'all might could offer to a rank mango newbie.

Cheers!

Paul M.
=

37
"Amazon River Fruits"; paperback; Missouri Botanical Gardens Press; pub. 2007.

This book describes a number of interesting fruits found in the western Amazon Basin, various of which are not widely –if at all– in cultivation.  Many useful photos of these fruits are included, a surprising number of which are palms.

But species from a large number of other fruit families are also covered in this volume.

One species that is covered in this book and which may be of interest to others is Rollinia mucosa (syns. R. deliciosa; Annona deliciosa) with a discussion of its habitat and its popularity with the indigenous peoples of the basin as a dooryard fruit tree. The text eplains how the fruits of this species differ depending upon the area of the Basin they are being grown in.  The habitat descriptions for this particular species as covered in this volume will be instrumental for those of us TFF Members who wish to successfully grow this species which is called in Portuguese, 'biribá'.

Those interested in growing the biribá will find it on page 34-35 of this volume.

I have been given to understand that this book may go out-of-print soon so, just a word to the wise.

Paul M.
==

38
For those of us where space matters and who have only a city lot to grow our tropical fruit on, which would be some ideally recommended mango cultivars that are dwarf, semi-dwarf, or Condo options? 

This would be for zone 9b and let's estimate that only three or four smaller mango trees would be the max that could fit on the lot (along with all the other stuff).

Ideally cultivars which are precocious, have decent flavor, and aren't prima donnas about culture and are not prone to disease would be ideal. Also it would be helpful to have cultivars which have their ripening times spread out over the season.

Suggestions?

TIA

Paul M.
==

39
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Improving Pond Apple — Any Attempts?
« on: February 26, 2021, 11:38:31 PM »
With the various comments and discussions over time ref Annona glabra (Pond apple) here on TFF, I've got to wondering whether anyone has ever taken this taxon in hand and seriously tried to improve it.

Improvement perhaps by means of the crossing of any of the better tasting individuals, or by out-crossing A. glabra with related species of Annona that have decent flavor.

Of course there is that one costarrican variety called 'Golden Sugar Apple' or 'Golden Honey Sugar Apple' which is considered by many as just a random variety of pond apple.

I guess what I'm mostly wondering is whether A. glabra has potential enough to be worth trying to improve. (I'm guessing, of course, that those aligators in the 'Glades that eat the fruit in the wild are satisfied with the status quo of this species.)

Cheers!

Paul M.
==

40
Yesterday I discovered that my three mango cultivars are all initiating flowerspikes for the first time.

I have 'Beverly', 'Ice Cream', and 'Irwin' and all are in 7-gal. pots.  Each was chosen because it is either a dwarf or semi-dwarf tree.  'Beverly' is about 5 to 6 feet tall and ther other two are about four feet tall. 

I have not given them any fertilizer containing nitrogen, except one time in July or August and then it was a VERY SCANT application.

But with me still being a 'mango novice' and now that they are each pushing inflorescences, should these three mango cultivars be fertilized at all?  If so, with what?  And how much?  And when?

So, help please.

TIA

Paul M.
==

41
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Pruning 'Gefner' (and Annonas in general) . . .
« on: February 17, 2021, 07:06:34 PM »
My 'Gefner' has finally dropped all its leaves and with all the recent cool weather –and now lots of rain, too here in Tampa– it is just beginning to push/swell new leaves at all its nodes.

My tree is in a five gal. pot and is itself about 4 feet tall.  It has about 8 or so lateral/horizontal branches that are about 1 to 2 feet long and all of them are about 1/4-inch in diameter, or smaller.

I'm told that it is important to prune these side branches back to create sturdier growth for the coming season –but, trim off  about how much??  I'm thinking about leaving 6 to 8 inches after pruning all the side branches.

Does this sound about right to all our Annona fans out there?

TIA

Paul M.
==
PS - Should I prune my biribá, sugar apples, and my Ilama the same way once their leaf buds start swelling?
==

42
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Pruning 'Gefner' (and Annonas in general) . . .
« on: February 17, 2021, 10:38:32 AM »
My 'Gefner' has finally dropped all its leaves and with all the recent cool weather –and now lots of rain, too here in Tampa– it is just beginning to push/swell new leaves at all its nodes.

My tree is in a five gal. pot and is itself about 4 feet tall.  It has about 8 or so lateral/horizontal branches that are about 1 to 2 feet long and all of them are about 1/4-inch in diameter, or smaller.

I'm told that it is important to prune these side branches back to create sturdier growth for the coming season –but, trim off  about how much??  I'm thinking about leaving 6 to 8 inches after pruning all the side branches.

Does this sound about right to all our Annona fans out there?

TIA

Paul M.
==
PS - Should I prune my biribá, sugar apples, and my Ilama the same way once their leaf buds start swelling?
==

43
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Blooming Annonas in pots . . .
« on: January 28, 2021, 07:44:08 PM »
Apart from Sugar Apples, which Annonas would be better for in-pot culture and fruiting?

What I have are:

  Annona diversifolia (Ilama)
  A. deliciosa (Biribá)
  A. montana
  A. salzmannii
  A. (poss.) glabra (that 'golden'(?) sugar apple thing from CR)
  Atemoya 'Gefner'
  Atemoya 'Pierce'

Any comments from our forum members' on any such experiences growing Annonas in pots in  9b would be appreciated.

Cheers!

Paul M.
==

44
Here in Tampa (9b) we are forecast to have a low of 37ºF on SAT morning after Xmas.

Wondering who has had experience with low temps with the following several tropical fruit trees:

~ Meiogyne cylindrgcarpa (Fingersop)  -  1 ft tall n 1 gal pot
~ Murraya koenigii (Curryleaf)  - 14" tall in 1 gal pot
~ Rollinia deliciosa (Biribá)  -  1 in 7-gal pot @ 5 ft tall w/ 1-1/2 dia trunk; 2 others in 1 gal pots 18" tall w/ 3/16" stems
~ Pouteria viridis (Green sapote) - 4 of 'em in 1 gal pots about 10" to 12" in tall

Not real sure about the above so am asking, in Y'all's experience should these make it thru 37ºF without any damage or should they be brought inside?

Will move the abius and P. tomentosa inside as well as my Eugenia stipatata which all have withstood as low as 41ºF and 45º, too, several times.

All the citrus and mangos will stay outside this time 'round, including Eugenias candolleana, calycina, selloi, plus one large fruiting sized Pitangtuba.  Not so sure about the Pitombas, which are still small 8" to 10" tall-but-sturdy seedlings.

How about an ilama, a 'Gefner' and sugar apple  (all in 5 gal.)?  Stay out or go inside at 37º?

This is my first year of really testing for cold tolerances in a number of things which I did not have last year at this time.

Fingers X-ed!

Paul M.
==

45
I have four seedling cambucás (Plinia edulis) in one gallon pots and they make nice new leaves but then later after they are mature for about a month the leaves very slowly start to die back at the edges.

They have been fertilized occasionally, but at 1/4-strength with water-soluble fertilizer.

What does this leaf-burn sound like? (Sorry but have no photos.)  Is it that they are over sensitive to solute in the water?  Do they need to be flushed with water more?  Would they maybe benefit from being put into into an extra deep pot to offer more root run?  Or what . . .  ?

Any advice or help would be welcome.

Cheers!

Paul M.
==

46
Here in Tampa I have up-'til-now left all my tropical fruit outside.  A few are in the ground but most things are in pots, and not yet large enough to plant out. The temperature in my yard this season so far has dropped overnight on several occasions into the 50s, and the upper-40s but finally dropped to the low-40s on Nov 30th. This has served as a cold-tolerance test for me and I'm sharing it with folks on here.

Up 'til Nov 30th's very chilly drop, everything was fine out-of-doors without evidencing any effects from the overnight temperatures. But there was some reaction from a few things on Nov 30th when overnight my thermometer registered a low of 40 or 41ºF.  Here's a rundown of the things that were affected in some way or other:

Showing some damage was a seedling Musa 'Kokopo' with a new leaf just expanding which got 'burnt' just along the edges of its newly unrolling leaf's margins.  (A seedling Musa 'Veinte Cohol' right next to it was unfazed.)  They were both sitting under a pergola covered with Petrea volubilis (sandpaper vine) providing decent protection over the top of the pergola.  (BTW the Petrea is starting to cover itself with dozens of spikes of its purple flowers, which normally it does in March.)

A Dwarf Ylang-Ylang and an Ylang-Ylang Vine (= 2 different species) both got a little wilty at 41ºF. but have now recovered.  They were under the canopy provided by a Blood Banana (Red) leaf, which itself was unaffected.

One Annona salzmannii (Beach Sugar Apple) seedling lost an expanding new leaf and it, and a second one, showed some stress and spots of partial leaf death. They both had droopy, stressed-looking leaves but now seem to be recovering.  I'll definitely move them in next time it turns this cold.

Eugenia stipitata (Araça-boi) in a 7 gallon pot had a flush of new, bronzy leaves all over it and several flower buds.  It has been fine up 'til Monday's 41ºF. when the whole plant looked wilty.  But in the following two days it seems to have recovered and its leaves are turgid again.  I'll protect this one if it's going to get down near 41ºF. again.

A number of Abiu seedlings (5) were under the pergola and seemed to be OK, being surrounded by other vegetation plus with the pergola's Petrea vine covering.  But three Abius that I recently sprouted from seed (from another TFF Member six weeks ago) were on my front porch which faces north. Those wound up with slightly flaccid leaves.  Their leaves have recovered since Monday.  They will get moved in if it is to get any colder than 45F. again here.

A number of Garcinia livingstonei (Imbu) seedlings about 10-inches tall were fine except one or two which had small, newly-expanding leaves which got 'burnt' by the cold.  Otherwise they were unfazed.

Other Annonaceæ (A. squamosa, A. diversifolia), a Rollinia deliciosa, and an Atemoya 'Gefner' are all showing some yellowing of their leaves and some leaf drop, but that is expected at this time of year.  The Rollinia and Atemoya leaves are all looking somewhat droopy.  Guess they are now starting their seasonal shutdown for this cool time.  And Meiogyne clindrocarpa (Fingersop) sat exposed in a one gallon pot, showed no ill-effects and remained looking as happy as ever, which is great to know!

Three mangoes in 7 gallon pots at about 4 to 5 feet tall were completely unaffected, as was everything else that was left outside, including among others, Achiote, Canistel, Guava, CotRG, Grumichama, Jaboticaba 'Sabará'; several each Pitangatubas, Pitombas, E. calycinas, and Rainforest Plums; Pouteria  viridis and P. lucuma, several White Sapotes, and of course various citrus.

Passiflora eduliis fma. flavicarpa and P. edulis v. edulis, both climbing exposed along a chainlink fence, remained unaffected at 41ºF., Halla-Loo!

I share this narrative about my collection and how various things reacted to or remained unfazed by the recent coldsnap, hoping that it might be useful to some newer TFF Members who may be trying to decide what will grow and survive the cold weather that we experience here in Tampa, zone 9b.  BTW, I'm located in Seminole Heights on top of a broad hill about three miles north of Tampa Bay which seems to avoid being a colder spot. 

My intention in creating a food/fruit forest has been to choose primarily semi-tropical species which can take the amount of cold that we normally expect in zone 9b but of course we all know that there are certain things that we just cannot seem to live without but which are a bit less cold-tolerant, so some of those get added to our collections anyway.  (Hey, don't blame me for zone pushing a little!)

OK — HTH

Cheers!

Paul M.
==

47
Tropical Fruit Discussion / An IMBE inquiry – cold tolerance?
« on: November 28, 2020, 01:35:57 PM »
Imbe – Garcina livingstonei– and its cold tolerance was discussed on here recently.

I have several seedlings that I got early last year.  They were potted up right away together 3 seedlings ea. to a 5 gallon pot in a 1:1:1 mix of builders sand:milled sphagnum:leaf mold. Then they sat for nine months(!) and did absolutely nothing.  But now they've all started to grow and are about 10 inches tall. (Only two of them didn't make it, out of ten.)

They are reported to be good in zone 9b with the cold we usually get here but my question is: When would it be safe to plant them out in the yard?  Does 10 inches tall seem big enough for them to survive a frost or very light freeze if we were to get one this winter? Or do I need to wait 'til they're larger?

Hoping that someone who is growing this species will have some experiences –aside from the flavor– to offer up about when it would be safe to plant these seedlings out in the ground.  Will they take full sun, or will they want to be shaded until they get established?  They seem quite sturdy even at this small size.

TIA

Paul M.
==

48
I've been reading about the self-incompatibility of Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa and am unclear about an aspect of this taxon's pollination requirements.

Does it require pollnation by a different species of passiflora or would pollination by different individuals of Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa  be successful?

If Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa does require a different species for pollination success are there limits to which species it is compatible with?  For instance, I have vines of volunteers of Florida's native P. suberosa in my yard which has very small flowers.  Would pollen from that native species be compatible with Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa to produce fruit?  Or will a larger flowered passiflora be necessary?  (I'm assuming that the bees in my yard will visit both species.)

I've searched for a couple hours but did not find anything particularly illuminating online!  [ sigh ]

Any advice appreciated.

Paul M.
=

49
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Luc's Garcinia - cold tolerances . . .
« on: November 14, 2020, 02:11:57 AM »
A number of Forums Members have discussed growing Luc's Garcinias on the Forums for a few years now.

What has been your experience with them vs cold weather in, say, zone 9b?

How large do they seem to need to get before they start to show some cold tolerance?

I have several Luc's that I'd lke to plant out but they are only about a foot tall with ten or so pairs of leaves and they are in 1 gallon pots with the roots just now starting to creep out thru the drainage holes of their pots.  So I think that they are maybe about ready to plant out but I'm not sure.  (Anyway, surely by next March.)

If planted out now I figure that if need be I can cover them well if we get some cold weather and they should make it thru a couple degrees of a light freeze if it is brief.

Suggestions?  Advice?

TIA

Paul M.
==
PS — I also have G. intermedia and G. brasiiensis that are about the same height as the Luc's and in 1 gallon pots.
==

50
This is one aggressive Passiflora species!  Was purchased on Feb 2 in a 2-inch pot that had three small seedlngs in it.

In April they were big enough that they needed to go into a larger pot so the three vines went together into a 3 gallon pot.

When they started makng tendrils in June they were plunged, with them still in the pot, a third of the way into the soil next to an eight-foot long section of chainlink fence.  Earth was built up  four inches deep around the exposed bottom part of the plunged pot and held in place with a circular concrete  border.  The vines were threaded thru the chainilnk of the fence section. Once the vines had grabbed onto the fencing they were pinched back so they would branch.  They were watered enough to keep them from wilting but not fertilized. And they took off growing!

By the middle of October the vines had grown to the length of the fencing with several terminal ends hanging loose in the air looking for more fence.  Now I'm kinda glad I isolated these vines on a free standing section of fencing.

Then by November 6th there were buds all over the vines and yesterday (11/10) there were eight or more flowers open.  Now let's see if it will set any fruit, which if it does may not be ripe before the cooler weather sets in here.

So I am wondering if I should expect these vines to even set any fruit so soon after their first flowering.  There are three of them together from seed to offer cross-pollnation.  Should that do it?

Cheers!

Paul M.
==

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4
SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk