Author Topic: sunburn from led lights?  (Read 4057 times)

incubator01

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Re: sunburn from led lights?
« Reply #25 on: May 10, 2022, 05:30:40 PM »
Thousands of citrus trees in Florida are grafted upon Carrizo. The humidity in Florida reaches up to 100%.

but florida doesn't have cold temperatures in the winter / spring like Belgium. ther's the difference
Florida is citrus heaven, Belgium is not. As much as I wanted to grow other kinds here,  I just can't. Unless I invest in a complete isolated controlled environment.
So I have to stick with certain rootstocks and certain scions that are more resistant to our climate.
So far Yuzu & Shikuwasa are proving to be very successful here.
Poncirus by itself too, but mine doesn't seem to grow new leaves yet, probably because oscar tintori sawed off a lot of the thicker branches for grafting purposes.

poncirsguy

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vesteronys

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Re: sunburn from led lights?
« Reply #27 on: May 30, 2022, 05:37:08 PM »
Artificial lights typically don't emit any significant amount of ultraviolet light, and visible light isn't energetic enough to cause damage, so any sunburn would have to come from infrared light or heat. LED lights don't generate a lot of that either. This would be much more of a concern with incandescent bulbs. The lights you linked aren't particularly strong. With those, you'd probably have to be almost in direct contact with the plants to cause any damage. My room is full of plants, and I got more powerful LEDs from https://lightingandsupplies.com, but they didn't get damaged at all.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2022, 06:06:26 PM by vesteronys »

mollyparsum

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Re: sunburn from led lights?
« Reply #28 on: July 03, 2022, 05:31:17 PM »
The LED is not in any way affecting your nagami kumquat seedlings. Many companies and individuals grow their plants, seedlings, flowers, and sometimes even crops using only LED lights. The reason is most probably from the soluble salts or other fertilization methods you use. My neighbor is obsessed with micro plants and is growing a few different kinds of them in his basement. Besides the LED lamps he arranged around the basement, he has also installed several smart light bulbs. I am not sure what exactly their purpose is lol but he seems to like them. As long as it makes you happy, buddy! Haha.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2022, 08:38:45 AM by mollyparsum »

1rainman

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Re: sunburn from led lights?
« Reply #29 on: August 04, 2022, 04:55:59 AM »
Yep 100% humidity and sun so powerful it will burn your skin in 15 minutes if you are pale and citrus like it. But citrus don't like sitting in wet soil. It's good to add some sand to the potting soil. They can dry out quite a bit between watering with no problem but damp wet swamp soil they don't like. Don't like mulch. Here in Florida yes high humidity and rains a lot but the dirt is sand so roots dry out between watering and also hot so it dries quickly. A seedling needs zero fertilizer. They will sprout in pure sand. You can fertilize heavy once the plant is big.

1rainman

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Re: sunburn from led lights?
« Reply #30 on: August 04, 2022, 05:03:17 AM »
There is a lot of variation in what citrus can handle the cold. Dwarf Meyer lemon is perfect for the north. Bring inside when temps go below freezing otherwise it does great. I had lemons in Ohio. It's small enough to grow in a large container and move inside in the winter. I used grow lights in winter.

Some citrus need hot temperature though. Lemons do not like cold but Meyer lemon is only 3/4 lemon. Nobody knows exactly but thought to be 1/8 grapefruit which is very cold hearty 1/8 tangerine and 3/4 lemon. I can eat these lemons they are only slightly sour due to being part orange or whatever. By far the best citrus for the north. I had a tangerine that did well but got too big. Grapefruit is probably the easiest citrus to grow that is good to eat in my opinion or a tangelo half grapefruit half tangerine. Or the Meyer lemon.

incubator01

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Re: sunburn from led lights?
« Reply #31 on: August 04, 2022, 05:46:47 PM »
There is a lot of variation in what citrus can handle the cold. Dwarf Meyer lemon is perfect for the north. Bring inside when temps go below freezing otherwise it does great. I had lemons in Ohio. It's small enough to grow in a large container and move inside in the winter. I used grow lights in winter.

Some citrus need hot temperature though. Lemons do not like cold but Meyer lemon is only 3/4 lemon. Nobody knows exactly but thought to be 1/8 grapefruit which is very cold hearty 1/8 tangerine and 3/4 lemon. I can eat these lemons they are only slightly sour due to being part orange or whatever. By far the best citrus for the north. I had a tangerine that did well but got too big. Grapefruit is probably the easiest citrus to grow that is good to eat in my opinion or a tangelo half grapefruit half tangerine. Or the Meyer lemon.

All of this depends on the rootstock.
Anything grafted on macrophylla or volkarmerian will die here, my pursha lemon on macrophylla recovered transplant shock but is now struggling to grow, despite well draining soil and dry conditions, it's pretty clear it wont survive another winter here.

I will no longer buy anything on those rootstocks.
Same with carrizo, too sensitive

Seedlings can get a very diluted version of food once they're a year old, been doing this now with great success in combination with a grow light.
They grow like mad.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2022, 09:23:14 AM by incubator01 »

1rainman

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Re: sunburn from led lights?
« Reply #32 on: August 04, 2022, 08:46:02 PM »
My Meyer lemon wasn't on any root stock. Generally root stock would get too big for a container and be root bound. Dwarf Meyer lemon only grew as big as the container and was healthy. Though it got fruit when in a big pot. It's the only one small enough for me to grow in a container and bring indoors.

 

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