Author Topic: Monstera deliciosa  (Read 7917 times)

siafu

  • 10a, Algarve, Portugal
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 463
    • View Profile
Monstera deliciosa
« on: July 08, 2012, 05:52:45 AM »

Hi,

My Monstera deliciosa fruits have been sitting in the plant for a year or more.
They seem to have stopped growing quite long ago, but show no signs of
ripening. They are still hard as rocks.

Am I supposed to pick them green?
Srgio Duarte
Algarve, Portugal

--Vale sempre a pena, quando a alma no pequena!

Jackfruitwhisperer69

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2411
  • Zone 11b
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2012, 08:54:42 AM »
Hi Srgio,

If you want your mouth full of microscopic spines :o...go for it ;D ;D ;D

Let them to fully ripen and start to plump up...you can pick them. Don't peel the whole fruit all at once...the fruit will do it for you at it's own pace ;)

They are one of my favorite fruits...AWESOME :)
Time is like a river.
You cannot touch the same water twice, because the flow that has passed will never pass again.
Enjoy every moment of your life!

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9621
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2012, 09:08:37 AM »
I will echo Steven's response and go a bit further for clarification.  First, ripen does not necessarily mean ready to eat (I have never seen them ready to eat right off the vine).  Ripen means ready to harvest (you should harvest when the fruit gets a little lighter green in color and the base of the fruit swells and will bulge a little with some very slight separation and yellowing at the outline of the hard "plates"), where you will let them sit on your counter till it becomes ready to eat (which usually occurs in sections).  You should only eat the portions where the "plates" fall off or are easily flicked off (for a better term).  Just scrape the luscious fruit off the core.  There are tricks to speed up ripening or to try and get the whole thing to ripen at once (but in paper/plastic bag or wrap in foil) but be careful as the flesh can go quickly from ripe to fermented.

From Julia Morton:

"Season

Flowering and fruiting overlap because it requires 12 to 14 months from the opening of the inflorescence to the maturity of the fruit. Therefore, there are often unopened inflorescences, immature fruits and ripening fruits together on the same plant. The current year's crop is ripening through summer and fall while the following year's crop is forming beside it.

Harvesting

The rind is always green though it assumes a lighter shade as the fruit matures. The fruit, with at least an inch (2.5 cm) of stem, should be cut from the plant when the tile-like sections of rind separate slightly at the base, making it appear somewhat bulged. At this state, the fruits have been shipped to local or distant markets. If kept at room temperature, the ceriman will ripen progressively toward the apex over a period of 5 or 6 days. The flesh should be eaten only from that portion of the fruit from which the rind segments have so loosened as to be easily flicked off. To ripen the whole fruit at one time, it should be wrapped in paper or plastic, or possibly aluminum foil, as soon as cut from the plant and kept at room temperature until the rind has loosened the entire length of the fruit. At this stage, it will be found that the flesh also falls easily away from the inedible core. Once ripened, the fruit can be kept in the refrigerator in good condition for a week or a little more. Rinsing off the floral remnants improves the appearance of the flesh, but it does cause some loss of juice."
- Rob

siafu

  • 10a, Algarve, Portugal
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 463
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2012, 04:09:06 PM »

Thanks.

I've noticed the base of some fruits is indeed bulging.
Moreover, some of the scales can be pealed without too much effort.

I'll wait a couple more weeks.
Srgio Duarte
Algarve, Portugal

--Vale sempre a pena, quando a alma no pequena!

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9621
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2012, 06:50:12 PM »

Thanks.

I've noticed the base of some fruits is indeed bulging.
Moreover, some of the scales can be pealed without too much effort.

I'll wait a couple more weeks.
From what you just described, pick them NOW.
- Rob

siafu

  • 10a, Algarve, Portugal
  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 463
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2012, 07:50:39 AM »

Thanks.

I've noticed the base of some fruits is indeed bulging.
Moreover, some of the scales can be pealed without too much effort.

I'll wait a couple more weeks.
From what you just described, pick them NOW.

Will Do!
Srgio Duarte
Algarve, Portugal

--Vale sempre a pena, quando a alma no pequena!

Bass

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 34
    • Pennsylvania zone 6
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2012, 07:03:46 AM »
Does monstera grow and fruit Ina container? Is it worth growing?

Jackfruitwhisperer69

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2411
  • Zone 11b
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2012, 08:04:49 AM »
Hi Bass,
Monstera does grow well in a large pot...had one in South Africa, though has never flowered or produce fruit.

They grow very well here in the highlands and i have also seen a producing monstera at Sintra, in the Quinta da Regaleira. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quinta_da_regaleira never expected to see one there  :o
Time is like a river.
You cannot touch the same water twice, because the flow that has passed will never pass again.
Enjoy every moment of your life!

gunnar429

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3320
  • Nothing like fruit from your own yard!
    • West Park, FL 33023, Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2015, 02:40:46 PM »
Anyone have an updates/thoughts on growing this fruit?
~Jeff

"Say you just can't live that negative way, if you know what I mean. Make way for the positive day." - Positive Vibration

Finca La Isla

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2048
    • Costa Rica, Southern Caribbean coast
    • View Profile
    • finca la isla
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2015, 09:49:17 PM »
Monstera will grow along the ground very well but, in my experience, it is much more likely to flower and fruit when it is climbing up a tree or strong post.
Peter

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9621
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2015, 11:30:50 PM »
Anyone have an updates/thoughts on growing this fruit?

Jeff - fruit is excellent.   Have you never paid attention to the big patch growing on the ground under the Dot tree just behind the house at Excalibur?   Thrives sprwading on the ground and produces a lot of fruit.
- Rob

fisherking73

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 807
    • Hollywood (Broward county), Florida Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #11 on: April 09, 2015, 11:49:29 PM »
That area at Excalibur it is all waist to chest high and thick under a dark canopy. It is on my list to put as a hedge like feature in my front yard along with miracle fruit. The rest (besides avocado tree) will be the wifes pretty stuff. I told her nothing prettier than stuff you can eat lol. Usually gives flowers, then fruit, how can you beat that.  Luckily she likes the Monsteras look. We have not tried the fruit yet (a bit hesitant reading some of the stories lol) but atleast it will be an option.

HIfarm

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1145
    • Paukaa, HI, USA zone 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #12 on: April 10, 2015, 01:17:45 AM »
I haven't tried it both ways, side by side to see which is more productive, but it seems to fruit fine growing as a "groundcover".  The Hilo arboretum has a large patch growing at the base of a fig of some type & there is nearly always a lot of fruit present.  I have a couple of "small" cuttings* I have rooted & one of those is fruiting nicely.  I wouldn't think a tree or other support is a prerequisite to getting fruit from it.  I would be more skeptical of fruiting it in a pot as it does seem to need some size before it starts to produce  -- by that time, it will probably be tipping over any rational size pot.

John

*small is relative - the leaves are probably ~2 1/2' across

Monstera will grow along the ground very well but, in my experience, it is much more likely to flower and fruit when it is climbing up a tree or strong post.
Peter
« Last Edit: April 19, 2015, 08:47:20 PM by HIfarm »

bsbullie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9621
    • USA, Boynton Beach, FL 33472, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #13 on: April 10, 2015, 06:29:40 AM »
John - you are correct about fruiting equally on ground vs climbing.   You say you have a pkant with the leaf size in only 2.5 inches and its fruiting?  Can you please post a picture.  Never seen one with a leaf size that small with fruit.
- Rob

From the sea

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 690
    • Big Island Hawaii
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #14 on: April 10, 2015, 07:46:08 AM »
Mine has two fruit hanging right now, but i find it was slow to establish

fisherking73

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 807
    • Hollywood (Broward county), Florida Zone 10b
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #15 on: April 10, 2015, 10:57:11 AM »
We went to Fairchild this past week, and looked at   A LOT of M. Delish, and there it also seems to be doing VERY well in full shade/partial shade areas. And I found lots of fruits in all areas. Did not really note any growing up trees, probalby they keep em contained from doing that, so can't see if the tree climbers fruit any more or less. On a brighter note, I found a big patch of M. Delish on public property ;D

HIfarm

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1145
    • Paukaa, HI, USA zone 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #16 on: April 10, 2015, 02:25:36 PM »
Oops, I guess I hit the shift key when typing.  Yes, I would like to see one with a 2 1/2" leaf bearing fruit too.  It should have been 2 1/2'.

John

John - you are correct about fruiting equally on ground vs climbing.   You say you have a pkant with the leaf size in only 2.5 inches and its fruiting?  Can you please post a picture.  Never seen one with a leaf size that small with fruit.

Chandramohan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 792
    • India, Kerala, Wynad
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #17 on: April 19, 2015, 01:49:13 PM »
How soon does monstera seeds germinate?

KarenRei

  • Arctic Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1806
    • Reykjavk, Iceland
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #18 on: April 19, 2015, 07:50:29 PM »
Does monstera grow and fruit Ina container? Is it worth growing?

Monstera is actually often sold as a houseplant  :)

https://www.google.com/search?site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=902&q=monstera+plant&oq=monstera+plant&gs_l=img.3..0i19l7j0i30i19l2j0i5i30i19.446.3258.0.3376.14.13.0.1.1.1.167.1253.6j5.11.0.msedr...0...1ac.1.64.img..3.11.1114.AN0ynAmJDx4#tbm=isch&q=monstera+houseplant

Now, at normal houseplant light levels you'll never get any fruit, but to answer your question about whether you can grow them in a pot, absolutely.  :)  Heck, the way monstera grows, I'm not even sure you need the pot... half of my plant's roots are outside of mine  ;) 
« Last Edit: April 19, 2015, 07:52:32 PM by KarenRei »
J, g er a rkta surnar plntur slandi. Nei, g er ekki klikku. Jja, kannski...

starling1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 983
    • Queensland, Australia
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #19 on: April 19, 2015, 07:55:57 PM »
Does monstera grow and fruit Ina container? Is it worth growing?

Monstera is actually often sold as a houseplant  :)

https://www.google.com/search?site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=902&q=monstera+plant&oq=monstera+plant&gs_l=img.3..0i19l7j0i30i19l2j0i5i30i19.446.3258.0.3376.14.13.0.1.1.1.167.1253.6j5.11.0.msedr...0...1ac.1.64.img..3.11.1114.AN0ynAmJDx4#tbm=isch&q=monstera+houseplant

Now, at normal houseplant light levels you'll never get any fruit, but to answer your question about whether you can grow them in a pot, absolutely.  :)  Heck, the way monstera grows, I'm not even sure you need the pot... half of my plant's roots are outside of mine  ;)

They will fruit even in total shade Karen.

They are feral all over the place in my town. Fruit is just ok, not worth the hassle IMO owing to the little black hair things that stick to your tongue.

KarenRei

  • Arctic Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1806
    • Reykjavk, Iceland
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #20 on: April 20, 2015, 01:10:16 PM »
Does monstera grow and fruit Ina container? Is it worth growing?

Monstera is actually often sold as a houseplant  :)

https://www.google.com/search?site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=902&q=monstera+plant&oq=monstera+plant&gs_l=img.3..0i19l7j0i30i19l2j0i5i30i19.446.3258.0.3376.14.13.0.1.1.1.167.1253.6j5.11.0.msedr...0...1ac.1.64.img..3.11.1114.AN0ynAmJDx4#tbm=isch&q=monstera+houseplant

Now, at normal houseplant light levels you'll never get any fruit, but to answer your question about whether you can grow them in a pot, absolutely.  :)  Heck, the way monstera grows, I'm not even sure you need the pot... half of my plant's roots are outside of mine  ;)

They will fruit even in total shade Karen.

They are feral all over the place in my town. Fruit is just ok, not worth the hassle IMO owing to the little black hair things that stick to your tongue.

Really? I've never heard of anyone growing them as houseplants get fruit... but then again, maybe they just don't know what to look for  ;)  I've got mine growing in "shade", but it's the "shade" of a very bright room (my grow room)

By coincidence, I happened to run across a bunch for sale in Reykjavk today:



J, g er a rkta surnar plntur slandi. Nei, g er ekki klikku. Jja, kannski...

HIfarm

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1145
    • Paukaa, HI, USA zone 12b
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #21 on: April 20, 2015, 02:23:30 PM »
Part of this "shade" may be whether you are talking shade in a house or shade outside.  Shade outside is typically a lot brighter than you think (unless you are in a heavily canopied jungle type setting) & certainly a lot brighter than in a home.  So, most "shady" outdoor areas might be fine while indoor areas may not be.  So you can both be right.  :o)

John

Pancrazio

  • Off Tropic
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 910
  • Florence, Italy, USDA 8
    • Growing fruits in Florence, and Pratovecchio, Italy
    • View Profile
    • FruttAma.it
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #22 on: April 21, 2015, 04:26:43 PM »
Really? I've never heard of anyone growing them as houseplants get fruit... but then again, maybe they just don't know what to look for  ;)

I did hear a couple of stories. Apparently the plants does fruit only in big sized pots, and very sparingly. One of my anecdotes said once about every ten years. In the ground the plant does way better, but then again, there are few places where it can be grown in ground here in Italy. And most people are unaware that the fruit is edible, so this may have contributed to make anecdotes ever rarer.
Italian fruit forum

I want to buy/trade central asia apricots. Contact me in PM if interested.

KarenRei

  • Arctic Member
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1806
    • Reykjavk, Iceland
    • View Profile
Re: Monstera deliciosa
« Reply #23 on: April 22, 2015, 08:10:36 AM »
Really? I've never heard of anyone growing them as houseplants get fruit... but then again, maybe they just don't know what to look for  ;)

I did hear a couple of stories. Apparently the plants does fruit only in big sized pots, and very sparingly. One of my anecdotes said once about every ten years. In the ground the plant does way better, but then again, there are few places where it can be grown in ground here in Italy. And most people are unaware that the fruit is edible, so this may have contributed to make anecdotes ever rarer.

One thing that's kind of annoying for an indoor grower like me is that they like to sprawl out laterally and put down those big fat roots as they go. Fine it it's sprawling over a soil surface, not so helpful of a botanical trait when it's in a pot! Obviously it's in my best interests if all the roots would come from the base and just fill up the pot.  That said, whenever I water, I make sure to quickly spray the side roots; it's a concrete floor so it doesn't matter if it gets a bit wet.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2015, 08:16:12 AM by KarenRei »
J, g er a rkta surnar plntur slandi. Nei, g er ekki klikku. Jja, kannski...

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk