Author Topic: 10b - berries for cereal  (Read 1051 times)

TheVeggieProfessor

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10b - berries for cereal
« on: November 30, 2023, 10:24:07 AM »
I'm spending way too much money and using way too much plastic packaging getting my kids berries for their cereal. I'd like to grow some in my landscape, likely in a hedge. Many berries aren't productive down here, though (e.g., blackberries) or are reportedly bland (e.g., mysore raspberries).

Mulberries are good. Intense root system though. The space I have to plant is near my home's water main. Don't want to mess with that. Jamaican strawberry is good, but large tree.

What else might one consider?

Dimitry Fisher

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2023, 01:38:43 PM »
Physalis (various species) take little space and can be eaten fresh or dried.  I never tried drying them, but that's because I eat all of them before they have a chance to dry :)  Lycium (goji and others) dry well but are an acquired taste, so kids may not like them.  Fresh ones of the Lycium species I grow are bitter, but turn sweet when dried.  TL;DR:  solanacea family, but only the ones you're certain are not toxic.  They need to be fully ripe, and do your homework before trying any!  Some species in solanacea are toxic, so you need to be sure the ones you're growing are fine to eat.  Tomatoes and bell peppers are fine :)    Caveat emptor.

Jaboticaba45

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2023, 01:43:25 PM »
Mysore raspberry...Someone in FL should have more info on that.

Galatians522

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2023, 10:44:45 PM »
Physalis peruviana was the first one that came to mind ("Golden Berries"). They fruit fast and are nematode resistant as a bonus. Physalis won't fruit much over the summer in my experience. Mulberries and Mysore raspberries are good options, too. Mysore is a good berry. Its main problem is that it does not have the typical raspberry taste. I think it suffers greatly from being compared to its relatives. The other problem is the huge thorns.

Actually, just about any fruit can be cubed into cereal. Bananas, dragonfruit, and mango are great. Frozen mango cubes defrosted in a bowl of cereal are a real treat and can be pulled out of the freezer year round.

Galatians522

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2023, 11:03:00 PM »
Downy Rose Myrtle is another good berry for 10b. Unfortunately, it was too easy to grow and got labeled as an invasive. You might be able to locate a wild stand and help reduce the invasive tendencies by harvesting the fruit.  ;)

TheVeggieProfessor

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2023, 11:09:13 AM »
Thanks so much. Based on the two recommendations (and some of my initial research), I'll definitely be giving Physalis peruviana a try; especially since they are nematode resistant!

Aaron

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2023, 11:14:22 AM »
thai dwarf mulberry

Caesar

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2023, 12:21:31 PM »
Prime Ark Freedom blackberry has solidified its spot as my familyís favorite, very productive. I also grow mulberries, but havenít figured out the trick to get them to bear consistently. Low chill blueberries also do great, Iíve been fruiting Sunshine Blue, still waiting to see how Pink Lemonade does. Iíve also fruited Caroline, Joan J., and Double Gold raspberries, and am trialing Niwot and Ohioís Treasure. Iím also growing Domestic, Alpine and Vescana strawberry varieties.

The trick to temperate berries in the tropics is low chill (200 hours and under), and for caneberries in particular, primocane types (they fruit on current yearís growth, which has no chill requirement). For strawberries, Day-neutral types are more likely to fruit consistently.

Muni

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2023, 04:44:56 AM »
How's the flavour on the Double Gold raspberries?
Allow yourself to know, if you wish, that this is a multi dimensional communication.
See what happens.

Caesar

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2023, 07:33:14 AM »
How's the flavour on the Double Gold raspberries?

Havenít tried Ďem. So far it only fruited one small branch (itís a small potted plant), and the berries up and disappeared. If the birds got Ďem Iíll consider it ironic, since they donít bother any of my other berries (though I did lose a blueberry once). Iíve had the red raspberries reach over-ripeness and they were untouched by the birds.

Muni

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #10 on: December 02, 2023, 09:25:19 AM »
That's a good sign. Thank you for the reply.
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hin00n

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #11 on: December 02, 2023, 10:15:36 AM »
Second to the goji berries. They're very easy to take care of. I have crimson star goji, which is sweet fresh, still a bit of a funky taste though.

Caesar

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #12 on: December 02, 2023, 11:52:01 AM »
Iíve had mixed results with Goji Berries. Theyíre decently-flavored and worth growing, but Crimson Star doesnít seem to like my neck of the woods at all. I got a big cluster of plants that slowly dwindled. I have about four left, seemingly dormant, and I donít think theyíll recover. Same thing happened with Stardust, went dormant then rotted away.

Phoenix Tears actually grew well for me while I had it in a pot, and fruited for me too. Then I stuck it in the ground (heavy clay), and it dwindled and died as well. That was my first Goji, and if I were to try again, thatís the variety Iíd go with.

Caesar

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2024, 12:19:24 PM »
How's the flavour on the Double Gold raspberries?

I finally tried Ďem! Theyíre great, slightly peachy.




Muni

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2024, 09:34:23 AM »
Sweet! Thank you for the update. I love peach and peachy fruits. :)
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TheVeggieProfessor

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #15 on: January 14, 2024, 09:20:09 AM »
Prime Ark Freedom blackberry has solidified its spot as my familyís favorite, very productive. I also grow mulberries, but havenít figured out the trick to get them to bear consistently. Low chill blueberries also do great, Iíve been fruiting Sunshine Blue, still waiting to see how Pink Lemonade does. Iíve also fruited Caroline, Joan J., and Double Gold raspberries, and am trialing Niwot and Ohioís Treasure. Iím also growing Domestic, Alpine and Vescana strawberry varieties.

The trick to temperate berries in the tropics is low chill (200 hours and under), and for caneberries in particular, primocane types (they fruit on current yearís growth, which has no chill requirement). For strawberries, Day-neutral types are more likely to fruit consistently.

How many chill hours do you reliably get at your location? According to agroclimnate.org, I got about 4 chill hours last season.

Caesar

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #16 on: January 25, 2024, 02:25:54 PM »
How many chill hours do you reliably get at your location? According to agroclimnate.org, I got about 4 chill hours last season.

I live in the lowlands of Puerto Rico, so as far as Iím aware, we get 0 chill hours in my yard. It turns balmy in the winter, but thatís about it.

mcoambassador

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #17 on: January 25, 2024, 08:38:59 PM »
Prime Ark Freedom blackberry has solidified its spot as my familyís favorite, very productive. I also grow mulberries, but havenít figured out the trick to get them to bear consistently. Low chill blueberries also do great, Iíve been fruiting Sunshine Blue, still waiting to see how Pink Lemonade does. Iíve also fruited Caroline, Joan J., and Double Gold raspberries, and am trialing Niwot and Ohioís Treasure. Iím also growing Domestic, Alpine and Vescana strawberry varieties.

The trick to temperate berries in the tropics is low chill (200 hours and under), and for caneberries in particular, primocane types (they fruit on current yearís growth, which has no chill requirement). For strawberries, Day-neutral types are more likely to fruit consistently.
Iím trying Alpine strawberries here in central FL after reading this article: https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/HS1326

This past few years weíve gone blueberry picking at farms near Orlando and we LOVED the Kestrel variety. 

There are also various Eugenia that create vaguely cherry-like fruits of various sizes. Cherry of the rio grande, pitangatuba, pitomba, sweet uvaia, etc.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2024, 03:00:05 PM by mcoambassador »

Caesar

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Re: 10b - berries for cereal
« Reply #18 on: January 26, 2024, 04:36:36 PM »
Prime Ark Freedom blackberry has solidified its spot as my familyís favorite, very productive. I also grow mulberries, but havenít figured out the trick to get them to bear consistently. Low chill blueberries also do great, Iíve been fruiting Sunshine Blue, still waiting to see how Pink Lemonade does. Iíve also fruited Caroline, Joan J., and Double Gold raspberries, and am trialing Niwot and Ohioís Treasure. Iím also growing Domestic, Alpine and Vescana strawberry varieties.

The trick to temperate berries in the tropics is low chill (200 hours and under), and for caneberries in particular, primocane types (they fruit on current yearís growth, which has no chill requirement). For strawberries, Day-neutral types are more likely to fruit consistently.
Iím trying Alpine strawberries here in central FL after reading this article: https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/publication/HS1326

This past few years weíve gone blueberry picking at farms near Orlando and we LOVED the Krystal variety. 

There are also various Eugenia that create vaguely cherry-like fruits of various sizes. Cherry of the rio grande, pitangatuba, pitomba, sweet uvaia, etc.

I grew Reine des Vallees a few years back, and currently have an Attila plant growing, along with a a few plants of a tetraploid Mignonette clone. Alpines are some of the toughest strawberries Iíve grown, even under tropical, searing summer sun. They handled worse neglect than any of my common hybrid strawberries. Unfortunately, Iíve been having trouble germinating them lately, never mind getting them past the delicate seedling stage.

Iím collecting what seem to be the best Eugenias according to popular perception. I have a Grumichama and Pitangatuba in the ground (and one of the latter in a pot), a Cedar Bay Cherry (from Kevin Jones), in a pot, as well as several potted members each of Dasyblasta Pitanga, Orange CORG and Candolleana (all from AchetaDomestica). Also sprouting some Sweet Uvaia seeds I got from HuertasUrbanas.

My Strawberry Guava hasnít borne yet, but Iíve been harvesting some Red Hybrid Jaboticaba for a few years now, and itís practically an honorary berry as far as Iím concerned... Slightly tart (not tannic) skin, relatively soft chewable seeds and sweet pulp. Pop Ďem whole and enjoy. I only spit out the seeds if Iím propagating it, otherwise they donít bother me. My dad prefers not to chew the seeds though, so your mileage may vary.

 

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