The Tropical Fruit Forum

Tropical Fruit => Tropical Fruit Discussion => Topic started by: Tim on October 03, 2012, 01:04:53 PM

Title: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Tim on October 03, 2012, 01:04:53 PM
Lucuma, anyone?  I've been eating these the last couple days and still can't get enough.  Up until now I've only had fruits of unknown seedling canistels, edible but don't recall it tasting that great.  I know nothing in the taste dept in regards to other Pouterias out there.  These lucumas were very good eats.  Sweet (not overly sweet), moist, creamy texture and very rich taste.  Sort of like sweet potato, pumkin pie and a pinch of something I can't put my fingers on  ;D

Lucumas alongside Manila seedling mangoes, don't know what that Bishop's Cap doing in there  ;D
(http://s7.postimage.org/jdyq38hsn/20120930_105016.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/jdyq38hsn/)

(http://s7.postimage.org/46iqivpxz/20120930_105220.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/46iqivpxz/)

Slice of an overripe lucuma, still great  ;D
(http://s7.postimage.org/xzpqrhel3/20121003_073947.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/xzpqrhel3/)

(http://s7.postimage.org/6qedczdhz/20121003_074242.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/6qedczdhz/)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on October 03, 2012, 02:26:14 PM
Raw it taste like Maple syrup, pecan, canistel?

or if you mix with icecream in a blender...it renders the most amazing vegan cookie dough milk shake.

here's some fruits from Ben Poirier of Ca....A real nice guy...and a great fruit tree/fruit seller.

STRONGLY RECOMMENDED.  He he sells products with substances known to the state of CA, to be wholesome and delicious.


(http://s8.postimage.org/dj26rd5qp/pictures_adam_2011_November_28_053.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/dj26rd5qp/)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: luc on October 03, 2012, 02:26:25 PM
Great , I hope my tree will produce one day , not holding my breath...maybe too hot here...
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: nullzero on October 03, 2012, 02:32:30 PM
Tim,

Been saving the seeds? I would be interested in trading/buying some.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on October 03, 2012, 02:34:07 PM
Great , I hope my tree will produce one day , not holding my breath...maybe too hot here...

Hey Luc,

u know there's a few varieties..and one that is supposed to be better for the lowlands....I wonder what type u have??

I want the one that's for the low lands...and it was sacred because of the gold color of the skin.

here is a quote from my post about this earlier on the forum

If you can, locate the sacred lucuma, that grows in the low lands...the incas worship gold, and this lucuma has a gold color...it can be grown at lower elevations, and should be suitable for FL.

I think its called Lucuma de seda.
 here is a link...get me some seeds or scions now!

good luck...i don't think lucuma seeds are good to pass through your system! LOL better get permits.
http://www.ocfruit.com/files/LUCUMA.htm (http://www.ocfruit.com/files/LUCUMA.htm)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on October 03, 2012, 02:34:55 PM
Tim,

Been saving the seeds? I would be interested in trading/buying some.

STOP RIGHT THERE NULL

I GOT YOUR BACK!

I planted some seeds from those fruits in the pictures!

Maybe I can bare root and send u some plants??  I have a few.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Tim on October 03, 2012, 02:41:17 PM
Stephen - I do have the seeds, but getting them Adam is as good as any I suppose.  let me know

Tim,

Been saving the seeds? I would be interested in trading/buying some.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: nullzero on October 03, 2012, 02:52:31 PM
Tim,

Adam is going to help me out, thanks though for the fast response. Those Lucumas really look tasty!
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: littlegrower on October 03, 2012, 04:32:01 PM
Raw it taste like Maple syrup, pecan, canistel?

or if you mix with icecream in a blender...it renders the most amazing vegan cookie dough milk shake.

here's some fruits from Ben Poirier of Ca....A real nice guy...and a great fruit tree/fruit seller.

STRONGLY RECOMMENDED.  He he sells products with substances known to the state of CA, to be wholesome and delicious.


(http://s8.postimage.org/dj26rd5qp/pictures_adam_2011_November_28_053.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/dj26rd5qp/)
Okay, this sounds incredibly delicious!  :o Would it be possible to pay you extra to ship with the cornifolia, if you had a spare seedling?? I appreciate the consideration - Nikki :)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: cuban007 on October 03, 2012, 04:35:49 PM
Tim the Lucumas look great, good job!!! I have been looking for some Lucuma trees for awhile now. I spoke to Ben a couple of months back and if I remember correctly, he told me he did not have any available. Any other place here in SoCal that may have these available and/or close to a fruiting age???
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Tim on October 03, 2012, 06:16:42 PM
cuban007 - You can try contacting Bonita Creek Nursery but I haven't checked.  Sorry I can't help much on source for a mature tree.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fruitlovers on October 03, 2012, 07:25:14 PM
Great , I hope my tree will produce one day , not holding my breath...maybe too hot here...

Luc, that one you collected in Machu Pichu isn't likely to fruit at your elevation. You need to collect ones growing in the lowlands.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: JF on October 03, 2012, 07:56:56 PM
Tim the Lucumas look great, good job!!! I have been looking for some Lucuma trees for awhile now. I spoke to Ben a couple of months back and if I remember correctly, he told me he did not have any available. Any other place here in SoCal that may have these available and/or close to a fruiting age???

Cuban007

Papaya Tree Nursery has them. If you like Canistel you'll probably like Lucama. It taste like a compota de boniato , not very appetizing.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: cuban007 on October 03, 2012, 08:19:06 PM
Oye, I love Boniato. I hope it taste more like dulce de Boniato.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: JF on October 03, 2012, 08:24:35 PM
Oye, I love Boniato. I hope it taste more like dulce de Boniato.

LOL It's probably as chewy as dulce de boniato but not as good..
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Tim on October 03, 2012, 08:50:51 PM
Funny you mentioned that, David.  I just learned today some Vietnamese folks call canistel "lekima".

JF - chewy?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: BMc on October 04, 2012, 06:49:20 PM
Hi Tim,
Do you have any seeds left that you would be willing to sell and post?
The 'lucuma' in Australia are all messed up and most are seemingly just a bad strain of canistel, so getting some seed that I could actually count on as being from a real lucuma would be great.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Tim on October 04, 2012, 08:44:22 PM
BMc - sent you PM
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: JF on October 04, 2012, 09:06:08 PM
Funny you mentioned that, David.  I just learned today some Vietnamese folks call canistel "lekima".

JF - chewy?

I was refering to boniatillo (cuban dried yam)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Californiatropicals on October 04, 2012, 09:55:25 PM
 ;D BEAUTIFUL TIM!

Thanks for sharing. I've never tasted Lucuma.. However, from your description they sound similar to Mamey... and mamey are delicious!!!  I'd love to one day try green sapote.. I've heard it's tastier than mamey.

Out of curiosity.. did you grow those fruits yourself in zone 9b? 
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: BMc on October 04, 2012, 10:41:08 PM
They do look a lot like Green Sapote, but green when ripe, and not orange, rather ironically...
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fruitlovers on October 05, 2012, 12:19:06 AM
They do look a lot like Green Sapote, but green when ripe, and not orange, rather ironically...

Lucumas are yellow when ripe. Most green sapotes ripen up a bright orange.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Californiatropicals on October 05, 2012, 12:44:59 AM
They do look a lot like Green Sapote, but green when ripe, and not orange, rather ironically...

Lucumas are yellow when ripe. Most green sapotes ripen up a bright orange.

 I actually ordered green sapote seeds from you earlier this year.. lol.. after i placed an order someone was so generous as to give me a huge 5 foot tall green sapote.. which is now over 6 feet!   ;D
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Recher on October 06, 2012, 09:15:28 AM
The 'lucuma' in Australia are all messed up and most are seemingly just a bad strain of canistel, so getting some seed that I could actually count on as being from a real lucuma would be great.

NOT TRUE. FOR EXAMPLE I IMPORTED SCIONS OF LUCUMO FROM BILL WHITMAN THAT HE GOT FROM KONA. HE RAVED ABOUT IT. HE WAS RIGHT. HUGE FRUIT. NO FRUIT MAKES A BETTER MILKSHAKE..TO MY TASTE BUDS LIKE RUM ' RAISIN.

I AM GROWING CAMPECHIANA, OBOVATA, MULTIFLORA, VIRIDE, MAMMOSUM, TORTA (15CM TALL), 'ABIU', HYPOGLAUCA, 'ROSS', AND THE ONLY ONE NOT SURE ABOUT IS DOMINGENSIS. NOTE I REFUSE TO CALL MY PLANCHONELLAS POUTERIA
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Mike T on October 06, 2012, 09:48:38 AM
That is a good collection Recher.I think the diversity of canistel and lucuma forms has caused confusion.I have seen canistels labelled as lucumas and until visiting this site was not 100% clear.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Felipe on October 06, 2012, 11:10:01 AM
WOW Recher! That's a very nice pouteria collection! How would you describe the fruit of multiflora? Currently I have multiflora seedlings and grafted budwood, which came from Oscar...
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Recher on October 06, 2012, 09:18:46 PM
Ask Oscar...mine came from Mayaguez ag station ...jeez 30 or so years ago and still i wait for fruit. Think second class
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Mike T on October 06, 2012, 09:36:11 PM
30n years and no fruit it sounds like its genetic tree should be a stump.It would be worth hitting it with the micronutrients your soil is lowest in as well as the back of an axe.Maybe it is not the ideal climate for the particular tree and it is still waiting for the right cues.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fruitlovers on October 07, 2012, 04:50:50 AM
The 'lucuma' in Australia are all messed up and most are seemingly just a bad strain of canistel, so getting some seed that I could actually count on as being from a real lucuma would be great.

NOT TRUE. FOR EXAMPLE I IMPORTED SCIONS OF LUCUMO FROM BILL WHITMAN THAT HE GOT FROM KONA. HE RAVED ABOUT IT. HE WAS RIGHT. HUGE FRUIT. NO FRUIT MAKES A BETTER MILKSHAKE..TO MY TASTE BUDS LIKE RUM ' RAISIN.

I AM GROWING CAMPECHIANA, OBOVATA, MULTIFLORA, VIRIDE, MAMMOSUM, TORTA (15CM TALL), 'ABIU', HYPOGLAUCA, 'ROSS', AND THE ONLY ONE NOT SURE ABOUT IS DOMINGENSIS. NOTE I REFUSE TO CALL MY PLANCHONELLAS POUTERIA

That lucmo from Kona is probably from the Kainaliu experimental station. It is a huge fruit, but it is the dry floury type used in cooking, or processing, not for eating out of hand. There are also lucmos that are very moist and very nice to eat out of hand.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Recher on October 08, 2012, 09:29:29 AM
That lucmo from Kona is probably from the Kainaliu experimental station. It is a huge fruit, but it is the dry floury type used in cooking, or processing, not for eating out of hand. There are also lucmos that are very moist and very nice to eat out of hand.


Yes that's the one and why i use it only for milkshakes.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Xeno on January 20, 2013, 10:51:45 PM
Does anyone know if Lucuma can be grown in a 25 gallon container and fruit?
Can it produce fruit near the coast (I'm located 52 feet above sea level and five miles away from the beach)?
If grown by seed how long will it take to produce fruit?

I'm interested in buying a tree but I don't want to get it if I know it won't produce. I'm looking for information on how to grow this tree but there's hardly any info on the internet!!! Help me out guys please!
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fyliu on January 21, 2013, 04:20:03 AM
Yes, it'll fruit in that container. In fact, Alex Silber of Papaya Tree Nursery has some of his for sale trees with fruits on them.

Quail (San Diego Botanic) Gardens has a lucuma that holds fruit on it at all times of the year. It's 5 miles from the coast too.

I heard it fruits sometime after 8 years from seed.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Felipe on January 21, 2013, 12:02:48 PM
Yo Xeno!

In my climate and close to sea level lucuma perfoms very good. I would say the requirements are similar to chirimoya, for example. I don't have experience growing them in pots, but I think it shouldn't be a problem as long as the plant is grafted. I've seen poted plants with fruit.

My guess is a seedling would take the same time as an avocado to produce, production could be erratic. Get a grafted one...
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: JF on January 21, 2013, 08:47:14 PM
Does anyone know if Lucuma can be grown in a 25 gallon container and fruit?
Can it produce fruit near the coast (I'm located 52 feet above sea level and five miles away from the beach)?
If grown by seed how long will it take to produce fruit?

I'm interested in buying a tree but I don't want to get it if I know it won't produce. I'm looking for information on how to grow this tree but there's hardly any info on the internet!!! Help me out guys please!

check out the Fullerton Arboretum they have a huge fruiting lucuma and you can taste the fruits that fall off the tree.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: TREESNMORE on January 21, 2013, 09:20:53 PM
Is any one growing lucuma in florida
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on January 21, 2013, 09:50:44 PM
I have some, but I think they'd be better for rootstocks...I want the type that's from the lowlands and that makes moist fruits for eating out of hand.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: jez251 on January 22, 2013, 08:42:02 AM
Mike, I have a 2-year old plant. It's looking really nice at about a meter tall. Not sure how early they fruit, though, so don't know when it'll fruit, if at all.

Jaime
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Tomas on January 22, 2013, 07:01:38 PM
Hi Adam,

What do you mean by "lowlands"?

Tomas
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Xeno on January 22, 2013, 11:33:33 PM
Hi Adam,

What do you mean by "lowlands"?

Tomas
Apparently there are two different types of lucumas. The 'high' land type which has drier flesh and the 'low' land type which has a more moist flesh suitable for fresh eating.

Thanks for all the info guys. I'm kinda sad that there really isn't any good info on the web about this plant and how they grow it. Looks like I'll avoid a seedling lucuma because it takes too long to produce fruit.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fyliu on January 23, 2013, 01:39:36 AM
Just do the same with sapodilla: http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/sapodilla.html (http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/sapodilla.html)
Luckily lucuma grows a bit faster.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: heddysue on February 19, 2013, 06:39:48 AM
Hi Everyone,
I'm new to this forum :)
I have been looking for Lucuma seeds and stumbled upon you guys.
Nice meeting you all.
Does anyone know where I can get, buy or swap for some?
They are OK to import to Australia, but I don't know where to to buy them from.
I would especially like the sweet one, but would go either, have plenty of room to go both :)
Any suggestions?
Hey Recher you don't live far away, enjoying the rain? :)
Cheers
Heddy
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Jackfruitwhisperer69 on February 19, 2013, 07:56:20 AM
Já foste ;)

(http://s7.postimage.org/6q9s56sg7/IMG_0326.jpg) (http://postimage.org/image/6q9s56sg7/)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fyliu on February 19, 2013, 03:41:59 PM
Does anyone know where I can get, buy or swap for some?
They are OK to import to Australia, but I don't know where to to buy them from.
You'll have to find out of it's OK from your country, or Australian members here. Normally seeds are much less restricted than plants.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: BMc on February 19, 2013, 06:01:11 PM
Yes, they are fine to import.
try to get seeds from a few sources as they seem to vary quite a bit.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: ScottR on February 19, 2013, 09:32:05 PM
I have two Lucuma trees that have flowered for the past three years but I get no fruit set. ???Is there a way to tell the difference between highland and lowland cultivars without them fruiting?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fyliu on February 19, 2013, 10:38:41 PM
Scott, you could try hand pollinating to help them along. Tap the pollen off the flowers and then poke the middle stamens into some pollen. Pretty much like what you do for miracle fruits.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Jackfruitwhisperer69 on February 20, 2013, 06:50:59 AM
I have two Lucuma trees that have flowered for the past three years but I get no fruit set. ???Is there a way to tell the difference between highland and lowland cultivars without them fruiting?

Hi Scott,
Welcome to the club :'( My tree has been doing the same :o I wanted to hand pollinate, but never got to it :-[ On the positive side, my tree is growing great, after implementing what Oscar and Adam, suggest to do(fertilze the tree ;D )
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: nullzero on February 20, 2013, 12:29:14 PM
Does anyone know a source for the moist type in the US?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Recher on March 05, 2013, 02:07:28 PM
30n years and no fruit it sounds like its genetic tree should be a stump.It would be worth hitting it with the micronutrients your soil is lowest in as well as the back of an axe.Maybe it is not the ideal climate for the particular tree and it is still waiting for the right cues.

I GOT THIS PROBLEM WITH QUITE A FEW SPECIES. I AGREE IN MOST CASES IT WILL BE MICRO-NUTRIENTS. ALL TREES SHRUBS LOOK GREAT OTHERWISE. GET THE FLOWERS NOT THE SET.  I STARTED FERTILIZNG WITH RUSTICA PLUS THREE YEARS AGO. NONE THIS YEAR. LAST SEASON TWO SPECIES FRUITED THAT HAD NEVER. THIS WAS THE FINAL PROOF IT WAS MICRONUTRIENTS. ONE WAS DOVYAIS RHOMBIFOLIA (RIGHT NOW MY SECOND FAVOURITE dOVY AFTER THE MUCH UNER-RATED UMKOKOLO) AND THE OTHER NEW FRUITER  WAS.... SORRY MY BRAIN HAS TEMPORARILY CRASHED. I REALLY WANT MY 25+ MYRCIARIA FLORIBUNDA TO SET.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Tomas on March 19, 2013, 10:43:22 PM
Hi,

After reading about others who grow lucuma, I am beginning to think that 1 solitary lucuma tree may not be enough. I found several accounts of growers with only 1 tree at about 10 years old/8-9ft tall. One person only gets 1 fruit each year and other person only 2 fruits in 3 years. Any thoughts?

Tomas
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: JF on March 19, 2013, 10:51:02 PM
Hi,

After reading about others who grow lucuma, I am beginning to think that 1 solitary lucuma tree may not be enough. I found several accounts of growers with only 1 tree at about 10 years old/8-9ft tall. One person only gets 1 fruit each year and other person only 2 fruits in 3 years. Any thoughts?

Tomas

Hi Tomas
The Fullerton Arboretum has single mature Lucuma tree that is always loaded with fruits. You should check with Alex at Papaya Nursery his father was the one who donated the Lucama to the FA.

http://papayatreenursery.com/ (http://papayatreenursery.com/)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Tomas on March 19, 2013, 11:12:58 PM
Hi JF,

Wow that's good news! I have a small lucuma plant myself and I got worried that I need at least two. I will check with Alex. I wish I were in that neighborhood.

Tomas
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Sabahan on March 19, 2013, 11:41:13 PM
Im getting confuse of canistel,ross sapote and lucuma,what is the main different between these 3 closed relative fruits?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fyliu on March 19, 2013, 11:44:39 PM
I got mine from Alex. I would get it from him even when it cost more than other places. His plants are healthier and often already flowering or fruiting.

Quail Gardens in San Diego also has an always loaded lucuma. It's of the dry variety that's softball-sized. Alex's is the nice creamy kind that's much smaller.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fruitlovers on March 20, 2013, 12:08:23 AM
Im getting confuse of canistel,ross sapote and lucuma,what is the main different between these 3 closed relative fruits?

Canistel: Pouteria campechiana
Lucuma: Pouteria obovata
Ross Sapote: Pouteria sp., it's not known for sure if this is a different species from campechiana, a sub species of campechiana, or totoally different species.

Ross sapote and campechiana fruits are very similar. The Ross sapote tends to be moister pulp than most canistels. The lucuma has a little nipple marking on the end which canistel and ross don't have. Lucumas vary from extremely dry to quite moist. The taste of these 3 fruits is very similar. Lucuma is more cold hardy than the others as some lucumas come from highlands of Andes. Canistel originates in Mexico. Ross Sapote originates in Costa Rica. So i'm thinking Lucuma is the most sub tropical, canistel in between, and Ross sapote the most tropical.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fyliu on March 20, 2013, 12:17:25 AM
The lucuma has a little nipple marking on the end which canistel and ross don't have.
You mean the ring of scar tissue on the flower end of the fruit?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Tomas on March 20, 2013, 12:25:23 AM
Hi fyliu,

About the dry and the creamy kind of lucuma, do they taste the same?

Tomas
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fyliu on March 20, 2013, 12:58:50 AM
I thought the dry one tastes like sweet potato. The smaller rounder ones with more moisture are supposed to be better.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fruitlovers on March 20, 2013, 01:10:02 AM
The lucuma has a little nipple marking on the end which canistel and ross don't have.
You mean the ring of scar tissue on the flower end of the fruit?

Yes.
(http://fruitlovers.com/Gallery1/PouteriaObovata.jpg)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fruitlovers on March 20, 2013, 01:17:17 AM
I thought the dry one tastes like sweet potato. The smaller rounder ones with more moisture are supposed to be better.

The dry lucumas are not for eating out of hand. They are used for processing. They are much drier than the driest of the canistels! Only the moist ones are eaten out of hand. You can buy Lucuma powder at many health food stores. It's used for baking, making deserts, ice cream, adding to smoothies. Hard to describe the taste of the powder but i find it very appealing.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Xeno on March 20, 2013, 01:17:41 AM
Lucumas generally arn't eaten out of hand are they? Isn't the powder used in milkshakes and other stuff like that. So get the dry easy to find kind. That's what I'm about to resort to.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fruitlovers on March 20, 2013, 01:19:43 AM
Lucumas generally arn't eaten out of hand are they? Isn't the powder used in milkshakes and other stuff like that. So get the dry easy to find kind. That's what I'm about to resort to.

The moist lucumas are very pleasant to eat out of hand, but are much harder to find. For some reason almost all the plants in USA are of the dry type.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fyliu on March 20, 2013, 03:35:26 AM
Maybe the dry type is hardier? Alex sells the more moist type but I guess it's because his father went through the trouble of collecting those.

I got a grafted tree with flowers last year and I'm seeing 1 bud right now. Spring's just starting so that's a good sign.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fruitlovers on March 20, 2013, 05:53:37 AM
Maybe the dry type is hardier? Alex sells the more moist type but I guess it's because his father went through the trouble of collecting those.

I got a grafted tree with flowers last year and I'm seeing 1 bud right now. Spring's just starting so that's a good sign.

I  believe that is right, the upland varieties tend to be dry types, moist types are lowland types.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Xeno on March 20, 2013, 11:56:21 PM
I got a grafted tree with flowers last year
How much was it?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fyliu on March 21, 2013, 12:07:58 AM
Xeno I PM'd you but I'm not sure how much it actually was. I decided I just had to have one so I got one and it happened to be one of the hottest days of last year. All his plants were looking tired and the leaves on mine were all drooping by the time I got home but it recovered just fine after a couple weeks in the shade.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Eliganics on August 22, 2013, 05:14:26 AM
Hello guys,

For those who want to try Organic Raw Lucuma Powder, I really advise you to go to my friend's website: Maretai Organics
Here is the link : http://www.maretai.com.au/lucuma-powder.html (http://www.maretai.com.au/lucuma-powder.html)

Their offers really worth it and you can be sure to have a a high quality product!

Don't forget that you can do whatever you want with this powder as it is very versatile! It mixes very well with many dishes and foods such as cakes, ice creams, drinks, shakes, baked goods and many others.

See you!
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Luisport on August 22, 2013, 07:43:19 AM
Fresh Lucuma Fruit! (Low Glycemic) Episode #87 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VV8uT3yea0w#)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: terejiguete on August 22, 2013, 07:33:10 PM
Fresh Lucuma Fruit! (Low Glycemic) Episode #87 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VV8uT3yea0w#)

what appears in the video is not lucuma is Matisia cordata


regards
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Berto on August 22, 2013, 10:01:45 PM
I also noticed that it was not lucuma.  I was waiting for someone to mention it.
They were eating matisia cordata also known as  quararibea cordata. The common name used in Brasil is "Sapota-do-Solimoes (solimoes is the name of a river in the amazon area).
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: ScottR on August 22, 2013, 11:29:01 PM
Fyliu, just wanted to let you know that I got one scion of your Lucuma to take on my tree, I try to get a pic soon. Thanks again! That tree is still holding the first one fruit! :) ;D 8)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Luisport on October 18, 2013, 03:55:20 PM
Great article about lucuma: http://mundani-garden.blogspot.pt/2012/02/lucumo-of-peru-gift-from-andes.html (http://mundani-garden.blogspot.pt/2012/02/lucumo-of-peru-gift-from-andes.html)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Felipe on October 18, 2013, 04:55:14 PM
Luis, are you growing lucuma?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Luisport on October 18, 2013, 05:19:50 PM
Luis, are you growing lucuma?
No, infortunately i don't get any seed yet, but i want it a lot!  ;D You have it don't you? You have a good experience with lucuma?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Luisport on October 19, 2013, 12:39:40 PM
Productos del Perú (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yepR05j-6EY#)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Luisport on October 19, 2013, 01:57:05 PM
BUSCANDO LA LUCUMA!!!! PERUANA (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUyTe-mFPO8#)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: thao on October 19, 2013, 02:22:10 PM
Can lucoma be propagated by cuttings? Look at the first and last picture on the side. It's the same plant picture, just a close up of the flowers or are they flowers? Is that a moist or dry looking fruit variety?

http://www.amazon.com/L%C3%BAcuma-Pouteria-Lucuma-Eggfruit-Plant/dp/B009ZII44M/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1382206115&sr=8-1&keywords=lucuma+plant (http://www.amazon.com/L%C3%BAcuma-Pouteria-Lucuma-Eggfruit-Plant/dp/B009ZII44M/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1382206115&sr=8-1&keywords=lucuma+plant)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Luisport on October 19, 2013, 02:27:04 PM
Can lucoma be propagated by cuttings? Look at the first and last picture on the side. It's the same plant picture, just a close up of the flowers or are they flowers? Is that a moist or dry looking fruit variety?

http://www.amazon.com/L%C3%BAcuma-Pouteria-Lucuma-Eggfruit-Plant/dp/B009ZII44M/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1382206115&sr=8-1&keywords=lucuma+plant (http://www.amazon.com/L%C3%BAcuma-Pouteria-Lucuma-Eggfruit-Plant/dp/B009ZII44M/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1382206115&sr=8-1&keywords=lucuma+plant)
Hi! In the last video they plant the lucuma orchad by planting cuttings on the grownd! There are the dry var. lucuma de palo and the moist var. lucuma de seda.  :)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Felipe on October 19, 2013, 02:36:02 PM
Luis, are you growing lucuma?
No, infortunately i don't get any seed yet, but i want it a lot!  ;D You have it don't you? You have a good experience with lucuma?

Yes, I currently have two grafted trees. I don't know the first cultivar. The second one is La Molina #4. I have not tasted the last one, but I have very good references about the eating quality. BTW, La Molina is the public research station in Lima, Peru.

Both trees are doing fine, but I think they would prefer a little cooler climate. They suffer some stress in summer.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Luisport on October 19, 2013, 02:42:12 PM
Luis, are you growing lucuma?
No, infortunately i don't get any seed yet, but i want it a lot!  ;D You have it don't you? You have a good experience with lucuma?

Yes, I currently have two grafted trees. I don't know the first cultivar. The second one is La Molina #4. I have not tasted the last one, but I have very good references about the eating quality. BTW, La Molina is the public research station in Lima, Peru.

Both trees are doing fine, but I think they would prefer a little cooler climate. They suffer some stress in summer.
Really? This give me hope... i think lucuma will grow very well here...
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: thao on October 19, 2013, 02:53:17 PM
Can lucoma be propagated by cuttings? Look at the first and last picture on the side. It's the same plant picture, just a close up of the flowers or are they flowers? Is that a moist or dry looking fruit variety?

http://www.amazon.com/L%C3%BAcuma-Pouteria-Lucuma-Eggfruit-Plant/dp/B009ZII44M/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1382206115&sr=8-1&keywords=lucuma+plant (http://www.amazon.com/L%C3%BAcuma-Pouteria-Lucuma-Eggfruit-Plant/dp/B009ZII44M/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1382206115&sr=8-1&keywords=lucuma+plant)
Hi! In the last video they plant the lucuma orchad by planting cuttings on the grownd! There are the dry var. lucuma de palo and the moist var. lucuma de seda.  :)
Thanks, I didn't look at that video and commented before watching it.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Luisport on May 30, 2014, 12:13:05 PM
I just find a nursery here that sells Big lucuma trees of var La Molina by 25 euros. I will buy one!  ;D
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Luisport on July 22, 2014, 12:46:47 PM
Luis, are you growing lucuma?
Now i have!!! I just buy a lucuma de seda "Molina 4" tree!!!  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D and a canistel tree too!!!  ;)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Tomas on July 22, 2014, 01:29:25 PM
Lucky you! Do you know the difference between Molina #4 and Molina #1? It would be interesting to know.

Tomas
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Luisport on July 22, 2014, 02:49:57 PM
Lucky you! Do you know the difference between Molina #4 and Molina #1? It would be interesting to know.

Tomas
Hi Tomas! That's a good question but i don't know... By the way, a seed of eugenia lutescens just sprout!  ;D
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Jackfruitwhisperer69 on July 22, 2014, 04:00:25 PM
My big tree is in full bloom at the moment and a young  tree, which i grafted has also a few flowers...hopefully this year, I'll see some fruits. :)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Luisport on July 22, 2014, 04:37:26 PM
My big tree is in full bloom at the moment and a young  tree, which i grafted has also a few flowers...hopefully this year, I'll see some fruits. :)
Hi Jack! Do you know if they fruit with only one tree? Congratulations!  ;D
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Jackfruitwhisperer69 on July 22, 2014, 05:01:26 PM
My big tree is in full bloom at the moment and a young  tree, which i grafted has also a few flowers...hopefully this year, I'll see some fruits. :)
Hi Jack! Do you know if they fruit with only one tree? Congratulations!  ;D

Hey Luis, ;) Thanks...I reckon another tree not needed, as I have seen a single tree heavy with fruit...but, my tree has been flowering for several years now, though not a single fruit has been produced...maybe, a lack of pollination.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Luisport on July 22, 2014, 05:10:39 PM
My big tree is in full bloom at the moment and a young  tree, which i grafted has also a few flowers...hopefully this year, I'll see some fruits. :)
Hi Jack! Do you know if they fruit with only one tree? Congratulations!  ;D

Hey Luis, ;) Thanks...I reckon another tree not needed, as I have seen a single tree heavy with fruit...but, my tree has been flowering for several years now, though not a single fruit has been produced...maybe, a lack of pollination.
I just hope not... i don't have more space!  :-[
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Felipe on July 22, 2014, 05:28:33 PM
Usually lucuma is self fertile, same as all sapotacea I know of.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Jackfruitwhisperer69 on July 22, 2014, 06:13:07 PM
My big tree is in full bloom at the moment and a young  tree, which i grafted has also a few flowers...hopefully this year, I'll see some fruits. :)
Hi Jack! Do you know if they fruit with only one tree? Congratulations!  ;D

Hey Luis, ;) Thanks...I reckon another tree not needed, as I have seen a single tree heavy with fruit...but, my tree has been flowering for several years now, though not a single fruit has been produced...maybe, a lack of pollination.
I just hope not... i don't have more space!  :-[

A grafted lucuma doesn't get very big...quite a manageable tree. There is always space for them trees. :)

Usually lucuma is self fertile, same as all sapotacea I know of.

Hey Felipe, I'm aware of that, but my tree doesn't set any fruit.  :-\ Has your trees started to produce?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Felipe on July 24, 2014, 04:40:12 PM
Steven, my older lucuma grafted lucuma (unknown cultivar) does produce. The younger one (La Molina #4) has flowered not not produces yet.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Jackfruitwhisperer69 on July 24, 2014, 05:08:59 PM
Steven, my older lucuma grafted lucuma (unknown cultivar) does produce. The younger one (La Molina #4) has flowered not not produces yet.

Grazie, Felipe...maybe, the older tree is La Molina Nº1. This cultivar has been around for quite some time.

Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: stuartdaly88 on July 24, 2014, 05:20:51 PM
Is the general consensus that the more dey types posses the more highland genes and consequently have more cold hardiness?

Anyone able to sell trade or point me in the right direction seeds from higher altitude varieties?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Jackfruitwhisperer69 on July 24, 2014, 05:26:37 PM
Is the general consensus that the more dey types posses the more highland genes and consequently have more cold hardiness?

Anyone able to sell trade or point me in the right direction seeds from higher altitude varieties?

Ek kan sade kry in September. ;)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: stuartdaly88 on July 24, 2014, 05:41:32 PM
Is the general consensus that the more dey types posses the more highland genes and consequently have more cold hardiness?

Anyone able to sell trade or point me in the right direction seeds from higher altitude varieties?

Ek kan sade kry in September. ;)

Baie dankie!
red my asseblief 'n paar ;D

I don't mind paying postage and for the seeds :D
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Jackfruitwhisperer69 on July 24, 2014, 06:33:26 PM
Is the general consensus that the more dey types posses the more highland genes and consequently have more cold hardiness?

Anyone able to sell trade or point me in the right direction seeds from higher altitude varieties?

Ek kan sade kry in September. ;)

Baie dankie!
red my asseblief 'n paar ;D

I don't mind paying postage and for the seeds :D

hehe Ek sal vir jou a paar kry. :)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Berto on November 09, 2014, 11:19:45 AM
Interesting!
http://www.cbd.int/abs/side-events/icnp2/twn-icnp2-no4-Lucuma-Peru.pdf (http://www.cbd.int/abs/side-events/icnp2/twn-icnp2-no4-Lucuma-Peru.pdf)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: fruitlovers on November 12, 2014, 03:23:57 AM
Interesting!
http://www.cbd.int/abs/side-events/icnp2/twn-icnp2-no4-Lucuma-Peru.pdf (http://www.cbd.int/abs/side-events/icnp2/twn-icnp2-no4-Lucuma-Peru.pdf)

This type of move by a corporation or university wanting to own rights to a fruit, in this case lucuma, happens very often. And that is why countries have clamped down on what they call biopiracy. Similar thing happened in Brazil, with a Japanese company wanting to trademark cupuacu fruit. Also in Malaysia corporations went in to "study" and then use forest products as patented ingredients in pharmaceuticals. Now both Brazil and Malaysia have some of the strictest rules about removing any plant products from their countries. What these corporations do has a very negative side effects on us gardeners and seed savers.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Berto on November 12, 2014, 10:34:32 AM
My hand luggage was searched three times before I boarded a plane in Manaus (Amazon region).
As Oscar mentioned, we get affected by the "greedy" behavior of the people in charge of these entities. All they want is to make money...money.....money!  I believe that India had to fight to keep "neem", and Brasil also had to fight to keep "açaí".... That's terrible!
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Jackfruitwhisperer69 on November 12, 2014, 03:44:37 PM
Luis, are you growing lucuma?
Now i have!!! I just buy a lucuma de seda "Molina 4" tree!!!  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D and a canistel tree too!!!  ;)

Luis, vai dar certo! Lucuma producing heavy loads of fruit in Oliveira da Azeméis(terra da Fanny, para você ver!  ;D )...so lucuma will grow well by you.  ;)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Luisport on November 12, 2014, 04:26:03 PM
Luis, are you growing lucuma?
Now i have!!! I just buy a lucuma de seda "Molina 4" tree!!!  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D and a canistel tree too!!!  ;)

Luis, vai dar certo! Lucuma producing heavy loads of fruit in Oliveira da Azeméis(terra da Fanny, para você ver!  ;D )...so lucuma will grow well by you.  ;)
Thank God! It's a great tree!  ;D
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: bangkok on November 12, 2014, 10:49:04 PM
Interesting!
http://www.cbd.int/abs/side-events/icnp2/twn-icnp2-no4-Lucuma-Peru.pdf (http://www.cbd.int/abs/side-events/icnp2/twn-icnp2-no4-Lucuma-Peru.pdf)

This type of move by a corporation or university wanting to own rights to a fruit, in this case lucuma, happens very often. And that is why countries have clamped down on what they call biopiracy. Similar thing happened in Brazil, with a Japanese company wanting to trademark cupuacu fruit. Also in Malaysia corporations went in to "study" and then use forest products as patented ingredients in pharmaceuticals. Now both Brazil and Malaysia have some of the strictest rules about removing any plant products from their countries. What these corporations do has a very negative side effects on us gardeners and seed savers.

Those country's have the full right to sell the plants to who-ever they like. They don't care at all for slandering seedsellers from the USA who think they rule the fruitmarket. In fact they also want the world to see their fruits  grown to full size, not the midgets that are produced on Hawaii.

People with connections will get those seeds anyway.

Have a nice day.

Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: gunnar429 on June 27, 2015, 07:34:24 PM
Great , I hope my tree will produce one day , not holding my breath...maybe too hot here...

Hey Luc,

u know there's a few varieties..and one that is supposed to be better for the lowlands....I wonder what type u have??

I want the one that's for the low lands...and it was sacred because of the gold color of the skin.

here is a quote from my post about this earlier on the forum

If you can, locate the sacred lucuma, that grows in the low lands...the incas worship gold, and this lucuma has a gold color...it can be grown at lower elevations, and should be suitable for FL.

I think its called Lucuma de seda.
 here is a link...get me some seeds or scions now!

good luck...i don't think lucuma seeds are good to pass through your system! LOL better get permits.
http://www.ocfruit.com/files/LUCUMA.htm (http://www.ocfruit.com/files/LUCUMA.htm)

Adam, did you ever find the lowland variety?

What are your thoughts on P. multiflora?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: joaave on July 26, 2015, 10:01:09 AM
Pouteria lucuma how nay years into production?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: KarenRei on January 08, 2018, 05:10:33 PM
So, a friend from Peru just told me that I'm not allowed to leave lucuma off my cultivation list.  ;)  I've been finding mixed info online about lucuma cultivation - specifically about humidity.  Does it require high humidity or not?  Or is there a difference between highland/lowland versions and/or moist/dry varieties?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Kada on January 08, 2018, 09:52:30 PM
Pouteria lucuma how nay years into production?


Here in Taiwan probably 3-4 years, its a pretty easy thing to grow here.  My trees are left abandoned at my old farm covered in morning glory so no longer produce as far as i know haha.  but they are kind of a leave it and grow like mango as far as i have seen.  canistel the same.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Recher on December 15, 2018, 01:30:15 AM

 is there a difference between highland/lowland versions and/or moist/dry varieties?
[/quote]  Dry types are for processing. Moist can be eaten as dessert fruit. Grows and produces well in warm wet humid subtropics. Pest free after decades  BUT is intolerant of shade
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: druss on December 15, 2018, 07:39:27 AM
Ive got seedlings of molina, montalban, an unnamed moist type as well as seedlings of dry types, not sure if any are yellow skinned though.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Californiatropicals on January 22, 2020, 11:39:20 PM
Tim kindly gave me a couple of the seeds from the original post, which I planted. Both grew well and just recently I noticed a fruit set on one!
(https://i.postimg.cc/ftYY3H1g/20200122-150549.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/ftYY3H1g)
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: giorgosgr on January 23, 2020, 05:17:11 AM
Tim kindly gave me a couple of the seeds from the original post, which I planted. Both grew well and just recently I noticed a fruit set on one!
(https://i.postimg.cc/ftYY3H1g/20200122-150549.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/ftYY3H1g)

Wow that is amazing! So it fruits only in 5-6 years from seed? its great.

Question;
I have 2 lucuma plants in pots around 5ft tall. I am planing to plant them in the first days of March. Do you have any recommendations regarding the location? Full sun (  max summer temps 104°F maybe only for one week ) or semi shade (in a small forest i have) with full sun only for 6-7 hours each day? Also this winter we had min temp 29°F and night temps near 32°F for 10 days in a row. Could it suceed?
Thanks!
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Bush2Beach on January 25, 2020, 12:32:36 AM
Heya Daniel! Any idea’s on the mini miracle of this fruit set and how it may have been pollinated?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Californiatropicals on January 25, 2020, 04:47:32 AM
Tim kindly gave me a couple of the seeds from the original post, which I planted. Both grew well and just recently I noticed a fruit set on one!
(https://i.postimg.cc/ftYY3H1g/20200122-150549.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/ftYY3H1g)

Wow that is amazing! So it fruits only in 5-6 years from seed? its great.

Question;
I have 2 lucuma plants in pots around 5ft tall. I am planing to plant them in the first days of March. Do you have any recommendations regarding the location? Full sun (  max summer temps 104°F maybe only for one week ) or semi shade (in a small forest i have) with full sun only for 6-7 hours each day? Also this winter we had min temp 29°F and night temps near 32°F for 10 days in a row. Could it suceed?
Thanks!

Hey there! It should do okay in part shade. Mine are partially shaded and they don't seem to kind the cold much! It would definitely be worth planting in ground!
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Californiatropicals on January 25, 2020, 04:52:31 AM
Heya Daniel! Any idea’s on the mini miracle of this fruit set and how it may have been pollinated?

Heyo Jonah!

So this is the only one I've seen so far (but I haven't taken a real thorough look yet)  this is gonna sound weird but I had a "premenision" there was going to be a fruit, I went and looked and saw this!

As far as pollination, I tried  squeezing the flowers as recommended for pouteria  but that didn't work yet. This one was high up on the plant where I couldn't reach so it must have been pollinated some other way!

Also the Lisa atemoya I got from youbis fruiting this year. Can't wait to try it!

Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Recher on February 17, 2020, 01:49:47 PM
Lucuma definitely prefer full sun to fruit
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Hylo on February 18, 2020, 06:48:14 AM
Damn......mine is growing in half shade  :-\
4ft high...do you reckon I should move it?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Fazendeiro on February 23, 2022, 05:02:23 PM
I've been travelling through South America for some time, passing also through Peru, Ecuador and Colombia.
In Peru and Ecuador I've eaten Lucuma several times without knowing anything about the two types ("lowland" and "highland"). I've had good ones and bad ones. The fruit that was most similar in taste to me was the macauba or bocaiuva palm fruit (Acrocomia aculeata) while being totally different in texture.

When arriving at the hot and moist tropical coast of Colombia I got to know the "Zapote costeño", the Mamey Sapote. There I heard that people graft Lucuma scions to Mamey Sapote rootstock to adapt it to the hot and moist climate. Does anyone have experience with that?
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: nattyfroootz on February 23, 2022, 10:09:30 PM
What were the good ones and bad ones like? Are the differences mainly textural or taste?  Thank you!

Sounds interesting that they are grafting onto Mamey but seems like something that would be done in Florida.  I know a lot of people graft Green Sapote (Pouteria viridis) and Ross Sapote (Pouteria sp.) onto Mamey out in Florida.   I am going to try and graft a bunch of different Pouteria spp. onto Lucuma to try and increase cold hardiness and highland temperatures/climate.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: seng on February 23, 2022, 11:40:02 PM
I chuck my two lucuma two years ago.  I got the trees from san diego CRFG.  The fruits were so dry compare to canistel.  The plants are very nice though.

Last year, I also chuck my canistel because it did not fruit for the last decade.  Just flowers.

My green sapote fruits are too sweet and salty.  Yes, salty fruit.  More moist than canistel.  Way too cold sensitive.  All the air layer died on the tree except two.  Now only one air layer is survived with difficulty.   The mother tree is not doing well as well.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: brian on February 24, 2022, 12:03:23 AM
How long does lucuma take to fruit from seed?  I have a couple seedlings I got on a whim, I wonder if they are a decade-long commitment.  I already have a grafted canistel so I wonder if seedling pouteria is worth the wait.  I got a Ross Sapote also that is plenty healthy but might not fruit for a long time.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: seng on February 24, 2022, 12:31:04 AM
lucuma seedling about 7 years.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Fazendeiro on February 24, 2022, 10:46:07 AM
@nattyfroootz: Some were sweeter and had a more aromatic taste, others were more or less tasteless. All of them were on the dry side, like really hard boiled egg yolk - but still with some minor variations. This "dryness" didn't bother me though - I rather thought it to be interesting in comparison with all the other fruit varieties I had in South America.

I learned that you need to let Lucuma wrinkle on the outside before you eat it.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: nattyfroootz on February 24, 2022, 11:27:46 AM
Thanks for the info on your experiences!  That's interesting to hear about the dry firm texture. Do you think that the fruits may have been picked early?  I've definitely noticed some Pouteria spp. need to be picked at proper ripeness and can vary dramatically in texture if not done so. 
I have spoken with another forum member who is living in Peru and he mentioned that in the past couple years Lucuma is abundant in most markets and has become more of an agricultural commodity.  I wonder if many of the trees are grafted or if they are breeding and creating cultivars.

Thanks Fazendeiro!
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Fazendeiro on February 24, 2022, 01:21:40 PM
Maybe the tasteless ones are a poor cultivar or have been picked early. But I find it hard to imagine how an unripe Lucuma would taste like. No lucuma had a "green" taste, if you know what I mean. The texture was a little creamier in some of the Lucumas what didn't appear to be a difference in ripeness.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: brian on February 24, 2022, 01:30:55 PM
lucuma seedling about 7 years.

thank you


When I tried canistel for the first and only time I bought two fruits.  The first was very dry and chalky, the second I let sit a few more days and was one of the tastiest fruits I'd ever eaten.  Not sure if the fruit is variable, but I suspect it really is the ripeness.
Title: Re: Pouteria lucuma
Post by: Fazendeiro on February 24, 2022, 04:10:09 PM
As I wrote earlier the Peruvians taught me that I need to let the Lucuma sit until it has wrinkles. I did that with all Lucuma fruits I bought or bought already wrinkly ones. Even so there were big differences in taste which I think could be the cultivars because I never bought fruit at the same market while travelling.

But I'll keep that in mind and get a chance to buy Lucuma for the next time, I'll try that out.

People earlier in this thread were writing that the highland species was inedible because it was so dry - I really would like to compare it with the lowland one. But from the size description those I had were all softball-sized.