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Messages - venturabananas

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1
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / WTB Sweet Tart mango scions
« on: April 02, 2022, 10:35:30 AM »
I'm looking for about 6 Sweet Tart mango scions that are pencil diameter or a bit thinner.  Please PM me if you have some.

2
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / WTB Sweet Tart mango scions
« on: June 20, 2021, 10:22:28 AM »
Looking to purchase a small quantity (3-5) of scions of Sweet Tart mango.  Please contact me if you have any available. 

Thanks,
Mark

3
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: THAI DWARF MULBERRY PLANTS
« on: March 07, 2021, 10:50:39 AM »
I heard from some members that the World's Best is the same variety as Thai Dwarf but I'm not sure if that's true. My grafted World's Best is a very slow growing graft.

I would guess they are the same.  They sure look like it.

World's Best is definitely not a slow grower.  It's all I can do to keep it in check, at least when grown in the ground.  The neglected ones in pots are a different story.

4
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Avocado thread
« on: August 04, 2020, 04:02:54 PM »
Glyphosate gets roots and all.  No need to complicate this.

Right, but banana shoots in a mat are all connected by a shared corm and rhizomes, so how do you not kill the whole plant in this case where he wants to keep some parts of it?

5
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Avocado thread
« on: August 04, 2020, 01:09:24 PM »
I have enough accumulated injuries that I'm always looking for ways to avoid exacerbating them.  A mattock is a useful tool, but unnecessary for bananas, and is a lower back killer.  Any shovel will slice through banana roots.  And through the rest of the plant if you are cutting downward (not across the fibers), using your body weight.  Hence the lopping off the tops with a saw, then using the shovel.

BTW, you don't need to remove banana roots.  You need to remove the entire offshoot ("pup") including all its bulb-like corm.  The severed roots will die.

For severing woody roots on trees (not bananas), I find a small handsaw that I don't care much about easier on the body than a mattock.

6
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Avocado thread
« on: August 04, 2020, 08:58:24 AM »
Brad, I feel like your attacking my manliness (Lol).  Hey, no one ever called me lazy in the yard; instead, I get in trouble for getting after it too much.  But, yeah, there's something about this banana tree that's intractable for me.  It's rooted into a bunch of river rocks, bounders, brecia, maybe some cement.  I'll give it another go.  I assume digging all the surrounding pups will have some damage on the roots of the one or two I want to maintain.  I'm sure they'll bounce back in time though.  Thanks.

Commercially, glyphosate is sometimes used to kill banana shoots, and it is injected into the shoots to be removed.  Kerosene is used in some places, too.  Personally, I just use elbow grease, especially since the goal is not to kill the entire plant.  The easiest approach I've found is (1) use a wide toothed saw to chop off every shoot you want gone as close to the soil as practical, then (2) use a very sturdy shovel to chop straight down through the remaining stump and corm and pop it out of the ground in pieces until there are no more pieces.  That way you don't actually dig in the soil much, which sounds hard in your situation, you essentially just use your shovel as a cutting blade and crow bar.  You need a really tough shovel for this.  I use one of the Fiskars one with 100% steel construction.

Yes, you will disturb roots of the shoots you want to keep, but you can keep your chopping of roots pretty localized to the shoots you want out.  You'll probably be tired and sore when all is said and done, but it's definitely doable as a one person job.

7
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Avocado thread
« on: August 03, 2020, 11:51:30 PM »
Do you have any tips for how to manage the banana root/base so that it will stop focusing on new growth/shoots/pups and just direct its energy into the one main shoot?

You can't just decapitate the banana shoots, you need to dig them out.  If you leave the corm in the ground, you'll just get more shoots.

8
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Avocado thread
« on: August 03, 2020, 07:59:12 AM »
Anyone know when Jan Boyce avocado is ripe in So Cal?  I've only got one hanging, my first, and I don't want to screw it up and pick it too early.

9
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Banana identification?!
« on: May 05, 2020, 08:49:49 PM »
This does look very similar to the balbisiana

It does, but the shape of the male bud is different as is the way the bracts on it open.

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Banana identification?!
« on: May 05, 2020, 06:50:39 AM »
The unknowns look like Musa balbisiana, which does not produce edible fruit.  I grew it for a while by accident.  Received it as "Blue Java", but it was not.

11
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Banana identification?!
« on: May 05, 2020, 06:46:30 AM »
Haha of course what is called blue java there and here could be different. My blue java fruit at approx 10ft and have a thinner pseudostem that almost always requires propping. They are a pain compared to namwah etc. for this reason. Fruit also looks a very different shape.

Just had a search and apparently they grow elsewhere much taller than they do here so maybe I spoke too soon? Mine are tissue cultured blue java from the largest supplier here, very confident they are blue java.

Hereís my fruit.



Yes, yours is the real Blue Java, and as you say, they do lean like crazy.

12
Congrats.  See, not that hard, but it feels like magic!

13
Does this taste much different from the Psidium cattleianum, also known as strawberry guava? Which one would you say tastes better?

It's completely different.  Not even a tiny bit similar.  It is unlike any other fruit I've had, and very tasty.  I just wish I could get this species to make more fruit!

14
Agreed.  And in SoCal they like afternoon shade.

They seem to do fine without afternoon shade in coastal areas in SoCal (or at least in my coastal area).

15
Annie's Annuals has them too, small plants in 4" pots, but the price is right and they grow fast.

16
My recollection is that there have been properly replicated, controlled studies on this question, and that leaving 4-5' of "trunk" (pseudostem) performed measurably better than removing the shoot that fruited near ground level.

17
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Avocado thread
« on: January 18, 2019, 02:24:46 AM »
Just reporting back on Stewart in Ventura.  The handful of fruits on my tree ripened starting near the end of November and were done about two weeks ago.  Like Brad showed, the skin usually cracked at least a little.  They weren't fully black in color when the cracking started.

They were good, but not great.  Most had a little bit of fiber.  I don't know if that means too ripe or not ripe enough -- or neither.

18
Grafting Stone fruits is very easy. Just look up a video on YouTube. You need to graft when the branches are dormant. I like to graft several weeks to a month before I expect the trees to come out of dormancy.

There are also plenty of great mango grafting videos. If you have any specific questions, just ask here. Good luck!

Simon

Thank you for your suggestions. I tried grafting 5 or so scions early November and all of them failed. I am afraid to try more. I remember Gary Zill was stressing about cambium layer on several of his YouTube videos, I have no clue how does cambium layer look like. I would love to see when someone does grafting in person. Please let me know when you do.

Your timing is definitely off. But i would wait to regraft until there are at least 3 days with day time temp over 75f and night time temps over 55f. Previous years i had 5% success rate with peach tree grafts. Then last year i took the advice of some posters on another forum which indicated that for some stone fruits warmer temps are necessary for the grafts to callous. I received scionwood in january  and waited until warmer weather in march. Surprisingly i had 100% takes in peach cleft grafts. I dont think my knife skills improved all that much in one year so i put it down to waiting for warmer weather and storing scion wood in the refrigerator with ziploc bags with moist towel.

You don't need that kind of warmth.  With decent cleft grafts on peach done in January with healthy scion wood and rootstock, you should get close to 100% success.

19
It appears bud grafting is the easiest one to do. Is the success rate of bud grafting similar to other methods?

I find cleft grafting the easiest and faster to grow out than bud grafts. Thatís what Iíd recommend to someone who hasnít done much grafting.

20
Grafting Stone fruits is very easy. Just look up a video on YouTube. You need to graft when the branches are dormant. I like to graft several weeks to a month before I expect the trees to come out of dormancy.

There are also plenty of great mango grafting videos. If you have any specific questions, just ask here. Good luck!

Simon

Thank you for your suggestions. I tried grafting 5 or so scions early November and all of them failed. I am afraid to try more. I remember Gary Zill was stressing about cambium layer on several of his YouTube videos, I have no clue how does cambium layer look like. I would love to see when someone does grafting in person. Please let me know when you do.

The problem is probably not your technique, but your timing.  You want to graft stone fruit a little bit before they leaf out, not months before they leaf out (unless you are bud grafting in summer).  Simple cleft or whip and tongue grafts are almost foolproof done within a month or so of when the trees break bud.  Even after they start to push new growth, the success rate is really high.  Given where you live in So Cal, I wouldn't think you'd want to graft earlier than late January.  If you know when your tree has typically broken buds, aim for two weeks before that, more or less.

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Topworking vs. single graft on rootstock?
« on: December 27, 2018, 07:20:55 PM »
I agree with everything Brad and Simon said, and would add that "balancing" multiple varieties on a single tree also takes extra work.  By that, I mean having to prune back vigorous varieties harder than slower growing varieties to keep the vigorous ones from taking over a multi-grafted tree.  I was just doing some of that on an avocado.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Sugar Apples wont Ripen
« on: December 24, 2018, 02:25:43 AM »
So Itís 12/20 and all my 11 sugar apples aee green as can be with no signs of ripening. Is it possible they they will eventually ripen or am I doing something wrong? Please see image. This fruit lools beautiful and large but when I sliced it in half, it is very hard. Any suggestions?

Aren't they like cherimoya and avocados in that they need to ripen off the tree?  At least a few days?

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: feijoa pineapple guava
« on: November 21, 2018, 05:55:44 PM »
Well I went and looked at the plants today.  Apparently it did set fruit.  There were a few fruits laying under it.  Never noticed them on the plant.






The fruits really blend in with the foliage.  I'm always surprised by how many come off the trees in my neighborhood despite not seeing a lot of them hanging.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: feijoa pineapple guava
« on: November 21, 2018, 04:56:39 PM »
If you are looking for named varieties (grafted or rooted from cuttings), One Green World and Bay Flora both have some available.  I've bought feijoa from both of them recently and have been happy with what I received.  Smallish, but nice plants.  It seems pretty hard to track down named varieties that don't require knowing a friend of a friend.

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Avocado thread
« on: November 04, 2018, 01:18:23 AM »
Yeah they turn black even inside the tree.  They will fall off when they are fully ripe.  At least wait until its black if you are going to pick them.  Once they start to ripen up, it happens pretty fast so don't worry if you arent getting action yet.

How far from the ocean are you there?

Thanks again.  That's helpful info.  I'm about 3 miles from the ocean and get lots of coastal fog, and then at this time of year, we get some screaming, hot, dry Santa Anas.

Since you are further north and way closer to the ocean its going to take longer for yours to be done.  Probably give in another month or two.  Post back and let us know.  I bet yours end up hanging a lot longer as they will be hitting maturation during the colder months.

I'll report back.  I figured they'd ripen later than yours.  We'll see how much later.  Thanks.

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