Author Topic: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems  (Read 460813 times)

fruitnoob

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2325 on: September 11, 2022, 08:17:20 AM »


Good morning gurus,

My prized Kiew Yai tree has a lot of these, which I thought were freeze damages and have not taken them seriously until I found this forum.
Are these spots from anthracnose? If so, should i: 1, cut off all damaged leaves, and 2. keep spraying copper fungicide every couple of weeks until there's no sign of anthracnose?
The pictures are front and back of the same leaves. There are so many of them :(

Thanks.



« Last Edit: September 11, 2022, 08:26:19 AM by fruitnoob »
Tom

mangoba

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2326 on: September 11, 2022, 09:54:41 AM »
I have been growing mango seedlings with a very large genetic diversity. I have one of the toughest soils, but the general impression has been that the more the Indian/Alphonso spiciness gene gets involved, the more likely the seedling would struggle. Do you notice any major differences when it comes to nutrition requirements of Indian/Alphonso types?

EddieF

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2327 on: September 20, 2022, 07:46:26 PM »
Har, photos of bark splits taken today.  I applied roughly 2 cups Gypsum each tree before all this good rain.
I really don't want to paint them white, does the paint itself help hold moisture in?  I'd use brown if so.
Also wondering if i painted with Gypsum & water, would it soak in & help soften bark?
I have Neem, oil would soften but might be like baby oil to us.  Thoughts?

Leaf tip burn was from me learning that 1oz of micros per gallon was too much.  1/2oz better, lesson learned.

Thank you,
Ed


Peach Cobbler








Maha








« Last Edit: September 20, 2022, 08:00:15 PM by EddieF »

Oolie

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2328 on: September 20, 2022, 08:36:55 PM »
I think the bark split is normal. When I paint, I use Lime, not gypsum, as gypsum stays water soluble, lime sets up in a more permanent coating (holds up to rain). You might have luck with gypsum, but I would expect it to run during application much more easily.

As far as moisture retention, white will only reflect light to lower the likelyhood of burning, the surface area ratio of leaves to roots, as well as dryness of the air will be the factors that affect drying out of the tree.
Also, the bark is dead, and a thicker layer will help protect against burning of the living portion beneath (the cambium).

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2329 on: September 20, 2022, 10:46:17 PM »
Long vertical splits of the corky outer bark is normal maturation.

Short splits with gummosis or running ooze are not normal, and are said to be from "abiotic stresses"--- still rather debated.
Har

JakeFruit

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2330 on: October 07, 2022, 04:39:37 PM »
Noticed these concerning black spots on a Fruit Punch scion I grafted 2 months ago. Iím assuming itís MBBS (Iíd be happy to hear Iím wrong), curious as to what I should do with it now. Itís the only a fruit Punch scion that took.

 
« Last Edit: October 07, 2022, 04:48:56 PM by JakeFruit »

stephenb

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2331 on: October 27, 2022, 06:11:36 PM »
I'm trying to get a diagnosis of what's wrong with the new leaves on my Kent and Juicy Peach. They've both had abundant new growth in the last two weeks, but some of it with these speckles that grow. Anthracnose? Bacterial spot? Insects of some sort? Thanks for any help you can give.






Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2332 on: October 28, 2022, 08:55:24 PM »
Jake Fruit,
Maybe anthracnose, maybe mango bacterial black spot, or other.

Stephenb,
The middle picture looks like Powdery Mildew, maybe,
the others, I have no idea.
Har

Amy K

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2333 on: October 29, 2022, 02:08:13 PM »
Not a disease but I just want confirmation. Is this flower bud?

This is my grafted Maha Chanok. The graft took and look nice but it keep getting taller so I pruned the tips. Hoping it will force to make more side branches. It's been almost a month of nothing happening since. Finally I saw little bud pushing. I'm happy but then I notice this new growth look a bit off. There no way this little stick is making flower? Should I snip it of right the way? It's not strong enough to hold a fruit any way. I'm worry that the graft might snap if I let it hold a fruit.



« Last Edit: October 29, 2022, 02:10:31 PM by Amy K »

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2334 on: October 29, 2022, 08:35:59 PM »
Let it make small fruits, then remove the whole flower pannicle.
Har

Paquicuba

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2335 on: November 22, 2022, 01:38:29 PM »
Hello experts! Any idea what's going on with this tree? Fungus or some sort of nutritional deficiency? Your help is really appreciate it. Thanks!


Ripple

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2336 on: November 23, 2022, 05:16:03 PM »
Is this one of the common mango diseases? It looks like a powdery black mildew (powdery mildew?) but the photos I see online are more of a whitish powdery appearance. This is black moldy looking stuff affecting the deep part of the flower pannicle (and stem part). Thre is also some spider web looking stuff--which is what I saw initially and left it alone. What is it? Should I act?

Thank you for having a look! :D


Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2337 on: November 25, 2022, 05:45:14 PM »
Paquicuba,
Did this show up after Hurricane Ian?  Did you get winds near Category One?

Ripple,
Unable to magnify.  What I can see looks healthy.
Har

EddieF

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2338 on: November 27, 2022, 07:25:48 PM »
Har & Oolie, just want to thank you for replies to my question.  I wrote long reply a month ago but lost it when my failing modem router's wifi cut out.  Had me po'd.  Replaced it since.
The splits on trunk were sticky but not oozing so i let it be.  I think they're ok.

I did see leaves on some after tropical storm winds get mild damage.  Are mango trees subject to wind burn?  Wondered after seeing a previous persons question.

Ed

Paquicuba

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2339 on: November 28, 2022, 10:56:30 AM »
Paquicuba,
Did this show up after Hurricane Ian?  Did you get winds near Category One?

Around the same time, but we didn't get affected by IAN at all.

Thanks!

qcguy4198

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2340 on: December 16, 2022, 07:54:06 AM »
Please help me understand what my Mango tree is telling me. I have a Mango tree in my yard. Not sure how old it is, but the trunk is about 8-9" in diameter. A lot of the leaves are showing yellow on the outer edges.  Thank you for your thoughts.




« Last Edit: December 16, 2022, 07:56:50 AM by qcguy4198 »

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2341 on: December 16, 2022, 11:51:19 AM »
Deficiency of Magnesium.

Soak your feet in some warm water with bitter salt/ Epsom Salt, then  pour it around the tree's drip ring.
Har

Jaboticaba45

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2342 on: December 16, 2022, 12:03:09 PM »


What would cause this cut to not heal?
I fertilize 8-3-9
But realize too much N
What is a good comp for fertilizer?


Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2343 on: December 16, 2022, 02:50:34 PM »
Looks healed!
Har

fliptop

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2344 on: December 16, 2022, 02:56:13 PM »
Saw a bunch of these tiny beetle-looking bugs that the interwebs says are young shield bugs/stink bugs. I let them be, and they dispersed after I interrupted their gathering. Should I have crushed them?



Guanabanus

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2345 on: December 19, 2022, 11:42:17 AM »
Fliptop,
I don't know these insects.

I suggest you post this picture to Facebook Group:  Florida Entomology
Har

fliptop

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2346 on: December 20, 2022, 09:30:33 AM »
Thanks, Har! I don't have Facebook, but am now fairly certain these were baby Stinkbugs. Didn't know if I should have killed them on the spot, but it's too late now, as they're long gone.

Zion506

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2347 on: December 24, 2022, 11:42:22 AM »
What happened to co-existing with nature? Or even organic growing principles.

I see many of these bugs and spots on my mango trees and donít have to poison the trees or murder all of natureís little creatures. The bugs just need a place to be and breed and live. When you smash everything that lands on ďyourĒ trees youre just destroying pollinators. Trees have coexisted with bugs long before you came along. The ego of you guys is crazy sad. Bugs live in nature and the trees are their houses.

And why does everyone immediately turn to pesticides? Donít you know that itís just ending up in your body. Into the soil and into the fruit. Nature usually just shows you the answers in nearby plants. Try companion planting or making teas from the ďweedsĒ.

Growing fruit trees and helping them along needs to be our opportunity to coexist and cocreate. When you use the same principles that messed up everything in the grocery store in the first place, youíve lost the plot.
Humans are frugivores. Until they begin to eat inside of their species range, they will never achieve health and vitality.

fliptop

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2348 on: December 24, 2022, 12:35:15 PM »
Thank you for your post, Zion509! Up till then, I had no idea bugs and trees coexisted?! I apologize for asking a question--my.crazy sad ego thought it was fair game to ask a question on a fruit forum, trying to learn from others (including you🙂).

I wonder, though, assuming someone is immediately turning to pesticides might be your own crazy sad ego getting in the way?

fliptop

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Re: Mango Pests, Diseases, and Nutritional Problems
« Reply #2349 on: January 10, 2023, 10:08:09 AM »
This is a recently purchased Florigon. Leaves were plenty and looked great when purchased mid-December, but a lot have developed issues and dropped.

Tree is in original container. It was brought indoors for five days during the recent cold spell (indoors was low light). Outside, mornings have been full of dew and at times fog. I've watered it, but have not done anything else.

I'm guessing this is either Red Rust or Leaf Blight? What if anything should be done? I get nervous seeing so many leaves drop. If it was warmer, I'd plant it--trees here do much better in the ground.

Thanks!



 

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