Author Topic: Sumo Citrus  (Read 1669 times)

EricSC

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #25 on: December 23, 2021, 02:19:48 PM »
sc4001992,

Is it possible somehow it is mixed with Kiyomi?   Kiyomi fruits can get 200g seedless or, if pollinated,with some seeds.

The fruits on your pics do look similar to the Kiyomi pics on web.

My "sumo" fruits look very similar to yours but I will wait for one or two more months to pick up. 

sc4001992

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #26 on: December 23, 2021, 02:28:04 PM »
Millet, same here, my Ponkan fruit has more of a neck than these sumo fruits and the sumo branches are grafted on the Ponkan tree.



Eric, no I double checked my grafted labels, these are not Kiyomi, I have that grafted on this same tree so it's easy for me to compare the fruits side by side. Also the leaves and growth habit is different. I know these photos are all sumo, each branch I have labeled (9/2019, shiranui). No mistake this time, the last photo I took of the fruit comparision may have been a mistake but not these. If you look at the photos, it was taken on the rooftop where all the grafted fruits are accessible.

The photo showing the Ponkan fruit is the main tree, and on this tree I have the Sumo, Kiyomi, and other varieties grafted on them so I know where each branch is grafted (also with tags).

sc4001992

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #27 on: December 23, 2021, 02:30:23 PM »
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« Last Edit: January 13, 2022, 02:32:30 AM by sc4001992 »

sc4001992

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #28 on: January 03, 2022, 02:41:50 AM »
This may explain why there seems to be different shaped Shiranui/Sumo fruits from the CCPP budwood order and why some have seeds.

They say in the description of Shiranui in the citrusvariety database that "DK, 02/09/2020: there are three accessions of ’Shiranui’ legally present"

https://citrusvariety.ucr.edu/citrus/CRC4249.html

Also if you read further into the notes, it states "TJSW, 12/12/2019:" they found many seeds in the fruits they grow.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dekopon


sc4001992

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #29 on: January 03, 2022, 10:23:06 AM »
Here's some shiranui/sumo fruits I picked this weekend. These are budwood that I grafted from UCR, VI-860, on 2019.









Seanny

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #30 on: January 09, 2022, 06:22:01 PM »
 Last year my Sumo tree had 3 fruits.
Those fruits were seedless.

This year that same tree has 18 fruits.
I ate 1 fruit.
It had way too many seeds.

I may net tree this spring to see if fruits have seeds later.

sc4001992

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #31 on: January 09, 2022, 06:30:35 PM »
I picked more/most of the sumo fruits from my 2019 grafted branches since the fruit seemed to have a little give when you squeeze it. Most of the fruits did not have seeds, but they still do not taste good, not sweet yet. I will wait until mid-Feb to pick the last bunch from my 2017 grafted branches. I noticed that these sumo fruits do not get as sweet as the ones from the asian markets.

If I compare the taste of Ponkan with Sumo, the Ponkan is much sweeter (consistently) even though it has some seeds (3-6 in each fruit).
« Last Edit: January 13, 2022, 02:47:43 AM by sc4001992 »

Yorgos

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #32 on: January 10, 2022, 06:25:42 PM »
Is the sweetness for Sumo a result of cumulative heat units like for grapefruit?
Near NRG Stadium, Houston Texas. USDA zone 9a

brian

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #33 on: January 10, 2022, 09:58:37 PM »
I've eaten almost all of mine already, only a half dozen left on the tree.  They were fairly sour in December, but have been becoming sweeter since Christmas and now are quite good.  My waist-high tree had 30-40 fruits this season, it is quite productive.

I have been hacking back quite a few of my in-ground citrus trees (mostly blood oranges), but this one will stay another year and quite possibly for a very long time. 

sc4001992

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #34 on: January 11, 2022, 03:30:06 AM »
Yorgos, I read that the sumo farmers have another process they follow after the fruits are picked. They wait about another 30days to let the acid go away and then the sweetness comes out. But if you wait until its fully ripe on the tree then it should taste pretty decent. For me it would be optimum at end of Feb.

EricSC

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #35 on: January 11, 2022, 02:03:07 PM »
sc4001992,

The potential downside to have the fruits hanging on tree is that it may supress the spring blooming.  This process may turn the tree into alternative bearing, which is often seen with late ripe citrus trees.  Gold nugget is typical this way.

sc4001992

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #36 on: January 11, 2022, 03:52:56 PM »
Eric,

I rather eat good tasting sumo than to pick it early and it isn't sweet and not worth eating yet.

EricSC

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #37 on: January 11, 2022, 07:54:23 PM »
sc4001992,

I am with you for the taste of citrus fruits.   My gold nugget has about 300 fruits which are just about to turn color.   I remembered it will get sweet in March but really sweet in May or June. 
To reduce the alternative bearing, the fruits will have to be picked in March but the fruits will be bland.

sc4001992

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #38 on: January 12, 2022, 01:18:17 AM »
Seems like people in San Diego have fruits ripen later than here in Orange County. All my citrus completely ripens by March. I have been eating my Gold Nuggets now, also have hundreds on the tree. My Honey murcot and A. murcot fruits are all ripening now and it is sweet.

EricSC

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #39 on: January 12, 2022, 07:41:18 PM »
In SD, due to the ocean - desert (~20 miles) with conflicting temperature and winds,  plus hills, canon, channals, each zipcode or sub-zipcod has micro weather which varies a lot and day to day.

I tasted a Gold Nuggets fruit today.  It is solid like a rock and has a trace of sweet with strong sourness.  Will be patient.

sc4001992

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Re: Sumo Citrus
« Reply #40 on: January 12, 2022, 08:37:09 PM »
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« Last Edit: January 13, 2022, 02:34:43 AM by sc4001992 »

 

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