Author Topic: Grafting avocado  (Read 465 times)

D-Grower

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 768
    • United States, Florida, zone 8
    • View Profile
Grafting avocado
« on: February 01, 2022, 04:56:35 PM »
Have a few questions about grafting avocado. A generous member sent some scions that I attempted grafting a few today. Tried two cleft grafts on side branches of a larger rootstock and left the top growing tip on that plant as a measure to hopefully keep the tree alive in general if the grafts fail. Would cut the top off later if the grafts are successful. Unfortunately not sure I did a great job but we'll see.

On two other smaller rootstocks I tried to side veneer graft near the bottom of the rootstock. Left the growing tips on the trees also as a measure to not loose the rootstock if the grafts fail. Unfortunately not sure I did too good with these grafts either. Can't get better unless you try right?

That was a general overview of what I tried today for informational purposes as a prelude to my questions. I'm certainly much more experienced and therefore more comfortable with the cleft grafting. I'm not that experienced a grafted nonetheless. I feel the side grafting is likely a better option to success or at the least to save the rootstock if a graft fails. My major question is on my remaining rootstocks should I just cleft graft somewhere on the main trunk of the seedling trees cutting off the main growth tips and hoping for the best? Figure in the event of a failed graft it's more likely the rootstock will die off too right? The rootstock are healthy enough but maybe not the healthiest in the world if you see my implications there. If a were to cut off the main growth tip and still graft above a side branch would that be better? Leave something for the rootstock to photosynthesis with or would the side branch steal too much resources from the scion? Obviously the scion would become the main stem tip though so maybe I'm wrong there??? Would cut the side branch off if the scion was successful. Rather not kill all my rootstock in the event of failures. What's y'alls wisdoms on this? I will attempt grafting the rest of the scions this weekend when I'm off work again and give the time to get some replies from a variety of people.

Thanks for your help! DG
Trying to grow it all!

sc4001992

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2219
    • USA, CA, Fullerton
    • View Profile
Re: Grafting avocado
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2022, 03:02:59 PM »
Post a few photos showing where you did the side graft and cleft grafts . It would make it easier to give better feedback to your questions.
It sounds like you did the right thing to leave a few leaves growing above your graft point. I always do the side graft and leave top growing until it takes. If you cleft graft, make sure you graft high enough so there are a few leaves below graft point (if possible). Then for both graft methods, if the scion fail, you can save the roostock . As soon as you see the new graft is failing, immediately cut off the bad graft portion.

« Last Edit: February 02, 2022, 03:08:26 PM by sc4001992 »

D-Grower

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 768
    • United States, Florida, zone 8
    • View Profile
Re: Grafting avocado
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2022, 07:24:56 PM »
Few pics of the grafting







 8)
Trying to grow it all!

Ado

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 55
    • Torrance
    • View Profile
Re: Grafting avocado
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2022, 11:25:41 AM »
I did some grafting on a big trunk. Avocado was about 15-20 feet and a seedling. Waited too long to graft it. Very slow producing. Not traditional grafting but if they fail I'll try again on the growth. Keep trying until it works.





sc4001992

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2219
    • USA, CA, Fullerton
    • View Profile
Re: Grafting avocado
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2022, 12:02:22 PM »
D-Grower, your grafts look good. I would not do a side graft so low on the rootstock next time. Just do it on the green hardened wood anywhere along the main trunk. If your side graft is low on the medium size rootstock (3 ft) and it fails, you will have a wound on that trunk. It should heal but sometimes it will take a while and you can get bugs, fungus in the wound. I usually side graft much higher with any fruit tree seedling (graft point above many leaves below it), then is it takes you can cut off the branch above the graft if you only want that one variety. Or if you want more varieties just do the same again above the grafted point. If it fails, then you can cut off the graft and do another later maybe 1" below the failed point on the trunk.

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk