Author Topic: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"  (Read 4462 times)

The Seeds Hunter

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #50 on: February 16, 2022, 11:19:23 AM »
Just because no one else has them, does not mean a fruit should be worth $1000 after someone got to eat it. Its not that Iím not willing to travel there, itís just that Iím not willing to pay that price for such a big gamble. Itís simple business. Also Iím not blasting him. I responded to comments. I value my time and this forum, and if someone is going to try to sell something here, itís not blasting anyone to say if we think itís too high of a price. Itís just how some of us feel. And this isnít a personal website. If you try to make a sale here you are subject to criticism and comment. Regardless of enthusiasm or ability to afford anything, many of us just donít think itís truly in the spirit of preservation. And itís simple business not to buy. That being said maybe making known how we feel will at least start a conversation

Totally agreed on that mate! as said in previous comments! we wish we can make everybody happy though sometimes its the pressure of time and the pressure to keep up with the cost structure that is behind the pricing! we do think some prices are pretty high! and we do work on making that better over the time ( we can't make a tree procuce in a year or two) we have been in the market for two years so far!! it'S not a backyard seed that we are charging those prices for! and then again! no one is forced or told to buy! Business is simple! offer and demand! if our offer doesn't meet your demand! its really pointless to just hate on us while we have introduced more than 200 species to the us and around the world in just two years! species that has never been cultivated before and we will keep doing our best to serve and keep making this market a richer place!

driftwood

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #51 on: February 16, 2022, 12:48:01 PM »
I work very hard for a living, Iím not sure everyone knows what that means. Searching for seeds is a hobby and a vacation.

You are not the only one here who works, takes on other jobs. To imply others don't work hard seems like a bold (and rude) assumption.


I very much applaud your preservation efforts. I never said anyone is forcing anyone to participate. Itís a public sale forum. No one is asking you to respond to my comments. I understand there is a cost structure. And I understand the challenges. Every single one of us has a cost structure in our own lives. And every single person here makes investments of their own time and money to preserve rare species. My main point is that you cannot try to recoup 100% of your investment every time and say itís in the name of species preservation. We all pay a lot for species preservation. People have to make investments to do this. Difference is some of us work hard to make our money and donít get to travel and eat $1000 fruits. Everyone very much appreciates your efforts for preservation, but if you were willing to spend a little of your own money in the name of preservation and meet us in the middle, or find better ways to make things more affordable, I think more species would actually be preserved. I know it is not easy. I am in no way judging anyone, Iím mostly commenting on how I spend my own money. And Iím sure they were expensive to obtain, but youíre asking 75 euro for 10% of a fruits seeds that you have 3 of. You donít know how they were pollinated, if they come true to type, or if they will even grow well in the US. To some of us thatís not a risk worth taking, and itís not a judgment of you personally more of your business practices. Itís just too much money for many of us growers to actually establish, though the vast majority would love to

Saltwater asked for a discount and says people don't work hard to find seeds, asks poster to spend more of his money to make things agreeable. Does anyone else find this funny?


Justifying charging high prices because you give away 30-40% of the seeds is funny logic to me. Itís as if a vendor says they have to charge $20/lb for a fruit because 40% of the fruit is given away to family or friends. It just doesnít make sense

It should be noted, that many species of fruit and ethnobotanical trees and plants of S. America were preserved, selected, planted, and even bred by natives. I think that is why it is important to recognize this and why Seeds Hunter gives locals materials. Think of it like this if your neighbor had a brand new mango cultivar, and you took scions and sold them, wouldn't you feel obliged to give some profits or materials back to your source?



When buying an expensive plant or seed, businesses treat the purchase as an investment into propagation material. Yes its pricy for a single seed, but you do not need to buy 500 seeds and plant an orchard of it. Many people simply buy one or a few seeds, grow it to fruition and/or propagate it, distribute it later.

Botanical gardens in the modern world have done a great job of acquiring species but have completely dropped the ball when it comes to propagation and distribution.

It's funny, the government used to fund people like David Fairchild to go out into the tropics and find suitable crops to bring back. I like this decentralized approach Seeds Hunter has much better though. We cannot wait for institutions to conserve species as it will be far too late.

I think it could be interesting to get a tissue culture and DNA testing lab going. It might be useful in determining how a species relates to others in the genus or family. The tissue culture lab could be a good way to propagate many copies of a plant species and into peoples hands and get field testing going even quicker on it

Bush2Beach

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #52 on: February 16, 2022, 12:52:53 PM »
It is always very hard to believe that none of these fruits are in cultivation by locals in their endemic zone.
I understand the rate of deforestation and in some cases a very small native zone to search for a fruit locals only remember from childhood. There are some great works being done to spread these species far and wide in the hopes to further increase distribution and understanding.

I donít think itís possible to out local the locals anywhere in the world. When you know the forests or streets for your life , you know it much better than anyone visiting.
How can visitors be the one to find and ďbring into cultivation for the first timeĒ a food source that has been in the neighborhood for hundreds and thousands of years? I donít know how thatís possible.
I think itís maybe being brought to english speaking collectors for the first time.
Something portugese speaking locals may care little about .
One thing is very clear is Brazil does not make it easy for these genetics to leave the country.

Giant Gecko

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #53 on: February 16, 2022, 02:57:35 PM »
8 seeds from The Seeds Hunter with shipping in USA $167.50 with the current conversion rate this includes his guarantee if the seeds get lost he sends another package.

8 seeds directly from Brazil 8x$5= $40 plus $60 phytosanitary plus $40 shipping plus 7% PayPal fee = $149.80 with little guarantee if it gets lost. Andre may replace the seeds but you will have to pay for phyto and shipping. This is much more risky in my opinion. Sure you can buy more seeds direct from Brazil to offset the cost of phyto and shipping but that goes into prices that most would consider to be unaffordable on here.

SaltwaterTx

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #54 on: February 16, 2022, 06:40:15 PM »
I mentioned that some of us work for a living driftwood, was not stereotyping. Im sorry you took offense to that. I was responding to comments comparing seed hunting to other occupations. I do this as a hobby. Iíve spend thousands of dollars trying to participate in preservation, and if someone wants to make it into a business, thatís fine. Iím not here to judge and Iím not here to compete. I just made an observation. I was not asking for discounts, simply stating for annona seeds I thought the price was high, too high for me to care to participate. If someone doesnít like that, fine. Maybe I was out of line. We all feed off of each other here. I respect everyoneís point that thereís no one else offering these, and agree itís hard to put a price on rare offerings. And Seeds Hunter... Iím not hating. I respect the species count for sure, and the fact you are out there finding these selections. We are all here doing mother natureís work. And traveling to find selections is a very high level of dedication. Respect. At the end of the day though, they are all truly mother natureís creations, and I do not believe any man should profit too highly from them. That said I know there are costs associated. I own a business, and I understand. Itís a free market. Good luck selling the seeds.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2022, 08:17:47 PM by SaltwaterTx »

Filozophr

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #55 on: February 16, 2022, 07:38:10 PM »
So we gotta pay for the expeditions? And how do we even know what the seeds will do when they mature? Itís too expensive for most to even try to find out. Itís not budwood weíre talking about here, itís shots in the dark. In my opinion this forum exists as a means for mostly serious growers to buy/sell/trade and share info. I try to look at every post when possible. If itís clogging up the BST board, Iím going to comment if I think the price is outrageous. Also I donít think charging astronomical prices is the way to truly preserve a species. Everyone is welcome to create a website and try to draw traffic to it. If you post on here youíre going to draw comments. Charging 75 euro for 4 seeds of a fruit with tons of seeds is just outrageous and a waste of most peopleís time to read the post. And really limits growing ďgiantĒ salzmanii to only a few wealthy growers. Even if I can afford it, Iím not paying for someone else to go traverse the world and get $1000 worth seeds off one fruit. I work very hard for a living, Iím not sure everyone knows what that means. Searching for seeds is a hobby and a vacation. Also weíre dealing with nature and thereís no type of guarantee on anything. I do not doubt the dedication at all. Itís seeds hunters choice to get it in the hands of people or not. If you truly cared about preserving species though you wouldnít charge so much.

with all my respect mate I think no one asked anyone to pay for anything here! we started from scratch knowing we will be facing a lot of challenges and a lot of new and different situations and we went for it adapting with the situation at any point of the time. we have a cost structure and a social structure that we need to be sustaining on Monthly basis to keep our work going and preserve as much species as we can reach!no one is forced to be a part of it! nature is being destroyed on daily basis and if today it's still possible to find some species in few years with the actual destruction pace part of these species will go extinct from the wild. we have made a lot of prices better and we are working on improving them to make them all available at affordable prices for everyone though it takes time. charging astronomical prices is of course not the way to preserve specie , though this is true in which conditions mate ? there are a lot of details that goes into pricing! it'S always easy to judge! though there are expeditions costs, cleaning and selection process and treatment of seeds for storage. our seeds after the cleaning process goes through different stages of selection and goes through many kinds of tests until they are ready for storage and to offer!
we offer follow up and we haven't let any customer down who told us he didn't get a germination for any specie! we always gladly sent new seeds and offered follow up until specie is established! we guarantee delivery and guarantee quality and that also has its costs. logistic also has a high cost structure and so on.. we are establishing all species and cultivars with the aim of propagation and to make them all affordable and accessible for anyone.. though the process takes time.. and while working on getting there we will keep doing our best to keep our social structure and keep this thing going! 30 to 40 percent of our seeds are always shared with natives and serious growers in Brazil before any of these gets offered ! our friends and partners around the globe know who we truly are, if we really care about preservation , and supports us in what we do! we are happy to share seeds, trade seeds and we have traded with  hundreds of people without any money  included! I believe if people asked for trade or found a better way to interact with people instead of judging them , life would have been way better for both parts!

If someone's seeds don't germinate, and you are able to send seeds for any species just like that, does that not contradict some of your details about pricing?
Feel free to pm me if you have any ANNONACEAE for sale‼️

kh0110

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #56 on: February 16, 2022, 09:26:39 PM »
... I work very hard for a living, Iím not sure everyone knows what that means. ...

This is WAY out line!!! Come back down to Earth!
Thera

driftwood

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #57 on: February 16, 2022, 10:34:15 PM »
I mentioned that some of us work for a living driftwood, was not stereotyping. Im sorry you took offense to that. I was responding to comments comparing seed hunting to other occupations. I do this as a hobby. Iíve spend thousands of dollars trying to participate in preservation, and if someone wants to make it into a business, thatís fine. Iím not here to judge and Iím not here to compete. I just made an observation. I was not asking for discounts, simply stating for annona seeds I thought the price was high, too high for me to care to participate. If someone doesnít like that, fine. Maybe I was out of line. We all feed off of each other here. I respect everyoneís point that thereís no one else offering these, and agree itís hard to put a price on rare offerings. And Seeds Hunter... Iím not hating. I respect the species count for sure, and the fact you are out there finding these selections. We are all here doing mother natureís work. And traveling to find selections is a very high level of dedication. Respect. At the end of the day though, they are all truly mother natureís creations, and I do not believe any man should profit too highly from them. That said I know there are costs associated. I own a business, and I understand. Itís a free market. Good luck selling the seeds.

You asked for an over 50% price reduction and mentioned you would buy at that price, while at the same time mentioning that you don't think seed hunting is actual work.

It's not wrong that you think the price is high, but you could have left the comments out about people working hard for their own money. Just because it is a hobby to you, doesn't mean other people don't work hard.

Glad you figured out cost basis. Try ordering from the other seller at a lower price point, but don't forget about all phyto fees and and shipping and hope your package doesn't get seized

« Last Edit: February 16, 2022, 10:39:58 PM by driftwood »

JCorte

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #58 on: February 16, 2022, 10:54:19 PM »
It is always very hard to believe that none of these fruits are in cultivation by locals in their endemic zone.
I understand the rate of deforestation and in some cases a very small native zone to search for a fruit locals only remember from childhood. There are some great works being done to spread these species far and wide in the hopes to further increase distribution and understanding.

I donít think itís possible to out local the locals anywhere in the world. When you know the forests or streets for your life , you know it much better than anyone visiting.
How can visitors be the one to find and ďbring into cultivation for the first timeĒ a food source that has been in the neighborhood for hundreds and thousands of years? I donít know how thatís possible.
I think itís maybe being brought to english speaking collectors for the first time.
Something portugese speaking locals may care little about .
One thing is very clear is Brazil does not make it easy for these genetics to leave the country.

There is a documentary about Joseph Simcox and his brother, ďBotanical Explorers: The Fruitful Forest.Ē  I canít find a link to the entire movie anymore, but here is the trailer.  It gives insight into how great food sources can remain obscure.  If you have the opportunity to see the entire movie, I thought it was great.
https://youtu.be/BnfGd56Qkqw

Janet

SaltwaterTx

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #59 on: February 16, 2022, 11:04:04 PM »
Driftwood- traveling the world and finding fruit might be a business. I work with my hands for a living. Thereís no comparison. Iím not degrading anyone. Doesnít change my feelings that trying to recoup $2800 off 3 fruits is a lot of money. Maybe it costs $2800 to travel to find the 3 fruits. Maybe thatís a fair price to pay for the amount of seeds offered, and itís justified by how rare they are. And maybe it was very difficult. But thereís no way it took the time or effort it takes me, and many other people to make $2800. Also, I was commenting directly to a prior response. I agree the work is important. And yes rare seeds in general are expensive. Itís a choice to set these prices though and I still think itís expecting alot for people to cover that much of the expeditions. That being said, I realize that itís a lot to guarantee anything, and thereís a cost to that, so respect. Also, I wished him luck with the sales. And I genuinely mean it
« Last Edit: February 16, 2022, 11:10:58 PM by SaltwaterTx »

Giant Gecko

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #60 on: February 17, 2022, 08:23:20 AM »
It is always very hard to believe that none of these fruits are in cultivation by locals in their endemic zone.
I understand the rate of deforestation and in some cases a very small native zone to search for a fruit locals only remember from childhood. There are some great works being done to spread these species far and wide in the hopes to further increase distribution and understanding.

I donít think itís possible to out local the locals anywhere in the world. When you know the forests or streets for your life , you know it much better than anyone visiting.
How can visitors be the one to find and ďbring into cultivation for the first timeĒ a food source that has been in the neighborhood for hundreds and thousands of years? I donít know how thatís possible.
I think itís maybe being brought to english speaking collectors for the first time.
Something portugese speaking locals may care little about .
One thing is very clear is Brazil does not make it easy for these genetics to leave the country.

I can tell by Facebook pages like Belas Frutas and others that cultivating native fruit is getting very popular in Brazil. There is just so many species. Most of them donít want to deal with the hassle of shipping internationally or they want to spread the very rare species in cultivation in Brazil first.

Filozophr

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #61 on: February 17, 2022, 08:48:02 AM »
Driftwood- traveling the world and finding fruit might be a business. I work with my hands for a living. Thereís no comparison. Iím not degrading anyone. Doesnít change my feelings that trying to recoup $2800 off 3 fruits is a lot of money. Maybe it costs $2800 to travel to find the 3 fruits. Maybe thatís a fair price to pay for the amount of seeds offered, and itís justified by how rare they are. And maybe it was very difficult. But thereís no way it took the time or effort it takes me, and many other people to make $2800. Also, I was commenting directly to a prior response. I agree the work is important. And yes rare seeds in general are expensive. Itís a choice to set these prices though and I still think itís expecting alot for people to cover that much of the expeditions. That being said, I realize that itís a lot to guarantee anything, and thereís a cost to that, so respect. Also, I wished him luck with the sales. And I genuinely mean it

I think im just gonna wait until someone can sell me a scion lol
Feel free to pm me if you have any ANNONACEAE for sale‼️

ben mango

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #62 on: February 17, 2022, 09:37:31 AM »
It is always very hard to believe that none of these fruits are in cultivation by locals in their endemic zone.
I understand the rate of deforestation and in some cases a very small native zone to search for a fruit locals only remember from childhood. There are some great works being done to spread these species far and wide in the hopes to further increase distribution and understanding.

I donít think itís possible to out local the locals anywhere in the world. When you know the forests or streets for your life , you know it much better than anyone visiting.
How can visitors be the one to find and ďbring into cultivation for the first timeĒ a food source that has been in the neighborhood for hundreds and thousands of years? I donít know how thatís possible.
I think itís maybe being brought to english speaking collectors for the first time.
Something portugese speaking locals may care little about .
One thing is very clear is Brazil does not make it easy for these genetics to leave the country.

There is a documentary about Joseph Simcox and his brother, ďBotanical Explorers: The Fruitful Forest.Ē  I canít find a link to the entire movie anymore, but here is the trailer.  It gives insight into how great food sources can remain obscure.  If you have the opportunity to see the entire movie, I thought it was great.
https://youtu.be/BnfGd56Qkqw

Janet

I watched the film and Iím familiar with Joeís work. Itís true to an extent but if these were really substantial food sources the locals would be cultivating them. We arenít talking ďgreatĒ fruits like jackfruit, durian, and coconut , all of which can be food stables. These fruits or tubers they find are really usually low calorie and not that substantial of a food source.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2022, 09:40:35 AM by ben mango »

JCorte

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #63 on: February 17, 2022, 10:13:42 AM »
Benmango,

Agree, that these are not meant to be about foods for survival.  But, inspiring because of the search for rare fruits and diversity that should be preserved.  Joseph Simcox has dedicated himself to finding, preserving, and sharing rare plant genetics.  This documentary was great in revealing what it takes to search out rare fruits, and the possibilities of what may be out there waiting to be discovered and shared.  Lucís garcinia is an example of a fruit from the wild being brought into cultivation because a couple of guys saw the potential, collected and shared seeds.

Janet

SouthBayHapaJoe

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #64 on: February 17, 2022, 10:44:34 AM »
Janet,
Well said and I tried to find the full movie but alas I donít think itís not on the internet. However the trailer was very interesting! The majority of our fruit diets are more so limited by the nature of the fruit. Up until very recent in human history there was no way to ship fruit with short shelf life so the majority of supermarket fruit and foods were those that could last on a store shelf. There are still so many ďsuperfoodsĒ out there that still have yet to even be discovered. It will take inventive small farmers to take the risk and show big producers what is possible. Because of the many taste reports that say A
Salzmannii is one of the best tasting AnnonasÖ the race is on. Just like yang mei which is everywhere in China and Lucuma in Peru and so many others.

palologrower

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #65 on: February 19, 2022, 05:05:33 AM »
just some thoughts. 

maybe its dutch tulip bulbs all over again, who knows.  but at least you can eat the fruit instead of tulip bulb. 

i think the pandemic has driven up prices in general since there is a lack of mobility to travel.  i know some of the people on this thread (nattyfrootz, i'm looking at you), if given the chance would travel to far places to collect rare jaboticabas, eugenias, annonas whatever.  but we can't (but maybe not for much longer (i hope), and then the flow of migration and seed sources/market will evolve.  Who's lookign into Colombia, Peru, French Guiana, etc?  always somethign new to find. 

Lastly, I had a conversation with a Brazilian fruit collector a while back.  He was AWOL for a while.  After a few months, he responded that he was unwell due to contracting chikungunya disease.  Bones were on fire.  WTF.   So as an armchair seed/tree collector, Sellami's prices are justified.  Can I afford all of them?  No, but I appreciate the effort that you can simply at the click of a button order rare stuff.  I don't want to be that one American that went fruit hunting to only get a candiru up my peepee hole while taking a link and there's no doctor to extract it for miles.  I'll just drink jabo capirinhas off of Copacabana. 

Though....I want to do a jabo collecting trip in General Santos.

The Seeds Hunter

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #66 on: February 24, 2022, 11:03:33 AM »
It is always very hard to believe that none of these fruits are in cultivation by locals in their endemic zone.
I understand the rate of deforestation and in some cases a very small native zone to search for a fruit locals only remember from childhood. There are some great works being done to spread these species far and wide in the hopes to further increase distribution and understanding.

I donít think itís possible to out local the locals anywhere in the world. When you know the forests or streets for your life , you know it much better than anyone visiting.
How can visitors be the one to find and ďbring into cultivation for the first timeĒ a food source that has been in the neighborhood for hundreds and thousands of years? I donít know how thatís possible.
I think itís maybe being brought to english speaking collectors for the first time.
Something portugese speaking locals may care little about .
One thing is very clear is Brazil does not make it easy for these genetics to leave the country.



what about all the new species that even botanists aren't able to identify ? have you been fruit hunting ? did you talk to natives ? have you seen natives impressed of seeing a fruit collected in their region while they know nothing about it ? have you seen nurseries in Brazil selling Bananas, avocados , mangoes , orange trees as native fruiting plants ? most of people in Bahia know Annona squamosa! while very small number of people are aware of fruits like Annona salzmannii , not talking about other more rare fruits !! it's easy to talk about how things should be in theory ! I wish people can go through the practical part before they make their assumptions/ conclusions

The Seeds Hunter

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #67 on: February 24, 2022, 11:13:08 AM »
I mentioned that some of us work for a living driftwood, was not stereotyping. Im sorry you took offense to that. I was responding to comments comparing seed hunting to other occupations. I do this as a hobby. Iíve spend thousands of dollars trying to participate in preservation, and if someone wants to make it into a business, thatís fine. Iím not here to judge and Iím not here to compete. I just made an observation. I was not asking for discounts, simply stating for annona seeds I thought the price was high, too high for me to care to participate. If someone doesnít like that, fine. Maybe I was out of line. We all feed off of each other here. I respect everyoneís point that thereís no one else offering these, and agree itís hard to put a price on rare offerings. And Seeds Hunter... Iím not hating. I respect the species count for sure, and the fact you are out there finding these selections. We are all here doing mother natureís work. And traveling to find selections is a very high level of dedication. Respect. At the end of the day though, they are all truly mother natureís creations, and I do not believe any man should profit too highly from them. That said I know there are costs associated. I own a business, and I understand. Itís a free market. Good luck selling the seeds.

every work in the world, if seen as a hobby, sounds easy ! you may think a musician doesn't work hard because you play some music in the weekend as a hobby! while the musician working with music for a living is probably working pretty hard! I think its rude to compare any job with fruit hunting ( as a job ) just to tell that a fruit hunter isn't working hard or e isn't worth the money he is earning!

who is doing more than you will never judge you! who is doing less than you will gladly judge you ;)

The Seeds Hunter

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #68 on: February 24, 2022, 11:17:45 AM »
So we gotta pay for the expeditions? And how do we even know what the seeds will do when they mature? Itís too expensive for most to even try to find out. Itís not budwood weíre talking about here, itís shots in the dark. In my opinion this forum exists as a means for mostly serious growers to buy/sell/trade and share info. I try to look at every post when possible. If itís clogging up the BST board, Iím going to comment if I think the price is outrageous. Also I donít think charging astronomical prices is the way to truly preserve a species. Everyone is welcome to create a website and try to draw traffic to it. If you post on here youíre going to draw comments. Charging 75 euro for 4 seeds of a fruit with tons of seeds is just outrageous and a waste of most peopleís time to read the post. And really limits growing ďgiantĒ salzmanii to only a few wealthy growers. Even if I can afford it, Iím not paying for someone else to go traverse the world and get $1000 worth seeds off one fruit. I work very hard for a living, Iím not sure everyone knows what that means. Searching for seeds is a hobby and a vacation. Also weíre dealing with nature and thereís no type of guarantee on anything. I do not doubt the dedication at all. Itís seeds hunters choice to get it in the hands of people or not. If you truly cared about preserving species though you wouldnít charge so much.

with all my respect mate I think no one asked anyone to pay for anything here! we started from scratch knowing we will be facing a lot of challenges and a lot of new and different situations and we went for it adapting with the situation at any point of the time. we have a cost structure and a social structure that we need to be sustaining on Monthly basis to keep our work going and preserve as much species as we can reach!no one is forced to be a part of it! nature is being destroyed on daily basis and if today it's still possible to find some species in few years with the actual destruction pace part of these species will go extinct from the wild. we have made a lot of prices better and we are working on improving them to make them all available at affordable prices for everyone though it takes time. charging astronomical prices is of course not the way to preserve specie , though this is true in which conditions mate ? there are a lot of details that goes into pricing! it'S always easy to judge! though there are expeditions costs, cleaning and selection process and treatment of seeds for storage. our seeds after the cleaning process goes through different stages of selection and goes through many kinds of tests until they are ready for storage and to offer!
we offer follow up and we haven't let any customer down who told us he didn't get a germination for any specie! we always gladly sent new seeds and offered follow up until specie is established! we guarantee delivery and guarantee quality and that also has its costs. logistic also has a high cost structure and so on.. we are establishing all species and cultivars with the aim of propagation and to make them all affordable and accessible for anyone.. though the process takes time.. and while working on getting there we will keep doing our best to keep our social structure and keep this thing going! 30 to 40 percent of our seeds are always shared with natives and serious growers in Brazil before any of these gets offered ! our friends and partners around the globe know who we truly are, if we really care about preservation , and supports us in what we do! we are happy to share seeds, trade seeds and we have traded with  hundreds of people without any money  included! I believe if people asked for trade or found a better way to interact with people instead of judging them , life would have been way better for both parts!

If someone's seeds don't germinate, and you are able to send seeds for any species just like that, does that not contradict some of your details about pricing?

good question! we store part of the seeds to study how to best store seeds and guarantee quality of these seeds, most of the seeds we resend are from the seeds we store to study and it happened that we don't have seeds to spare some to study storage and because of the scarcity of some of these, we have offered store credit for customers as well as some choosed to switch to Other species!

I believe people have almost no idea, about the cost structure to gurantee every part of the process until seeds are delivered to customers!

The Seeds Hunter

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #69 on: February 24, 2022, 11:25:07 AM »
Seeds are in the US and Orders will be shipped this coming week, probably on Monday 28th of February.

we are very thankful to all the support and we deeply appreciate it!

nattyfroootz

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #70 on: February 24, 2022, 11:40:40 AM »
Hey Sellami,

Thanks for taking the time to research and study these species. Will you be releasing any data about seed storage conditions success/failures? I am curious if you also take accession data on the location of these species?  I think it would benefit all of us if the locations of species could be disclosed. GPS locations and accession information is an imperative part of conservation that is widely used in Botanical Gardens across the world.

Thanks again
Grow cooler fruits

www.wildlandsplants.com

driftwood

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #71 on: February 24, 2022, 12:45:27 PM »
Hey Sellami,

Thanks for taking the time to research and study these species. Will you be releasing any data about seed storage conditions success/failures? I am curious if you also take accession data on the location of these species?  I think it would benefit all of us if the locations of species could be disclosed. GPS locations and accession information is an imperative part of conservation that is widely used in Botanical Gardens across the world.

Thanks again

Doubt it honestly. The Trichocereus community had a big issue in South America in recent history where people were geotagging plants in their habitat. Unfortunately this kind of thing attracts poachers big time. Some of the cacti got hacked to oblivion. I could see tagging the state or a major landmark or town nearby but I personally donít think exact locations are a good idea to just put out there. Especially when they see the amounts these go for

nattyfroootz

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #72 on: February 24, 2022, 01:02:06 PM »
Hey Sellami,

Thanks for taking the time to research and study these species. Will you be releasing any data about seed storage conditions success/failures? I am curious if you also take accession data on the location of these species?  I think it would benefit all of us if the locations of species could be disclosed. GPS locations and accession information is an imperative part of conservation that is widely used in Botanical Gardens across the world.

Thanks again

Doubt it honestly. The Trichocereus community had a big issue in South America in recent history where people were geotagging plants in their habitat. Unfortunately this kind of thing attracts poachers big time. Some of the cacti got hacked to oblivion. I could see tagging the state or a major landmark or town nearby but I personally don’t think exact locations are a good idea to just put out there. Especially when they see the amounts these go for

Yeah I could totally see that and it's probably best not to give exact locations. I guess it would be good to know that the information is at least being collected somewhere.  It's something that I'd definitely like to work towards collecting the information on as I am not sure the conservation value of species that aren't associated with any localities.  Most of if not all of my rare fruit collection is the result of plants that I'll never know where they truly came from.  I think it would be cool and valuable for someone to take on the task of recording and storing this information.
Grow cooler fruits

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Bush2Beach

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #73 on: February 24, 2022, 01:30:06 PM »
Botanists are far from the end all be all of plant existence and identification. Botanists outdated information has been corrected plenty of times by the rare fruit community.

Worldwide people eat crap processed foods and donít know the endemic edible fruits and plants in their back yard. This is a worldwide confusion of the masses.
So yes of course 90% + of humans only know what is under there noses and would only be interested in buying supermarket fruits to plant.

What I am saying is that there is a small percentage worldwide of humans that are interested in their native flora and fauna and they know about, are growing , or ďdiscoveredĒ the rare fruit that whomever outsider , non native fruit hunter claims to have ď discoveredĒ and chosen to name.

Of course 95% of the population is amazed that fruit is right down the way in the forest, they are entrenched in a non natural empirical babylon shytstem that looks at that same resource as charcoal or grazing land.

While I think it is fantastic to bring these genetics to the people , one of the most important missions on the planet! Thank you Sellami.
I do not believe in most cases you or any other fruit hunter flying in from afar , is putting eyes on and ďdiscoveringĒ a fruit that has been long lost to humans.
Locals will always have the advantage of knowing the area much better than you and your relying on them , so I do find it practically impossible to feel like you need to take credit for discovering the species. Isnít getting the species out there and making the money enough? Why the need to self aggrandize and lay claim to a species discovery? Is this my assumption and misinterpretation?

99% plus of people in California have no idea you can eat the native thimbleberryís, native cherry, manzanita berryís, huckleberries, pine pollen, seaweed or the lemons and limes growing in their front yards for that matter. People are fucking disconnected worldwide and are trained that food comes from the grocery store.
It is always very hard to believe that none of these fruits are in cultivation by locals in their endemic zone.
I understand the rate of deforestation and in some cases a very small native zone to search for a fruit locals only remember from childhood. There are some great works being done to spread these species far and wide in the hopes to further increase distribution and understanding.

I donít think itís possible to out local the locals anywhere in the world. When you know the forests or streets for your life , you know it much better than anyone visiting.
How can visitors be the one to find and ďbring into cultivation for the first timeĒ a food source that has been in the neighborhood for hundreds and thousands of years? I donít know how thatís possible.
I think itís maybe being brought to english speaking collectors for the first time.
Something portugese speaking locals may care little about .
One thing is very clear is Brazil does not make it easy for these genetics to leave the country.



what about all the new species that even botanists aren't able to identify ? have you been fruit hunting ? did you talk to natives ? have you seen natives impressed of seeing a fruit collected in their region while they know nothing about it ? have you seen nurseries in Brazil selling Bananas, avocados , mangoes , orange trees as native fruiting plants ? most of people in Bahia know Annona squamosa! while very small number of people are aware of fruits like Annona salzmannii , not talking about other more rare fruits !! it's easy to talk about how things should be in theory ! I wish people can go through the practical part before they make their assumptions/ conclusions

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Re: Annona salzmannii var "Giant"
« Reply #74 on: February 24, 2022, 02:01:18 PM »
Hey Sellami,

Thanks for taking the time to research and study these species. Will you be releasing any data about seed storage conditions success/failures? I am curious if you also take accession data on the location of these species?  I think it would benefit all of us if the locations of species could be disclosed. GPS locations and accession information is an imperative part of conservation that is widely used in Botanical Gardens across the world.

Thanks again

Doubt it honestly. The Trichocereus community had a big issue in South America in recent history where people were geotagging plants in their habitat. Unfortunately this kind of thing attracts poachers big time. Some of the cacti got hacked to oblivion. I could see tagging the state or a major landmark or town nearby but I personally donít think exact locations are a good idea to just put out there. Especially when they see the amounts these go for

Yeah I could totally see that and it's probably best not to give exact locations. I guess it would be good to know that the information is at least being collected somewhere.  It's something that I'd definitely like to work towards collecting the information on as I am not sure the conservation value of species that aren't associated with any localities.  Most of if not all of my rare fruit collection is the result of plants that I'll never know where they truly came from.  I think it would be cool and valuable for someone to take on the task of recording and storing this information.

Definitely agree, I keep track of all my wild/public fruit trees and mushroom spots in the US via gps. theres a decent platform called www.fallingfruit.org that does crowd sourced gps data of public fruit trees

 

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