Author Topic: Rare Fruit rant?! Disgruntled highschooler growing rare fruits in TN?  (Read 1924 times)

Jaboticaba45

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Ok so this is kind of like a rant. I hate living up north and I hate trying to grow plants that won't grow in ground unless they are 600 miles south of here. It's so unfair that you people in tropical climates can grow whatever you want (for the most part) without having to deal with heating. For the most part, all my plants did fine. That is until I got a decently sized greenhouse and started to put plants in ground. There were a whole plethora of problems instead of a plethora of plinias (if you know, you know ;D ) the plants in ground started to get droopy as there was no wind. so I installed a roll up side...still need to do the other one. need more airflow. So the plants that were droopy had to be hard pruned back. And not I realized that the rollinia has root rot...that mother refrigerator. I realized that annonas are a futile attempt up north unless grafted to the legendary mountain soursop or the alligator apple...Legend has it that it is the best tasting annona in the world ;D .
And also, my guava...it is growing like a beast, but when I gently move the trunk, it moves a lot (the rootball). Way too much? Any ideas on what is happening? our soil is heavy clay>>>Is that causing a problem? Is it root rot? The tree is growing so fast I wouldn't think anything is wrong with it? Am I over worrying? A cardinal decided to make its nest in the guava tree, so now I am extra careful around it and try not to disturb it...couldn't you be respectful of my personal property ;) . To you people in FL, this is the equivalent of a random person showing up at your house and living there without your consent and eating all your mangoes. Just kidding...I'm glad to see life other than plants in my greenhouse. Just not those donkey hole squirrels and raccoons.


I'd move down south, but because of where I am in life it's gonna be some time before I can do anything myself. High school is cool, but I want to keep on moving on. I just want to grow up and grow trees ::)  I just finished finals yesterday so I am able to put more time on trees now. A in microbiology-yay!


Anyways, everything else is doing great. Just counting down for the trees to start flowering and fruiting. I think I'll be double my age before some of the stuff I have fruits...if they even decide to. Yes I'm talking to the plinias and garcinias. They grow so slow. Even if they do lots of new growth, it's barely anything. My oldest jabo is going on 8 years from purchase and I'm tired of waiting, but patience is good for us all right? I've been in this hobby for the last decade or so and have been interested in nature ever since I was alive. Sometimes I think its better to get a new hobby? But I can't leave the plinias as I am the plinia simp!


The first genus of trees I loved was first artocarpus, but then I realized there is something better than growing stuff that will die and never fruit. We hit a record of around 10 different types LOL. Now, I have since downgraded to the plinia simp life. I try to collect as many types as I can with the gold in my coffers. Unfortunately, all that glitters isn't gold and I found out that the gold I have is actually fools gold! So now I am dirt poor with a whole bunch o plinias. Unfortunately I am sick with the plinia disease and there is no cure for it. The only way to appease my pains is do annually migrate to FL to get some more. All jokes aside, they (the plinias) do great in greenhouses and are pretty cool to look at. The fruit isn't too bad either, but to be honest, the grimal jaboticaba tastes exactly like a muscadine...Muscadines are bigger, have smaller seeds, and grow up here for free. BUT, it's name is Vitis rotundifolia, not Plinia sp. peluda de alagoas. :P  Yes, they all have different flavor profiles for the most part as I haven't eaten many.


There are many, many people who have influenced me in growing fruit trees. Whether it be giving me new ideas or techniques or trees or fruit, you people are the best. I've been down to the wonderful land of FL many a time and always am glad to meet new faces. It's awesome that just a hobby can bring people together despite having different beliefs. I've been needing to do another trip to FL now as it's almost been a year since my last escapade. Trying to hit peak mango season. Last summer, after a week of mango gluttony, I was done, done, and done with mangoes. Now, I am back with a vengeance. If you are in a 400 mile radius of me, I would hire a professional guard unit to watch your mango trees. He he he ha.


I know this post is really long. I also know that this is probably not written in standard english. I also know that this is just informal writing.
I don't know what I want you (the reader) to get from this post. Just realize that tropical fruits are cool and get out and keep growing. If I'm still growing rare fruits, so should you. You, (the reader) most likely live in a tropical climate. You, (the reader) can grow tropical fruit trees.
So go out and grow rare fruits.
-Ryan




canito 17

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Hey. Do not get mad ! You have friends in the forum

simon_grow

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Hey Ryan,

With every obstacle you overcome, you become that much more knowledgeable in growing tropical/subtropical fruit trees. Iíve killed many fruit trees and faced many of the same issues you listed and if you love growing fruit trees, you will find a way to jump any hurdles that pop up.

Try growing the red hybrid Jaboticaba, that one will fruit much sooner than the others and it tastes great.

Simon

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When I was in high school I was obsessed with trying to grow orchids on trees here in SoCal.  I failed so much but succeeded just enough to keep trying.  Several years later, after I had already figured out the trick, I read in an orchid society magazine that a guy just a half hour from where I had lived in high school had some trees covered in orchids. 

Here you are in high school obsessed with your own planty challenge but you've got this forum, youtube, instagram and countless other sites with so much useful information. 

Basically I had to walk to school 10 miles uphill both ways through 10 feet of snow...  :o

JF Paso

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And here I am, desperately wanting to try a paw paw after reading all the descriptions (too warm to grow here) lol  Always some holy grail out there to entice us 😁

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When I was in high school I was obsessed with trying to grow orchids on trees here in SoCal.  I failed so much but succeeded just enough to keep trying.  Several years later, after I had already figured out the trick, I read in an orchid society magazine that a guy just a half hour from where I had lived in high school had some trees covered in orchids. 

Here you are in high school obsessed with your own planty challenge but you've got this forum, youtube, instagram and countless other sites with so much useful information. 

Basically I had to walk to school 10 miles uphill both ways through 10 feet of snow...  :o

In Highschool I was reading about plants , and growing
So about Youtube better to just put it in transcript ,
 I' am not going to watch a hour video when I could of read it in 10 or 15.
(transcript option  is the 3 little dots , some video's do not have it )

Saying that
sometimes some things are best to see someone do it ..

(We all are Human I even almost made a big mistake seeing a idea for storing tree's in homemade pots
I read a nursery trade it was a long long read,
and ended up healing over in mound of soil the 1 hundred  4 foot pawpaw tree's
-- this is one example how youtube can be bad) ----- (edit the healing over my way was write you tube wrong)
but to be honest I already had a pit dug it was deep
 (Instead of mound my tree's drowned in the pit , and some other reasons A excited Guatemala taxi driver )
« Last Edit: May 04, 2022, 09:54:35 AM by Francis_Eric »

Francis_Eric

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At least I hope that taxi Driver enjoyed his fruit ,
 and the tree's I tore out of pit in September  did good for him. (it was also more than a $120 fare)

And here I am, desperately wanting to try a paw paw after reading all the descriptions (too warm to grow here) lol  Always some holy grail out there to entice us 😁

You posted at same time

(9A zone in florida people in Gainsville grew pawpaw
there is a Nursery
In CA pawpaw grows in hotter zones I hear , but for some reason not FL.

Could it be the soil even the late Jerry Lehman which breed them added Sulfur in midwest
In Florida I would add Sulfur (it's cheap) maybe raised mounds in mulch

How High is the PH probably very alkaline

Polypterus

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I'm in a fairly similar boat as you are. Just a little further south in 8a, and a year or two ahead of you.

I started collecting and growing these plants during my senior year of high school, and it all started with just some peppers, tomatoes, and a blueberry bush. After I discovered I could buy mango and guava seedlings off ebay, into the rabbit hole I went. I bought a lot of 3 gallon trees that year, almost entirely cherimoya, atemoya, and sugar apple. Three flowered, two set fruit, but for a number of reasons, they dropped them after a few months. Now that I better know what I'm doing, hopefully this will be the year.

There were a number of times where I considered cutting my losses where I'm at now and giving up. I bought $40 worth of african annona seeds, none of them germinated, and to add insult to injury, the cats used the pots as litter boxes. The other thing I constantly wonder is, when is it enough? Between audio, custom keyboards, computers, and aquariums, when should I stop funneling money into this and focus more on those hobbies? Am I even going to be able to care for the plants I have now come 3-5 years, much less the ones I plan to buy? I'm sure everyone has had set backs in this hobby, doubts enter their mind, moments where they asked themselves "is it worth it?", but I find it's best to focus on the good.

My doctor white cherimoya is a solid 4-5 ft with a 1 inch trunk, I'll be damned if it doesn't flower and set fruit this year. I know it's ready. My booth, AP, and sugar apple are all right behind it too, so worst case scenario, it'll be next year. That comes quicker than you'd think. In place of those african annonas, I now have A. vepretorum and A. monticola seeds that just recently sprouted and are growing like weeds; I'd be astonished if I managed to kill them with the level of vigor they're showing. My mangos are also finally putting out new growth, and they're growing quicker than probably any plant I've ever owned. I swear a branch on my Carrie grew half an inch just overnight. There's other things to look forward too as well, like whether my psidium longipetiolum will actually survive my 8a winters once it gets large enough to go in ground. With reports of it surviving 14-19 f, it seems promising. So even if my cats insist on killing a quarter of my plants, I have reasons to keep going.

With as many setbacks as you may face in this hobby, it's best to look at what you've accomplished, and what you will accomplish. Think of all the fruit that you've gotten to try that would otherwise have been unavailable to you. Think of everything you've learned along the way, and the people you've met on this forum, I know I'm certainly thankful for that.

Another thing to keep in mind is that you may have some things available to you in Tennessee that others may not. For example, I wanted to keep freshwater stingrays for the longest time, but they're illegal in Georgia. I even looked into getting a permit to keep them, but the amount of hoops you have to jump through just makes it not worth it. They're also illegal in Florida, California, and Texas, all states where you can grow a lot of these tropical fruits, but they're not illegal in Tennessee. Now, I doubt you'll go buy a 400 gallon aquarium tomorrow to go keep stingrays, but my point is that you may be able to do some things in Tennessee that people in those warmer states may not be able to do.

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I bought $40 worth of african annona seeds, none of them germinated, and to add insult to injury, the cats used the pots as litter boxes.
Me too! Those african annona seeds on etsy looked so good. But nothing germinated. And my cats love using my pots as litter boxes. I cut cardboard and put it over the top of them all! Time to toss the cats and keep the plants

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Even squirrels will dig up newly planted trees out side
they think it's a Bulb or food they dug

You better put down cayenne pepper in soil

Also get a spray bottle  make a spray with bitter stuff like tea for plants leaves
(my sister just bought some 10 bucks (bitter spray also contained citrus )

 could of spent a dollar on spray bottle, and a dollar on crappy tea at store
(or used outside bitter stuff with high tannin which I have already)


I Love my cats, but they eat my plants as well
(I was going to bobby trap out side plant with pull string fire works
 dog or rabbit  ate expensive plant as well when I was younger) -- (no this would not hurt him.)


Polypterus

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I bought $40 worth of african annona seeds, none of them germinated, and to add insult to injury, the cats used the pots as litter boxes.
Me too! Those african annona seeds on etsy looked so good. But nothing germinated. And my cats love using my pots as litter boxes. I cut cardboard and put it over the top of them all! Time to toss the cats and keep the plants
I'll have to try that when this winter rolls around. I was initially thinking about a layer of lava rock on top of the soil, as I've read cats don't like to walk on it, but the cardboard seems like it would be better for more delicate seedlings.

Jaboticaba45

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I'm in a fairly similar boat as you are. Just a little further south in 8a, and a year or two ahead of you.

I started collecting and growing these plants during my senior year of high school, and it all started with just some peppers, tomatoes, and a blueberry bush. After I discovered I could buy mango and guava seedlings off ebay, into the rabbit hole I went. I bought a lot of 3 gallon trees that year, almost entirely cherimoya, atemoya, and sugar apple. Three flowered, two set fruit, but for a number of reasons, they dropped them after a few months. Now that I better know what I'm doing, hopefully this will be the year.

There were a number of times where I considered cutting my losses where I'm at now and giving up. I bought $40 worth of african annona seeds, none of them germinated, and to add insult to injury, the cats used the pots as litter boxes. The other thing I constantly wonder is, when is it enough? Between audio, custom keyboards, computers, and aquariums, when should I stop funneling money into this and focus more on those hobbies? Am I even going to be able to care for the plants I have now come 3-5 years, much less the ones I plan to buy? I'm sure everyone has had set backs in this hobby, doubts enter their mind, moments where they asked themselves "is it worth it?", but I find it's best to focus on the good.

My doctor white cherimoya is a solid 4-5 ft with a 1 inch trunk, I'll be damned if it doesn't flower and set fruit this year. I know it's ready. My booth, AP, and sugar apple are all right behind it too, so worst case scenario, it'll be next year. That comes quicker than you'd think. In place of those african annonas, I now have A. vepretorum and A. monticola seeds that just recently sprouted and are growing like weeds; I'd be astonished if I managed to kill them with the level of vigor they're showing. My mangos are also finally putting out new growth, and they're growing quicker than probably any plant I've ever owned. I swear a branch on my Carrie grew half an inch just overnight. There's other things to look forward too as well, like whether my psidium longipetiolum will actually survive my 8a winters once it gets large enough to go in ground. With reports of it surviving 14-19 f, it seems promising. So even if my cats insist on killing a quarter of my plants, I have reasons to keep going.

With as many setbacks as you may face in this hobby, it's best to look at what you've accomplished, and what you will accomplish. Think of all the fruit that you've gotten to try that would otherwise have been unavailable to you. Think of everything you've learned along the way, and the people you've met on this forum, I know I'm certainly thankful for that.

Another thing to keep in mind is that you may have some things available to you in Tennessee that others may not. For example, I wanted to keep freshwater stingrays for the longest time, but they're illegal in Georgia. I even looked into getting a permit to keep them, but the amount of hoops you have to jump through just makes it not worth it. They're also illegal in Florida, California, and Texas, all states where you can grow a lot of these tropical fruits, but they're not illegal in Tennessee. Now, I doubt you'll go buy a 400 gallon aquarium tomorrow to go keep stingrays, but my point is that you may be able to do some things in Tennessee that people in those warmer states may not be able to do.
I've been into the aquascaping hobby a bit cause of my friends, but gave up on it after seeing that plants are better.
I've faced a lot of losses so far. For example, take the yangmei. I participated in 2 group orders, and didn't get a single tree to survive. I spent 100's of dollars trying to get those things to grow. But I still persisted and now have 3 trees that are alive and well. If I stopped I would never had succeeded. I'm glad the psidium I gave you is doing well. I heard they are cold tolerant to 15, but I brought mine out in 32 degree weather and it got beat up.
There are setbacks, but at least for the most part 98% of what I have grows here, maybe just at a slower rate.

Jaboticaba45

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Hey Ryan,

With every obstacle you overcome, you become that much more knowledgeable in growing tropical/subtropical fruit trees. Iíve killed many fruit trees and faced many of the same issues you listed and if you love growing fruit trees, you will find a way to jump any hurdles that pop up.

Try growing the red hybrid Jaboticaba, that one will fruit much sooner than the others and it tastes great.

Simon
Thanks for the encouragement Simon. I remember when I was at Pine Island Nursery buying my first jaboticaba. I believe I was in the 4th or 5th grade...Someone handed me PIN's handout with all the trees they sold and wow was I amazed that there were so many trees. Now I look at my knowledge of fruit trees and realize that there are way more plants that I know about now. I've come a long ways now. I recently picked up a couple reds last summer, but still think they need another year or two. I realize now that this is such a cool hobby to be in.

Jaboticaba45

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And here I am, desperately wanting to try a paw paw after reading all the descriptions (too warm to grow here) lol  Always some holy grail out there to entice us 😁
yep, there are lots of wild pawpaw trees here, but most of the time the animals eat them first. I've never tried a named cultivar, only wild ones. The wild ones are good, but can be gritty. I was tubing down a river last summer and stumbled upon an island in the middle of the river filled with pawpaws. Unfortunately, they were not ripe.

Jaboticaba45

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When I was in high school I was obsessed with trying to grow orchids on trees here in SoCal.  I failed so much but succeeded just enough to keep trying.  Several years later, after I had already figured out the trick, I read in an orchid society magazine that a guy just a half hour from where I had lived in high school had some trees covered in orchids. 

Here you are in high school obsessed with your own planty challenge but you've got this forum, youtube, instagram and countless other sites with so much useful information. 

Basically I had to walk to school 10 miles uphill both ways through 10 feet of snow...  :o
Thats a good point. There are so many resources out there. I've been able to get so much knowledge from those sites.

Polypterus

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I'm in a fairly similar boat as you are. Just a little further south in 8a, and a year or two ahead of you.

I started collecting and growing these plants during my senior year of high school, and it all started with just some peppers, tomatoes, and a blueberry bush. After I discovered I could buy mango and guava seedlings off ebay, into the rabbit hole I went. I bought a lot of 3 gallon trees that year, almost entirely cherimoya, atemoya, and sugar apple. Three flowered, two set fruit, but for a number of reasons, they dropped them after a few months. Now that I better know what I'm doing, hopefully this will be the year.

There were a number of times where I considered cutting my losses where I'm at now and giving up. I bought $40 worth of african annona seeds, none of them germinated, and to add insult to injury, the cats used the pots as litter boxes. The other thing I constantly wonder is, when is it enough? Between audio, custom keyboards, computers, and aquariums, when should I stop funneling money into this and focus more on those hobbies? Am I even going to be able to care for the plants I have now come 3-5 years, much less the ones I plan to buy? I'm sure everyone has had set backs in this hobby, doubts enter their mind, moments where they asked themselves "is it worth it?", but I find it's best to focus on the good.

My doctor white cherimoya is a solid 4-5 ft with a 1 inch trunk, I'll be damned if it doesn't flower and set fruit this year. I know it's ready. My booth, AP, and sugar apple are all right behind it too, so worst case scenario, it'll be next year. That comes quicker than you'd think. In place of those african annonas, I now have A. vepretorum and A. monticola seeds that just recently sprouted and are growing like weeds; I'd be astonished if I managed to kill them with the level of vigor they're showing. My mangos are also finally putting out new growth, and they're growing quicker than probably any plant I've ever owned. I swear a branch on my Carrie grew half an inch just overnight. There's other things to look forward too as well, like whether my psidium longipetiolum will actually survive my 8a winters once it gets large enough to go in ground. With reports of it surviving 14-19 f, it seems promising. So even if my cats insist on killing a quarter of my plants, I have reasons to keep going.

With as many setbacks as you may face in this hobby, it's best to look at what you've accomplished, and what you will accomplish. Think of all the fruit that you've gotten to try that would otherwise have been unavailable to you. Think of everything you've learned along the way, and the people you've met on this forum, I know I'm certainly thankful for that.

Another thing to keep in mind is that you may have some things available to you in Tennessee that others may not. For example, I wanted to keep freshwater stingrays for the longest time, but they're illegal in Georgia. I even looked into getting a permit to keep them, but the amount of hoops you have to jump through just makes it not worth it. They're also illegal in Florida, California, and Texas, all states where you can grow a lot of these tropical fruits, but they're not illegal in Tennessee. Now, I doubt you'll go buy a 400 gallon aquarium tomorrow to go keep stingrays, but my point is that you may be able to do some things in Tennessee that people in those warmer states may not be able to do.
I've been into the aquascaping hobby a bit cause of my friends, but gave up on it after seeing that plants are better.
I've faced a lot of losses so far. For example, take the yangmei. I participated in 2 group orders, and didn't get a single tree to survive. I spent 100's of dollars trying to get those things to grow. But I still persisted and now have 3 trees that are alive and well. If I stopped I would never had succeeded. I'm glad the psidium I gave you is doing well. I heard they are cold tolerant to 15, but I brought mine out in 32 degree weather and it got beat up.
There are setbacks, but at least for the most part 98% of what I have grows here, maybe just at a slower rate.
I don't plan to let that psidium see cold weather until it gets a solid 0.5-1 inch trunk on it. Losses are just going to be a part of this hobby. I can't tell you how many hundreds in dollars of rare fish I've lost, and it tore me up every time. Always due to freak accidents too, fish gets sucked into the filter, the water I used for a water change was a few degrees too cold, some random disease gets introduced into the tank that I don't have medication on hand for. I assumed some of the same losses would happen when I started this hobby.

Also, I wouldn't entirely give up on annonas quite yet. It might just be the species you're growing, the seeds you're using, or the soil you're using. I'm sure you can get at least one species to work for you. Pawpaws might also be of interest to you, since they're the closest relative we have to annonas in a temperate climate.

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Don't sweat it friend. It is all part of the journey. I have killed some of every type of tree that is popular MULTIPLE TIMES :( :) >:( ;D :o ???!!!! Take the hardships as a learning opportunity and document your successes so you and other can benefit in the future.

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Keep enjoying your hobby, tropical fruit growers! :)
« Last Edit: May 05, 2022, 03:43:39 PM by johnb51 »
John

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Hey Ryan,

With every obstacle you overcome, you become that much more knowledgeable in growing tropical/subtropical fruit trees. Iíve killed many fruit trees and faced many of the same issues you listed and if you love growing fruit trees, you will find a way to jump any hurdles that pop up.

Try growing the red hybrid Jaboticaba, that one will fruit much sooner than the others and it tastes great.

Simon

Thanks for the encouragement Simon. I remember when I was at Pine Island Nursery buying my first jaboticaba. I believe I was in the 4th or 5th grade...Someone handed me PIN's handout with all the trees they sold and wow was I amazed that there were so many trees. Now I look at my knowledge of fruit trees and realize that there are way more plants that I know about now. I've come a long ways now. I recently picked up a couple reds last summer, but still think they need another year or two. I realize now that this is such a cool hobby to be in.


Hey Ryan, I'm going to be a shill here and suggest you play around with hydroponics ^_^

Here is my thread on my hydro red from seed - https://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=47159.msg458240

Here is some more 'inspiration' from a guy in Sweden..

Hydro coffee: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9C_bXUtYP9M

Hydro guava: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mH3t7Y4dZCE
« Last Edit: May 04, 2022, 07:30:02 PM by socalbalcony2 »

CarolinaZone

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Don't sweat it friend. It is all part of the journey. I have killed some of every type of tree that is popular MULTIPLE TIMES :( :) >:( ;D :o ???!!!! Take the hardships as a learning opportunity and document your successes so you and other can benefit in the future.
BTW Did I ever tell you guys about how I wiped out Nishigawa avocado? I had bought some stuff whose name I don't remember and it purported to raise brix. So, I mixed it up and did a foliar feed on my plants. I go in the house and think nothing about it. The next day I came outside and I was shocked. Cherry of the Rio grande:Normal. Barbados Cherry:Normal. Muntingia: a little tip burn. Nishigawa: looked like someone hit it with a flame thrower. I have seen stuff defoliate a plant but I never seen anything actually BURN THE TRUNK. Damn! I wish I could remember the name of that snake oil. Paid $20 and I killed about $200 worth of trees. ;D ;D ;D ;D Live and you learn.

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At least I hope that taxi Driver enjoyed his fruit ,
 and the tree's I tore out of pit in September  did good for him. (it was also more than a $120 fare)

And here I am, desperately wanting to try a paw paw after reading all the descriptions (too warm to grow here) lol  Always some holy grail out there to entice us 😁

You posted at same time

(9A zone in florida people in Gainsville grew pawpaw
there is a Nursery
In CA pawpaw grows in hotter zones I hear , but for some reason not FL.

Could it be the soil even the late Jerry Lehman which breed them added Sulfur in midwest
In Florida I would add Sulfur (it's cheap) maybe raised mounds in mulch

How High is the PH probably very alkaline

I was/am concerned that I don't have the chill hours.  So, do they really tatste like mango, banana and pineapple? 😁

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Ryan, I can understand your frustrations- being a zone pusher is seeing many of your cherished and rare plants die

A few constructive points- It may benefit you to dig out the floor of your greenhouse if possible- look into something called a pit garden, which usually are dug about six feet into the ground.

The idea here is that you are below the frost line which should prevent any of your roots from freezing, you may need to add a layer of organic material on top to act as a top soil since all of that will be removed.

This also gives you the benefit of additional height to your greenhouse for some of the taller things. If you really want a perfect greenhouse set up you should look into something like and arduino controlled unit that has a significant number of sensors and outputs.

Also worth noting rare fruits do not always mean tropical ones, although we mostly focus on the tropical on this forum there are plenty of rare temperate fruits. (honeyberries, pawpaw, goumi and others are all becoming more popular for example)

Since we are on the subject of pawpaw they need a significant amount of chill and we grow them successfully in Michigan 5b with no protection. All the ones in Houston look miserable and do not fruit. (I am not familiar with the more recently developed cultivars that may require fewer or no chill hours though) The fruit might be my favorite Annona, although sometimes they are quite seedy.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2022, 01:54:22 PM by elouicious »

Filozophr

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Some of my annona seedling leaves died from frost this year in ZONE 10 A, itís gonna be incredibly difficult to grow annona up north
Feel free to pm me if you have any ANNONACEAE for sale‼️

Walt

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The pit greenhouse is for real.  I had a 20' by 20' pit greenhouse in central Kansas, zone 6.  Tomatoes and pappers wintered in it with no added heat.
But for growing tropical fruits up north, read what Kumin and I have written on breeding hardy citrus.  And SoCal2warm (I think I miss spelled that.  Sorry) in the north west might have good information for your zone.  You can search these names on this forum.
And in Europe, Ilya11 and Mikkel and others post on their efforts.  Ilya especially has been in this a long time.
And a man in Tennessee has started working on hardy kumquats.  He doesn't post here.
Of course, not every kind of fruit can be adapted to non tropical areas.  Not with today's methods.  But you are young and may live to see mangoes etc. in the north.
For now, a pit greenhouse and rare on tropical fruits are good ideas.

BayAreaMicroClimate

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I have learned to love my climate here in Bay Area CA. Cold enough to grow pawpaw and stone fruits but warm enough to grow starfruit outside. To me the challenge of being one of the first people to get tropical/rare things to grow here is fun. Mangos die super easy but there are people that have done it with proper care. Even heard of people getting Wax Jambu, lychee, black sapote to survive in micro climates but they do better in greenhouse. Eugenias seem to do great outside but a lot of stuff is borderline too cold. Stuff Iíve found will never get through winter without greenhouse is things like sugar apple, soursop ďone of my favorite fruits :( ď Mamey sapote but green sapote has been known to survive. Iím excited to experiment with rare somewhat cold hardy annonas like globiflora,rugulosa, spinescens ect... Even in this sub tropical climate I still find my 10x12 greenhouse overfilled with tropicals. Iím 26 years old now and also hope to get property in Florida or other similar climate to fulfill my tropical obsession

 

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