Author Topic: Mango alongside Durian  (Read 1123 times)

DurianLover

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Re: Mango alongside Durian
« Reply #25 on: July 16, 2022, 03:38:21 AM »


DL & Fliptop - A lot of my American friends donít know travel restrictions remain in place for non-Americans. So with mango feasts postponed, I flew east....And youíre right,  I probably should have done a play by play. But I wanted a low key just soak it all in trip. Maybe next time. With that said, you know I kept SOME notes. So, if you want me to drop a list of what varieties I scored and which ones I rated most highly....

PS DL - are you in Sri Lanka now?  Mad stuff happening there.


I thought you went to Malaysia with "approval paper" from a "friendly doctor".  But I just checked travel restrictions, and they don't have the same rule as US. That's weird, because they were like stricktest in the world during last couple years. If US does not let up, you should consider that option. Still enough time to catch mangoes :)

PS. Not in Sri Lanka at the moment.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2022, 03:42:35 AM by DurianLover »

Future

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Re: Mango alongside Durian
« Reply #26 on: July 16, 2022, 11:42:36 AM »
Future, when I have spent time with Gary at his place in CR our mutual interests are pouterias, artocarpus, garcinias, and the more rare fruits that I grow and that Gary is really interested in. He had a mango project in Guanacaste and grows different mangoes around his two properties near Orotina. When in season he shares lots of different mangoes that to me are wonderful but he is demanding and critical. Itís fascinating his stories about mangoes but the individual varieties are many and we donít attempt to grow them so Iím not the person to really answer your question.
Peter

Thank you for your insights Peter.  If you recall any names of what you enjoyed, Iíd be interested bNext time I get to Florida, if heís around and I get the chance, Iíll pick brain wrt which ones have worked.  Heís discerning for sure which has been a boon for consumers. Itís also a sobering story that someone as geared up as him finds it a stretch in the area. Those less experienced and resourced have been warned.

So far it seems Hawaii has the closest thing to an environment supporting both, albeit even there bifurcated.  Thailand is another curiously as it seems to do well with both. However as Alex has posted elsewhere, their mango production may only exist due to chemical fertilizer induction.

Future

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Re: Mango alongside Durian
« Reply #27 on: July 16, 2022, 11:47:14 AM »


DL & Fliptop - A lot of my American friends donít know travel restrictions remain in place for non-Americans. So with mango feasts postponed, I flew east....And youíre right,  I probably should have done a play by play. But I wanted a low key just soak it all in trip. Maybe next time. With that said, you know I kept SOME notes. So, if you want me to drop a list of what varieties I scored and which ones I rated most highly....

PS DL - are you in Sri Lanka now?  Mad stuff happening there.


I thought you went to Malaysia with "approval paper" from a "friendly doctor".  But I just checked travel restrictions, and they don't have the same rule as US. That's weird, because they were like stricktest in the world during last couple years. If US does not let up, you should consider that option. Still enough time to catch mangoes :)

PS. Not in Sri Lanka at the moment.

I was in Malaysia for 3 weeks. Like most of SE Asia, theyíve opened up with only a quarantine required for the unvaccinated.  Lindsay negotiated with two durian farms to host quarantining guests - 5 days with freedom across 20 acres of durian, cempedak, mangosteen etc was a good deal.  Entry into Malaysia was seamless and they ended my quarantine after 3 days via management app they use.

Finca La Isla

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Re: Mango alongside Durian
« Reply #28 on: July 16, 2022, 06:38:40 PM »
Future, like Hawaii, Costa Rica has Šreas good enough for mangoes. CR is a commercial exporter of mostly Tommy.  Seasonally, Haden and lots of other, newer selections from Florida and locally are available.
But durians donít grow well in those areas.
I donít know that much about Thailand but I donít think Malaysia has anywhere to grow mangoes as good as the CR central and northern pacific areas. I think theyíre still too humid for Garyís preference but youíll have to ask him.
Iím Hawaii itís a much shorter distance between the wet and dry zones. One difference is that Iím only 9 degrees N instead of more than 20N
Peter

spencerw

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Re: Mango alongside Durian
« Reply #29 on: July 17, 2022, 01:56:41 PM »
It takes me an hour and a half to get to the dry side of hawaii. Everyone grows mangos in east hawaii, they just don't fruit well. In most of the parks there are 100 year old mangos that produce. Just they are very small, very fibrous and always end up with anthracnose. A lady I work for has a 100 year old mango next to her 40 year old durian. They both produce, but mangos aren't very good. And the durian is amazing. You can always tarp your mango during the flowering season so buds don't get knocked off. Our county extension office does that with their mangos

Future

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Re: Mango alongside Durian
« Reply #30 on: July 17, 2022, 05:40:45 PM »
Thank you Peter and Spencer.

Wrt tarps, is it winds or rain or both damaging flowers?  What happens with pollination if using tarps?


My earlier reference to tarps was regarding placing them around the tre to simulate dry season. Itís a technique thatís employed in some too wet places. 

So Peter thereís not one Zill mango name you recall enjoying?

arvind

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Re: Mango alongside Durian
« Reply #31 on: July 18, 2022, 01:39:25 AM »
Whatís up TFF.
In Malaysia outside of Perlis and northern Kedah mangoes don't seem to grow well. You can still find some small farms that grow mangoes outside of those two states and the mangoes grown are mostly chokonan mangoes from thailand.those farms can be found in Malacca and negeri sembilan and central sarawak.in Kedah and Perlis it's harummanis.also mangoes unlike durian are grown in flat terrains.over all mangoes seem to grow well in urban areas and coastal areas in Malaysia .in urban areas trees seem to flower well when being grown next to an asphalt road or concrete sidewalks.i wonder it could be the heat emitting from the ground

Which part of Malaysia do you live in?  How do you rate Harumanis?  I saw trees with flowers in urban areas. Heat wonít trigger mango flowering but the asphalt and concrete might be restricting water.
I'm in Sarawak in a district called bau about 1 hour from kuching.harummanis is a great mango and it's exported to japan.it only fruits well in Perlis and northern Kedah.theres a short dry season starting from December to February there which is abnormal and unlike other region in malaysia.just Google  alor star and check the annual rainfall .here in Kuching Sarawak the lowest rainfall is in July with 120mm of rainfall and still wet for mangoes.also mangoes look horrible in my hometown and in Kuching in some of those urban areas it blooms better than in bau

Future

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Re: Mango alongside Durian
« Reply #32 on: July 18, 2022, 11:51:45 AM »
Whatís up TFF.
In Malaysia outside of Perlis and northern Kedah mangoes don't seem to grow well. You can still find some small farms that grow mangoes outside of those two states and the mangoes grown are mostly chokonan mangoes from thailand.those farms can be found in Malacca and negeri sembilan and central sarawak.in Kedah and Perlis it's harummanis.also mangoes unlike durian are grown in flat terrains.over all mangoes seem to grow well in urban areas and coastal areas in Malaysia .in urban areas trees seem to flower well when being grown next to an asphalt road or concrete sidewalks.i wonder it could be the heat emitting from the ground

Which part of Malaysia do you live in?  How do you rate Harumanis?  I saw trees with flowers in urban areas. Heat wonít trigger mango flowering but the asphalt and concrete might be restricting water.
I'm in Sarawak in a district called bau about 1 hour from kuching.harummanis is a great mango and it's exported to japan.it only fruits well in Perlis and northern Kedah.theres a short dry season starting from December to February there which is abnormal and unlike other region in malaysia.just Google  alor star and check the annual rainfall .here in Kuching Sarawak the lowest rainfall is in July with 120mm of rainfall and still wet for mangoes.also mangoes look horrible in my hometown and in Kuching in some of those urban areas it blooms better than in bau

Thatís interesting. It may make the case for growing mango in areas where Durian do well using impervious tarps around the trunk for several months.  Flowers that set fruit in rain would still be probably essential.

spencerw

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Re: Mango alongside Durian
« Reply #33 on: July 18, 2022, 01:12:39 PM »
Sorry I should have been a bit specific as tarps isn't quite the right way to describe it. So the extension office was doing an experiment where they keep the mango tree very small. Six feet tall and wide. Around the tree is a structure we here call pipe tents. Similar to an easy up, but more permanent. People use them for car ports or nurseries or temporary structures. So utilizing a 10x10' structure around the tree. During flowering season they will place a clear roof over the structure very similar to a nursery greenhouse without any sides. This prevents the rain from hitting the flowers as they are forming and opening. I believe this may also prevent anthracnose from forming at this time. I'm not exactly sure how long they keep the tree out of the rain. Is it the full fruit production? So the anthracnose doesn't form on the fruits? I only saw the trees during non flowering season. I'd like to try with one tree maybe. But its not for commercial production as it would be too much effort, so just good for the home grower

Future

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Re: Mango alongside Durian
« Reply #34 on: July 18, 2022, 07:07:20 PM »
Sorry I should have been a bit specific as tarps isn't quite the right way to describe it. So the extension office was doing an experiment where they keep the mango tree very small. Six feet tall and wide. Around the tree is a structure we here call pipe tents. Similar to an easy up, but more permanent. People use them for car ports or nurseries or temporary structures. So utilizing a 10x10' structure around the tree. During flowering season they will place a clear roof over the structure very similar to a nursery greenhouse without any sides. This prevents the rain from hitting the flowers as they are forming and opening. I believe this may also prevent anthracnose from forming at this time. I'm not exactly sure how long they keep the tree out of the rain. Is it the full fruit production? So the anthracnose doesn't form on the fruits? I only saw the trees during non flowering season. I'd like to try with one tree maybe. But its not for commercial production as it would be too much effort, so just good for the home grower

Thank you. That makes total sense.  Add a tarp under the tree and flower induction could also be done. But yes, itís a small scale only solution. The # of mango trees in Malaysia clearly indicate people love the fruit - despite lots on non-production. The setup you describe reminds me of a concept Dr. Richard Campbell described but in this case for cold protection. Itís essentially a giant tarp-like retractable roof that can roll down side rails and is deployed when cold strikes in Florida. I imagine if a clear plastic was used a setup might host dozens of trees below it. Will need to investigate. 

fruit nerd

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Re: Mango alongside Durian
« Reply #35 on: July 18, 2022, 07:40:34 PM »
I asked a similar question here regarding covering mangoes during flowering - https://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=47487.0. Sounds promising anyway.

Future

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Re: Mango alongside Durian
« Reply #36 on: July 19, 2022, 01:42:37 PM »
I asked a similar question here regarding covering mangoes during flowering - https://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=47487.0. Sounds promising anyway.

Got it.

These are a bit too high end but simpler versions that rollout and back with transparent tops and sides that open would work. A decent amount of backyard trees could be covered up to small commercial scale. Trees would need to be ones that produce at small size, like Orange Sherbet. More searching to do.

https://rollacover.com/products-gallery/

Future

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Re: Mango alongside Durian
« Reply #37 on: July 23, 2022, 06:49:13 PM »
I asked a similar question here regarding covering mangoes during flowering - https://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=47487.0. Sounds promising anyway.

I see Lindsay posted as far back as 2013 her durian adventures with some members here in Puerto Rico. They have a dry season so I presume irrigate plenty up to a point. With trees having been there for 100 years, I wonder whatís survived the longest. Hurricanes would appear devastating to durian. Iím reaching out to see who I can contact given the powerful direct hit hurricane hitting the place a few years ago. Other than that, it might be a good mango alongside durian location.

Bush2Beach

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Re: Mango alongside Durian
« Reply #38 on: July 24, 2022, 12:02:12 PM »
Bryan would be a good person to ask how the Durians are doing in PR.

cbss_daviefl

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Re: Mango alongside Durian
« Reply #39 on: July 24, 2022, 12:37:58 PM »
Panoramic fruits in Puerto Rico has documented some info on the effects of a direct hit from hurricane Maria. We ate plenty of durian there last year. Puerto Rico has many different microclimates and I believe there are large commercial mango farms but we never bothered with those when we visit. It also is quite a bit easier to travel there.

https://www.panoramicfruit.com/about-hurricane-maria.html
Brandon

 

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