Author Topic: Makrut lime  (Read 352 times)

sc4001992

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Makrut lime
« on: November 22, 2022, 06:21:56 PM »
I have a Makrut lime tree which has been giving some fruits. I know people like to use the leaves for cooking, dishes.

I wanted to ask if anyone ever use the juice from this fruit. It seems to have lots of juice in each small fruit so it is nice, but I didn't know if it can be used for anything.

Here's my fruit photos.




vnomonee

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Re: Makrut lime
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2022, 06:24:56 PM »
I liked the juice in ramen and over tacos. Try not to get the oils from the peel when you squeeze it or it will taste like kerosene

Eggo

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Re: Makrut lime
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2022, 06:45:04 PM »
How was the juice?  It's been a long time but I recall the kaffir lime juice being somewhat bitter vs a traditional lime.  On another note, the zest on the lime can be substituted for whatever the leaves are used for.  My grandma said that traditionally growing up the zest was what we used but leaves are substituted when the fruits are not available.  These days I believe the leaves seem to have overtaken the zest in popularity and use.

sc4001992

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Re: Makrut lime
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2022, 07:31:44 PM »
Yes, you're right, I just squeezed it like a lemon and boy was it bad. It had such a strong taste, not like a lemon or lime I ever tasted. Ok, on the next ones I will try to remove the peel first before squeezing the juice and try again.

Tasted like kerosene.

palingkecil

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Re: Makrut lime
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2022, 07:46:31 PM »
In Indonesia, we use the juice for almost everything. We marinate meat and seafood in this juice with a little salt before cooking it. If you don't want the meat too sour, just rinse it before cooking. This juice washes away any fishy/ stench smell off.

I make beef salad with this juice. Like the one in a Thai restaurant. Just grill the beef as you prefer (medium rare is my preference) with a pinch of salt, then slice it as thin as you could, put it aside. Slice red onion and cherry tomato about 1/3 of the weight of the meat, I add some sliced Thai bird chili for a kick, mix everything with the meat, pour in the makrut juice, add a teaspoon of sugar and half teaspoon of salt per 2 lbs of meat (if you like it more salty, add more salt), mix well. You can serve it right away or keep it in the fridge for half an hour for the flavor to soak in.
The meat can be substituted with shrimp, squid, or fish fillet. add some cilantro if you like it.
We also like to mix a small amount of makrut juice with peanut sauce that we serve over blanched veggies.
I also always add some makrut juice when I serve a bowl of hot chicken soup.








 
« Last Edit: November 22, 2022, 08:08:32 PM by palingkecil »

sc4001992

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Re: Makrut lime
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2022, 09:49:18 PM »
Diana, wow, good to know the juice has many uses for cooking. The beef salad sounds good.

Here's a few photo of my fruits, it doesn't get that many fruits on the tree yet.




LittleCitrusLover

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Re: Makrut lime
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2022, 10:04:20 PM »
I use the juice for citrus chicken marinades all the time. Very fragrant and flavorful.

palingkecil

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Re: Makrut lime
« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2022, 10:25:31 PM »
Diana, wow, good to know the juice has many uses for cooking. The beef salad sounds good.

Here's a few photo of my fruits, it doesn't get that many fruits on the tree yet.




Your tree looks healthy, Kaz. Makrut lime is really productive, in a few years you will be drown in citrus. When I have too many Makrut limes, I squeeze all the juice, mix it with baking soda and dish detergent, then use the mix to clean all my tiles and bathtub. Works as good as vinegar, plus my home smells very citrusy afterward.
Btw, my white Peruvian guava produces a lot of fruit this year, but they taste really bland. I think my gardener set up the drip system too often.

Flgarden

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Re: Makrut lime
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2022, 09:33:30 AM »
I added a little of kaffir lime juice to salmon dish  without tasting it first. Big mistake... Its not like any other limes. Its strong and bitter. I am not sure how people like it but i am ready to cull my tree since i have no use of fruits.
Ana

palingkecil

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Re: Makrut lime
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2022, 11:32:46 AM »
I added a little of kaffir lime juice to salmon dish  without tasting it first. Big mistake... Its not like any other limes. Its strong and bitter. I am not sure how people like it but i am ready to cull my tree since i have no use of fruits.
Ana
Yes, you are right, Makrut lime is stronger than other citrus juice. The key to avoid biterness is, we cannot squeeze this lime too hard like lemon or other lime. Just squeeze it lightly. It is also a little more acidic than regular lemon, so a little goes a long way.
Another thing, we always let makrut limes turn yellow and ripe before pick it. This was they are less acidic and almost no bitterness.

Lovetoplant

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Re: Makrut lime
« Reply #10 on: November 24, 2022, 08:10:48 PM »
Thai people do not use juice from the fruits.  We only use it's rinds as part of curry ingredients.

 

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