Author Topic: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8  (Read 7516 times)

D-Grower

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #50 on: February 12, 2020, 11:51:54 AM »
A few more plants to add to my find list:

Sweet Cicely aka Myrrhis odorata
Turkish Rocket
Fuki aka Petasites Japonicus
Glycyrrhiza Lepidota aka wild licorice
Glycyrrhiza glabra aka true licorice
Senna alexandria
Edible/nitrogen fixing locust trees(honey, black, etc)
Hops aka Humulus lupus
« Last Edit: February 12, 2020, 03:45:23 PM by D-Grower »
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SeaWalnut

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #51 on: February 12, 2020, 10:40:00 PM »
A few more plants to add to my find list:

Sweet Cicely aka Myrrhis odorata
Turkish Rocket
Fuki aka Petasites Japonicus
Glycyrrhiza Lepidota aka wild licorice
Glycyrrhiza glabra aka true licorice
Senna alexandria
Edible/nitrogen fixing locust trees(honey, black, etc)
Hops aka Humulus lupus
I have 2 hectares of black locust trees on top of a hill.Its basically a wild forest there.
They make a ton of honey per hectare in 2-3 weeks when they are in bloom.
The honey of the black locust its clear almost like water and smells like black locust flowers.It is also expensive,costs double than regular honey.
Its not a tree native to europe( its american tree) but we are famous for the vlack locust honey here.
For warmer places there is also the mexican black locust with pink flowers instead of white.
The honey locust its not that good for bees as the black locust.
Ive ate the pods of honey locust and they are sweet sour but also bitter.Nobody eats them here thogh my grandfather told me he ate them in 1945 when it was famine.

D-Grower

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #52 on: February 13, 2020, 08:01:51 AM »
That's good to know thanks for the info!

A couple more plants I'm looking for:

Wormwood(tried seeds many times without any success does anyone have a live plant available)
True lavender (have started from seed before but seedlings end up dying at a few inches tall. Anyone have a fairly established plant?)
Rhodiola (again seeds without luck several times. Once got a live dug up wild one from out west but it sadly died. Would like another go at one!)
Cat's Claw
Devil's claw
Real Damiana T. diffusa(should grow wild out west)
« Last Edit: February 13, 2020, 08:09:17 AM by D-Grower »
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Pokeweed

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #53 on: February 13, 2020, 08:27:19 AM »
Some of the nurseries here sell wormwood plants. I planted one and it got huge! Took over the bed. D

D-Grower

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #54 on: February 13, 2020, 12:05:42 PM »
Does it sucker off small plants at its base or anything?
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Pokeweed

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #55 on: February 14, 2020, 08:59:58 AM »
Mine did. Check out the Oikos nursery site. I didn't know there were so many varieties of Jerusalem Artichoke! I hate spell correction!
« Last Edit: February 17, 2020, 08:48:58 AM by Pokeweed »

D-Grower

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #56 on: February 18, 2020, 07:46:07 AM »
More to add to the find it list:

Murnong
Passiflora caerula
Sweet potato varieties
Different colored oca(just fit a reddish colored one from a member. Very excited to grow it!) Would like blue and green etc if anyone has any
Easy flowering carrots for the deep south
Queen Anne's lace
Tuberous pea
Chufa
Duckweed
Parsnip
Skirret
Kales
The blue and green and white turmeric
Blue and green ginger types
« Last Edit: February 18, 2020, 08:41:23 AM by D-Grower »
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Pokeweed

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #57 on: February 18, 2020, 09:06:41 AM »
I think queen Ann's lace crosses with carrots and lowers their quality. D

D-Grower

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #58 on: February 18, 2020, 10:44:02 AM »
I believe I read they readily cross too.
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D-Grower

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #59 on: February 22, 2020, 08:54:18 AM »
More species for the find list:

Salad burnet
Fenugreek
Oyster leaf
Burdock
Yarrow
Feverfew
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D-Grower

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #60 on: February 23, 2020, 09:12:10 AM »
Anyone got sherbet berry growing that's available?

On a side note local silver thorn bushes are in heavy fruit. They really aren't bad at all. Mild sweet with otherwise pleasant flavor. More seed than fruit but they do have a fair amount of meat to them. Anyone wants some let me know. Probably a good graft stock for autumn olive and goumi etc.
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Pokeweed

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #61 on: February 24, 2020, 09:04:07 AM »
Agaritas are a native bush in S. Tx that make tasty but very seedy berries. They would grow for you. D

D-Grower

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #62 on: February 24, 2020, 11:15:59 AM »
Thanks for the recommendation! Sounds like an interesting species. Always down to try anything. Not worried about seediness at all. I prefer things that reliably produce over absolute quality. It's nice to fund plants of both quality and production but isn't a big deal here.
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Francis_Eric

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #63 on: September 14, 2020, 10:09:05 AM »
Thanks for the shoutout D-Grower!  If anyone's curious about the nursery, the website is www.wanderlustnursery.com.  We'll be adding all sorts of few new offerings in March, so check us out.  In addition to what I've seen posted here so far, here are some other fun plants we grow in zone 8b:

Figs
- Ficus carica (Common Fig, many varieties)
- Ficus johannis ssp. Afghanistanica (Afghan Fig)
- Ficus palmata (Punjab Fig)
Wineberries
- Aristotelia chilensis (Chilean Wineberry, Maqui)
- Aristotelia serrata (Mountain Wineberry)
Palms
- Allagoptera arenaria (Seashore Palm)
- Parajubaea torralyi (Bolivian Mountain Coconut)
Myrtaceae
- Luma apiculata (Luma, Arrayan)
- Luma chequen
- Myrceugenia ovata var. nanophylla
- Myrceugenia exsucca (Petra)
- Amomyrtus luma
- Amomyrtus meli
- Myrteola nummularia (Cranberry Myrtle)
- Myrtus communis (True Myrtle)
- Hexachlamys edulis (Ubajay)
- Myrcianthes pungens (Guabiju)
- Myrcianthes fragrans (Simpson's Stopper, Twinberry)
- Psidium longipetiolatum
Blueberry Relatives
- Vaccinium padifolium (Madeiran Blueberry)
- Agapetes serpens
- Agapetes hosseana
Other
- Leycesteria formosa (Himalayan Honeysuckle)
- Lonicera caerulea (Honeyberry, Haskap)
- Camellia sinensis (Tea)
- Tasmannia lanceolata (Tasmanian Mountain Pepper)
- Billardiera longiflora (Tasmanian Apple Berry)
- Maihuenia poeppigii (really cool cactus)
- Ullucus tuberosus (Ulluco)
- Smallanthus sonchifolius (Yacón)
- Dahlia imperialis (Tree Dahlia)
- Lardizabala biternata (Zabala)
- Lapageria rosea (Chilean Bellflower)
- Elaeagnus latifolia (Indian Olive, Bastar Oleander)
- Zanthoxylum simulans (Sichuan Pepper)
- Zanthoxylum piperitum (Sansho Pepper)
- Zingiber mioga (Japanese Ginger, Myoga)
- Rubus calycinoides (Creeping Raspberry, Emerald Carpet)
- Ilex paraguariensis (Yerba Mate)




Carpathian is another name for the English walnut right? Want to be sure but seems so. Definitely would be interested in butternut too especially if they mature quickly and are of better edibility. The big walnut is totally awesome and I'd surly love to get my hands on that! If anyone can ID pay something pretty decent for some seeds. Either way would buy seeds or seedlings of the Carpathian or butternut too if anyone has them that sees this.

Kaki persimmons would be cool. Totally would buy some seeds of that. Already have a handful of native American persimmons going and had got seeds of Texas persimmons a bit ago that are currently stratifying in my refrigerator now.

Got loquat covered already here. Ate many as a child from neighborhood trees so definitely had to grow it. My largest tree is mature and has smallish fruits but decent flavor. Gonna attempt grafting Big Jim on a few branches right before spring from a member here when the time comes. Wouldn't mind putting Christmas on there too.

Chilean guava is on the radar for sure. Had gotten seeds from a member on here from Germany last year and had several sprouts but the darned chickens ruined that... Another member here has plants and I'll buy one or two here soon for sure as well as some other awesome stuff he has. Wanderlust nursery is his company. If you see this great selection man!

Got plums and cherries covered. Wild forms but will graft on later some good types. Don't mind wild stuff at all though. My palate is not picky and I want production at all above quality in my view of things.

Definitely want almonds, peaches, apricot, etc too. Had many nice seedling peaches going but deer grazed them so much they eventually died due to the reoccurring damage. I'll protect better next time.

Thanks for your reply!

Nice Nursery
I didn't see the Lapageria rosea ( Chilean bellflower or copihue) on the Nursery site
Is it true you can eat the seeds cooked as well or is it just fruits not having much luck online.


D grower You said hops you can make a bitter tea with them as well
(with layers of different flavors in each glass boiling water with the same hops over, & over again)
I have to say Humulus  lupulus var. Neomexicanus 
It is by the western states more , but your more humid I think
(your not to far from Louisiana As I remember)
I think these might not be as bad in the heat though just guessing ,(see below)

Soraschi Ace hop

 is a "PART "Japanese breed hop that prevents Powdery Mildew downy mildew
although beware pure Japanese hops are not recommended
(if they are male with female as they can become invasive)

(copied from here )
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=200006377



I really wasn't going to post until later as I have so many more Just kept getting drawn to this post today.


Look into the natives as well In the Tea family Stewartia ovata (NC) S. malacodendron
 Gordonia lasianthus
&(we have Franklinia )

You may not even drink tea , but the flowers are nice looking

https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/x-gordlinia-grandiflora/

How much land you got Some tiny may apples may look nice (Podophyllum) to protect from animals
you also have a native type , but I looked it doesn't look edible like ours is
Spotty Dotty is a Chinese Hybrid with spotted leaves these do well under a forest , and taste lemon like.
(I may have seeds)

In another post I brought up hullless Pumpkin seeds to roast no hard outer coating (I do not mind that actually)
Vitis Shuttleworthii is a native grape in florida
with these acidic Grapes you can dilute with water, and make juice with sugar added.
speaking of  which
I saw rhubarb growing in New orleans in a raised garden bed
 maybe it could grow there or refrigerate the rhizome .

I may have some seeds of some stuff do you grow Ginkgo (I have a few seeds)
mortum arboretum has a grey leaf looking cultivar
(I like those cultivars that grow all knobby

Dwarf Japanese Maple (mikawa yatsubusa)
that can be trained to look weird as well

Tulip tree is okay in zone 4 to 9 Liriodendron tulipifera

My computers not working right now very good , but I know of some weird cutivars
Varigated Ginkgo is pretty nice just get a normal one they grow so slow ,
 and the tea helps blood flow to the brain (, and helps with men's health I'm sure as well with woman)
be advised may not be good to take if you take aspirine everyday as some people do after stroke I've read..

As I forgot almost The hop people  I brought up
invasive species brewery fort lauderdale is trying to grow hops
(or see  Urban Farming Institute in Oakland Park)

I know that is a lot , but to grow hops in florida you may have to try some of these people
or that japanese breed type Soraschi Ace as I am sure powdery mildew might be bad down that way
you may have to strip the vines of the leaves like they do to grapes to make go dorment (or use Urea large scale)

matthedlund

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #64 on: September 23, 2020, 02:27:05 PM »
Thanks Francis_Eric, I appreciate that! I've gone ahead and added Chilean Bellflower to our website, they're now available in 4 inch pots. I wouldn't recommend eating the seeds in my experience, but I'm sure they're not toxic. The fruit is supposedly quite good, although I haven't tried it myself.

Thanks for the shoutout D-Grower!  If anyone's curious about the nursery, the website is www.wanderlustnursery.com.  We'll be adding all sorts of few new offerings in March, so check us out.  In addition to what I've seen posted here so far, here are some other fun plants we grow in zone 8b:

Figs
- Ficus carica (Common Fig, many varieties)
- Ficus johannis ssp. Afghanistanica (Afghan Fig)
- Ficus palmata (Punjab Fig)
Wineberries
- Aristotelia chilensis (Chilean Wineberry, Maqui)
- Aristotelia serrata (Mountain Wineberry)
Palms
- Allagoptera arenaria (Seashore Palm)
- Parajubaea torralyi (Bolivian Mountain Coconut)
Myrtaceae
- Luma apiculata (Luma, Arrayan)
- Luma chequen
- Myrceugenia ovata var. nanophylla
- Myrceugenia exsucca (Petra)
- Amomyrtus luma
- Amomyrtus meli
- Myrteola nummularia (Cranberry Myrtle)
- Myrtus communis (True Myrtle)
- Hexachlamys edulis (Ubajay)
- Myrcianthes pungens (Guabiju)
- Myrcianthes fragrans (Simpson's Stopper, Twinberry)
- Psidium longipetiolatum
Blueberry Relatives
- Vaccinium padifolium (Madeiran Blueberry)
- Agapetes serpens
- Agapetes hosseana
Other
- Leycesteria formosa (Himalayan Honeysuckle)
- Lonicera caerulea (Honeyberry, Haskap)
- Camellia sinensis (Tea)
- Tasmannia lanceolata (Tasmanian Mountain Pepper)
- Billardiera longiflora (Tasmanian Apple Berry)
- Maihuenia poeppigii (really cool cactus)
- Ullucus tuberosus (Ulluco)
- Smallanthus sonchifolius (Yacón)
- Dahlia imperialis (Tree Dahlia)
- Lardizabala biternata (Zabala)
- Lapageria rosea (Chilean Bellflower)
- Elaeagnus latifolia (Indian Olive, Bastar Oleander)
- Zanthoxylum simulans (Sichuan Pepper)
- Zanthoxylum piperitum (Sansho Pepper)
- Zingiber mioga (Japanese Ginger, Myoga)
- Rubus calycinoides (Creeping Raspberry, Emerald Carpet)
- Ilex paraguariensis (Yerba Mate)




Carpathian is another name for the English walnut right? Want to be sure but seems so. Definitely would be interested in butternut too especially if they mature quickly and are of better edibility. The big walnut is totally awesome and I'd surly love to get my hands on that! If anyone can ID pay something pretty decent for some seeds. Either way would buy seeds or seedlings of the Carpathian or butternut too if anyone has them that sees this.

Kaki persimmons would be cool. Totally would buy some seeds of that. Already have a handful of native American persimmons going and had got seeds of Texas persimmons a bit ago that are currently stratifying in my refrigerator now.

Got loquat covered already here. Ate many as a child from neighborhood trees so definitely had to grow it. My largest tree is mature and has smallish fruits but decent flavor. Gonna attempt grafting Big Jim on a few branches right before spring from a member here when the time comes. Wouldn't mind putting Christmas on there too.

Chilean guava is on the radar for sure. Had gotten seeds from a member on here from Germany last year and had several sprouts but the darned chickens ruined that... Another member here has plants and I'll buy one or two here soon for sure as well as some other awesome stuff he has. Wanderlust nursery is his company. If you see this great selection man!

Got plums and cherries covered. Wild forms but will graft on later some good types. Don't mind wild stuff at all though. My palate is not picky and I want production at all above quality in my view of things.

Definitely want almonds, peaches, apricot, etc too. Had many nice seedling peaches going but deer grazed them so much they eventually died due to the reoccurring damage. I'll protect better next time.

Thanks for your reply!

Nice Nursery
I didn't see the Lapageria rosea ( Chilean bellflower or copihue) on the Nursery site
Is it true you can eat the seeds cooked as well or is it just fruits not having much luck online.


D grower You said hops you can make a bitter tea with them as well
(with layers of different flavors in each glass boiling water with the same hops over, & over again)
I have to say Humulus  lupulus var. Neomexicanus 
It is by the western states more , but your more humid I think
(your not to far from Louisiana As I remember)
I think these might not be as bad in the heat though just guessing ,(see below)

Soraschi Ace hop

 is a "PART "Japanese breed hop that prevents Powdery Mildew downy mildew
although beware pure Japanese hops are not recommended
(if they are male with female as they can become invasive)

(copied from here )
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=200006377



I really wasn't going to post until later as I have so many more Just kept getting drawn to this post today.


Look into the natives as well In the Tea family Stewartia ovata (NC) S. malacodendron
 Gordonia lasianthus
&(we have Franklinia )

You may not even drink tea , but the flowers are nice looking

https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/x-gordlinia-grandiflora/

How much land you got Some tiny may apples may look nice (Podophyllum) to protect from animals
you also have a native type , but I looked it doesn't look edible like ours is
Spotty Dotty is a Chinese Hybrid with spotted leaves these do well under a forest , and taste lemon like.
(I may have seeds)

In another post I brought up hullless Pumpkin seeds to roast no hard outer coating (I do not mind that actually)
Vitis Shuttleworthii is a native grape in florida
with these acidic Grapes you can dilute with water, and make juice with sugar added.
speaking of  which
I saw rhubarb growing in New orleans in a raised garden bed
 maybe it could grow there or refrigerate the rhizome .

I may have some seeds of some stuff do you grow Ginkgo (I have a few seeds)
mortum arboretum has a grey leaf looking cultivar
(I like those cultivars that grow all knobby

Dwarf Japanese Maple (mikawa yatsubusa)
that can be trained to look weird as well

Tulip tree is okay in zone 4 to 9 Liriodendron tulipifera

My computers not working right now very good , but I know of some weird cutivars
Varigated Ginkgo is pretty nice just get a normal one they grow so slow ,
 and the tea helps blood flow to the brain (, and helps with men's health I'm sure as well with woman)
be advised may not be good to take if you take aspirine everyday as some people do after stroke I've read..

As I forgot almost The hop people  I brought up
invasive species brewery fort lauderdale is trying to grow hops
(or see  Urban Farming Institute in Oakland Park)

I know that is a lot , but to grow hops in florida you may have to try some of these people
or that japanese breed type Soraschi Ace as I am sure powdery mildew might be bad down that way
you may have to strip the vines of the leaves like they do to grapes to make go dorment (or use Urea large scale)

Giannhs

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Re: Odd unusually seen fruits hardy to zone 8
« Reply #65 on: September 25, 2020, 10:53:43 AM »
this would be a great thread if places selling and sending all these were shown. Majority of the names of plants quoted here are unknown to me. Thanks for the ASHITABA anyway, i had never heard of it and seems to be worth to search for a place to buy it.
By the way, have a look to https://jurassicplants.co.uk/pages/our-story

 

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