Author Topic: Benefits of deep contianers?  (Read 2027 times)

NewGen

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Benefits of deep contianers?
« on: October 07, 2015, 08:18:44 PM »
Any of you guys use them? Where did you buy them from? I'm thinking that those plants with long taproot can benefit from the extra depth.
Thanks,

fyliu

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Re: Benefits of deep contianers?
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2015, 10:08:27 PM »
search for "tree pots" on the web

They still seem expensive to me. Tell me if you find one that's a good deal and I'll get some too.

Tropicaliste

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Re: Benefits of deep contianers?
« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2015, 10:20:06 PM »
Microkote, it terminates the taproot, no need for a long pot. That said, I recommend the treepots too, if you don't want microkote. They aren't very steady though.

barath

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Re: Benefits of deep contianers?
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2015, 02:09:50 AM »
One cheap solution I've seen Tom A. use for his white sapotes, which like to have lots of room, is stack two 1/2 gallon cardboard rectangular milk / beverage containers on top of each other (taped in some way) and use that as a deep pot.  It's about as deep as many of the tree pots, stable (because of the flat bottom), and free.  I've also tried something similar by cutting the bottom off of a #1 nursery pot and stacking it, but it's not nearly as stable.

OCchris

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Re: Benefits of deep contianers?
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2015, 02:22:16 AM »
Stuewe & Sons (stuewe.com) has all the deep pots you desire -up to about 3gal or so (i think). I have done some bartering to get some used, deep 3 gallon pots at various L.A nurseries. Those deep pots are hard to find around here. Chris

fyliu

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Re: Benefits of deep contianers?
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2015, 02:25:48 AM »
Oh yeah, white sapote develops its taproot really early. I dug some out before and all the taproots were damaged and there weren't much side roots.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Benefits of deep contianers?
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2015, 08:43:52 AM »
I've used Stuewe treepots, some treated with Griffin's Spin-Out paint (copper hydroxide) concentrating the paint at the bottom of the pot.  My method of madness was mainly aimed at oak seedlings which have a very invasive taproot.  Treepots are great but being they're tall and top heavy they require support especially in any kind of wind.

Or you can make your own like I do with RootBuilder plastic material.

simon_grow

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Re: Benefits of deep contianers?
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2015, 05:15:51 PM »
One cheap solution I've seen Tom A. use for his white sapotes, which like to have lots of room, is stack two 1/2 gallon cardboard rectangular milk / beverage containers on top of each other (taped in some way) and use that as a deep pot.  It's about as deep as many of the tree pots, stable (because of the flat bottom), and free.  I've also tried something similar by cutting the bottom off of a #1 nursery pot and stacking it, but it's not nearly as stable.

That's awesome! I love the idea of re purposing something and it's also cheap.

Simon

 

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