Author Topic: grafting guava  (Read 779 times)

BobHawks

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grafting guava
« on: July 08, 2022, 02:01:11 PM »
Hi
we have 3 guava trees.  white turnbull, red malaysian,  tropical pink.  All are about 8ft tall.  I have been trying to graft to the largest,  white turnbull with zero success.  Interested in saving space and have all 3 on 1 trunk.  Anyone have a graft method that works?
Thanks Bob

Malhar

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2022, 08:12:57 PM »
Guava has been the most difficult fruit to graft for me as well. Among the many grafts I have attempted, I had success with three grafts which were all bark grafts with long (~2 inch) contact area between scion and root stock. I had no luck with cleft grafts.

ph8542

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2022, 08:42:02 PM »
Guava is difficult to graft.  I have a success rate of 20% using semi-hard woods with cleft technique.

Seanny

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2022, 08:44:18 PM »
Easiest is to dig up those 2 trees then put them in pots.
Move them next to tree you want to keep.
Do approach grafts.
Graft very early in the morning when wind is low and humidity is high.



brian

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2022, 10:11:15 PM »
I've noticed that my guava puts out a ton of root suckers.  Would it be viable to cut one off as a clone?

JCorte

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2022, 10:54:43 PM »
There is another thread with links to videos on grafting guavas.

https://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=45700.0

Janet

kh0110

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2022, 12:35:18 AM »
I've noticed that my guava puts out a ton of root suckers.  Would it be viable to cut one off as a clone?

It's a bit off-topic but I believe root suckers are considered to be clones of the tree.
Thera

sc4001992

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2022, 12:43:40 AM »
unless they are coming from below the graft union (if it's a grafted one like the ones I see from box stores).

kh0110

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2022, 01:02:01 AM »
unless they are coming from below the graft union (if it's a grafted one like the ones I see from box stores).

That would not be a root sucker which is a sucker that rises from a root above or near the surface. Guava is known to do this a lot.
Thera

Plantinyum

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2022, 02:07:44 AM »
I did several ,around 8 grafts in two styles- clefts and barks. I did them over winter with humidity domes on top of the grafts. I removed them gradually when i saw new growth on the ones that took. I had 3 that were succesfull ,all of which were clefts, again with long cuts and as much as possible contact area between the rootstock and the scion.
I think i would have a better succes now in summer, with all the humidity and warmth and summer in general  haha 😄 that said the grafting was done on potted plants inside home over winter = not a good time or place to do it at all...

seng

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2022, 02:31:20 AM »
It is hard to graft because the calus  takes a long time to form.  My successes were using approached graft.  Early this year, I grafterd 2 red seedless diamond and two seedless crystall.  All took, after 4 months.  The two diamond and one crystal died in the pots during the heat wave a few weeks ago.  The remaining one seem to recover from the heat wave.  I will graft again, once the mother trees get some more branches.

greenerpasteur

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #11 on: July 09, 2022, 02:18:07 PM »
It is hard to graft because the calus  takes a long time to form.  My successes were using approached graft.  Early this year, I grafterd 2 red seedless diamond and two seedless crystall.  All took, after 4 months.  The two diamond and one crystal died in the pots during the heat wave a few weeks ago.  The remaining one seem to recover from the heat wave.  I will graft again, once the mother trees get some more branches.

4 months is a long time for approach graft!

I've did a couple approach grafts. It's on going 2 months. After cutting the graft, I'll cover it from full sun.

I got Thai seedless guava, Taiwan seedless guava, Taiwan ruby seedless guava (ruby crystal) and Thai seedless guava. approaching graft right now.

BobHawks

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #12 on: July 09, 2022, 09:40:43 PM »
Seanny
your approach graft looks to have 2 different diameter branches contacting each other??  am i seeing that right?
shouldn't they be the same size so the cambien matches up

brian

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #13 on: July 09, 2022, 09:55:09 PM »
My suggestion about root suckers sort of depends on the parent tree being an air layer (or seedling I guess), but if grafting is hard, air-layering is possible, and root-suckers can be propagated easily it seems like a reasonable alternative to grafting or rooting.

Seanny

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #14 on: July 10, 2022, 01:55:42 AM »
Seanny
your approach graft looks to have 2 different diameter branches contacting each other??  am i seeing that right?
shouldn't they be the same size so the cambien matches up

Bob,

You can think of an approach graft as a bark graft, without cutting the scion off the donor.
Peel a strip of bark off the rootstock.
Slice a veneer of bark off the scion.
Wrap them.

Rootstock can be much bigger than scion.
No need to remove wood.
No need to line up.

If you do the textbook way, you need to remove wood.
So you have to line up the cambium.

I do approach a little differently.
I remove a ring of bark on the scion, right below the part for where I would graft.
I scrape off the cambium, like doing an air-layering.
I peel a strip of bark off each rootstock and each scion.
I wrap them.
Below the graft is the wood of the scion, without bark.
All the hormones from the scion goes into healing the graft instead of going down to the donor roots.




I forgot to remove ring of bark at graft time.
So I had to remove it later, lower than where I liked.

« Last Edit: July 10, 2022, 02:05:17 AM by Seanny »

seng

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #15 on: July 14, 2022, 01:46:49 AM »
Seanny, I like your approach of not trying to match the cambium layer.  If the  rootstock and scion are not vertically paralelled, so that they 'x' in almost vertical position, the crossing cambium areas are stretched and guarranteed.  No wonder you have so high success rate on this method.

I think this technique will have a good success rate on top work grafting as well.

Thanks.

greenerpasteur

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #16 on: July 15, 2022, 03:56:55 PM »
Seanny, I like your approach of not trying to match the cambium layer.  If the  rootstock and scion are not vertically paralelled, so that they 'x' in almost vertical position, the crossing cambium areas are stretched and guarranteed.  No wonder you have so high success rate on this method.

I think this technique will have a good success rate on top work grafting as well.

Thanks.

I also do the same method as Seanny. I'm doing multiple approach graft to the bark of a bigger roostock. I'm totally top works all of my guava. You can even graft in the middle of the trunk if you want.

BobHawks

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Re: grafting guava
« Reply #17 on: July 20, 2022, 09:36:21 PM »
Seanny
thanks,  trying the approach method now

 

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