Author Topic: 6 best ballanced for yield, warming climate, disease resistance, Mangos  (Read 1180 times)

EddieF

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South FL, cleared approx 50x60 area, 35 yards of topsoil was needed to level, surrounding pepper trees mostly trimmed to let sunshine in, water lines run.

What do ya'll recommend?  I like sweet, semi dwarf or topping of standard trees no problem.
I'm thinking a couple warmer climate varieties might be wise?

Ed

JulianoGS

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Go with pickering mango
Be very careful and mindful of what you sow, for whatever a man sows, that he will also reap.

EddieF

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Pickering- noted, thank you.
Carrie i plan on.
Edward, Big Jim, Dwarf Hawaiian, Coconut Cream sound good?
Anthracnose fighting capability would be nice.
Tree size not a concern.  Worry about it in 15 yrs when i get hit in head by fruit.

« Last Edit: May 14, 2020, 06:12:01 AM by EddieF »

MostGrowersFarm

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Hi Ed,

If you are looking for a semi-dwarf, sweet mango that is resistant to anthracnose and bacterial black spot, I recommend an Angie.

- Alex

Johnny Redland

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Hi Ed,

If you are looking for a semi-dwarf, sweet mango that is resistant to anthracnose and bacterial black spot, I recommend an Angie.

- Alex

I highly advise against this. Angie is notorious for fungal and disease problems

MostGrowersFarm

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My Angie tree is still small so I got the disease resistant info from Alex's description from Tropical Acres as well as searching this forum. Haven't heard of anybody having a horrible time with the tree in terms of diseases. Maybe you are thinking of another dwarf, ice cream, which is known to have issues with disease/fungus.

roblack

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Consider throwing in a couple of Glenns. Not the best tasting mango, but good to sometimes very good. Nice production, fruit are usually clean, tree is easy to control. Of all my mangoes and other trees, Glenn feeds us the most by far.

mangokothiyan

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Honey Kiss. Honey Kiss, Honey Kiss  :) :)

Tommyng

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Consider throwing in a couple of Glenns. Not the best tasting mango, but good to sometimes very good. Nice production, fruit are usually clean, tree is easy to control. Of all my mangoes and other trees, Glenn feeds us the most by far.

I concur. Itís even a favorite of some here. Itís always reliable. Itís not my favorite but I enjoy eating it.
Donít rush, take time and enjoy life and food.

EddieF

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Thanks for input so far.
Pickering, Carrie, Glenn, Honey kiss all sound good.
Tree size really isn't issue, i'd rather have quick large growing trees if that's what it takes to enjoy them sooner.  Of course less maintenance is also nice.
Try fruit before you buy plant's great advice but unless i can taste the day i buy, it won't happen.
I have a 20yr old tree & it grows top utility pole wire if u let it (don't ask how i know lol) but i now keep it 12' or so.  No idea what type, has fiber, very orange inside, sweetest i ever had.  Sticky lips after washing face heh.  I call it the sticky test.
Fiber doesn't bother me if taste is there.

 

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