Author Topic: Best Chewing Sugarcane  (Read 381 times)

Rispa

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Best Chewing Sugarcane
« on: November 22, 2022, 03:46:24 AM »
I only plan to chew it, so I want a couple of the best varieties. I picked up Hilo Buddha and Vietnamese Black so far. I also bought a stick of the one pictured and wonder if it's the same as the one I bought as Vietnamese Black. It sure looks the same. I was also eyeballing blue ribbon, but not sure if it's the same as purple ribbon and someone just got cookie names confused.

Anyone have experience with several types and can give input?

Rispa

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Re: Best Chewing Sugarcane
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2022, 03:47:43 AM »



Galatians522

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Re: Best Chewing Sugarcane
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2022, 10:15:28 AM »
One of my favorites for chewing is the Home Green. It is the preferd kind for chewing among Hispanics. The fibers are almost as soft as the Asian Black that I grow, but they stick together better, and the bottom of the cane does not dry out as fast. Jamaicans prefer the Jamaican Striped cane (which they call Red Stripe). They say it is the best, but I have not had the pleasure of trying it.

Regarding Blue Ribbon cane, I have eaten it but I have not grown it. I had the same question as you, and here is what I concluded from my research. It appears to be the same or very similar to the Lousianna Purple (aka Georgia Red, Florida Red, Home Purple) that I grow. There is a lot of confusion about exact cane identification due to several reasons. First, cane can be very difficult to properly ID and it takes more than just the stalk in most cases. Next, cane has been grown over such a wide range for so long that the same varieties have developed many regional names (and in some cases minor mutations). Adding to the confusion is the fact that all of the striped (ribbon) canes are merely color variants of a solid color type (similar to varigation). For example, Purple Ribbon is the striped version of Lousianna Purple. Similar to varigated plants, the solid color reversion tends to be  a slightly stronger grower and if special care is not taken will out grow and replace the striped kind over time (especially under adverse conditions). However, the variety won't be lost forever because it can revert back and pop up in a solid color stand. That made everything just as clear as mud, I am sure.

Galatians522

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Re: Best Chewing Sugarcane
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2022, 10:36:16 AM »
Blue Ribbon was a nice chewing cane in my experience, by the way.

Rispa

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Re: Best Chewing Sugarcane
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2022, 01:15:41 AM »
One of my favorites for chewing is the Home Green. It is the preferd kind for chewing among Hispanics. The fibers are almost as soft as the Asian Black that I grow, but they stick together better, and the bottom of the cane does not dry out as fast. Jamaicans prefer the Jamaican Striped cane (which they call Red Stripe). They say it is the best, but I have not had the pleasure of trying it.

Regarding Blue Ribbon cane, I have eaten it but I have not grown it. I had the same question as you, and here is what I concluded from my research. It appears to be the same or very similar to the Lousianna Purple (aka Georgia Red, Florida Red, Home Purple) that I grow. There is a lot of confusion about exact cane identification due to several reasons. First, cane can be very difficult to properly ID and it takes more than just the stalk in most cases. Next, cane has been grown over such a wide range for so long that the same varieties have developed many regional names (and in some cases minor mutations). Adding to the confusion is the fact that all of the striped (ribbon) canes are merely color variants of a solid color type (similar to varigation). For example, Purple Ribbon is the striped version of Lousianna Purple. Similar to varigated plants, the solid color reversion tends to be  a slightly stronger grower and if special care is not taken will out grow and replace the striped kind over time (especially under adverse conditions). However, the variety won't be lost forever because it can revert back and pop up in a solid color stand. That made everything just as clear as mud, I am sure.

This was so incredibly helpful. You found out more ran I was able to. Thank you so much. I am just shooting for a few great varieties to grow. Nothing like collecting a bunch of them or anything like that. I really appreciate the help.

 

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