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Messages - Aiptasia904

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1
I commented on the video in the hopes of a raffle for seeds/fruits. Also, you can use a little smear of petroleum jelly around the trunks of some of your fruit trees to keep the ants from herding aphids and scale onto them. If you smear a thick 3-4" ring of the goo around the trunks the bugs get hung up in it and can't get up and into the tree. There's also some commercial ant jelly out there with a pesticide in it that does the same thing. Old trick I learned from my Dad on apple trees. When we had a lot of honey stores in my workshop for the meadery, I used a perimeter bait called Maxforce Complete by Bayer that had both sweet baits and protein baits in it for ants. They pick up the baits, take them back to the hive and toss the poison into the communal fungal feed pile and it will wipe out the whole ant hive. Very targeted pesticide, non-systemic. Works for roaches and grasshoppers or any opportunistic feeding ground insects. It's expensive but it works like a charm for knocking back those bull ants, sugar ants, carpenter and fire ants, you name it.

2
Kumquats, Everglades Tomatoes, Yardlong Beans. Peppers. The usual.  ;D

3
PM'd.

4
Thanks Brad. I missed to mention that these are in ground seedlings.

My rainwater is already at 176ppm which is 0.176g/L.

I know you meant 200ppm for the total but Let's assume 200ppm of added salts. 200ppm = 0.2g/L.

If I follow that rate throughout the growing season I would end up with just 0.2*10*26 = 52g about 10 folds less than UF recommended rate?

Your rainwater is 176 ppm tds? What are you adding to it? Rainwater is better than distilled and should be 0 ppm tds. If you're showing a tds reading with sequestered rainwater make sure you're calibrating your TDS meter.

Use what you have as far as fertilizers you're using, but a lot of these issues can be solved by using organic solid fertilizers such as Espoma's chicken poop based fertilizers. They make a mango mix and it will continue to dissolve and feed your mangoes with every rainfall and watering when used as directed as a top dressing. No math needed.

Newly sprouted seedlings won't need any fertilizer at all for the first two months if you're using a good quality potting/sprouting mix. You're correct in using about half the amount of the fertilizer you are using when you fertilize. I wouldn't worry so much about feeding fertilizer with every watering. You should be feeding your mango seedlings about every month and a half to two months during the season once they've depleted available nutrients from the seeds themselves and in their first soil and not at all in the winter. Let rainwater do your soil flushing.

5
There's something more humble about asking for permission to use a photo than outright stealing it without permission though. Even if you can't find the image you want on pixabay for free. This kind of scamming is rampant in the groups on facebook. People stealing pictures, demanding payments by zelle or venmo and just disappearing.

6
Not really necessary. It's more beneficial for you to add worm castings/compost from a vermicomposter to your container and greenhouse gardening than the worms themselves. I have a hard time keeping armadillos out of my vermicomposter and have to use a tightening ratchet strap over the lid and the base to keep those worm scavenging buggers out of my worm bin.

7
Spread a tarp on the ground and then dig out your topsoil and put it on the tarp. Just dig around the plants trying not to disturb them too much but in a nice wide, deep bowl shape and put the dirt on the tarp. Mix your amendments on the tarp and then shovel it back into place. Walk around it to tamp it in good and then water well. You can sub vermiculite or perlite for sand. If you have sandy soil it might not be necessary. But, if it has a lot of clay in it yeah you want to increase the drainage.

8
Love the variegated pattern. What Eugenia is it?

9

The other possibility is it was damaged in transit. Like broken.


Wind damage from thrashing around in the back of my truck severely damaged an apple tree of mine once. I should've laid it down flat in the truck bed. I put it in the ground and it slowly dropped all of it's leaves on me.

This resembles transplant shock to me. You have to water plants pretty hard and sometimes protect them from sunlight if they haven't been hardened off sufficiently. 

10
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Guava dropped fruit
« on: August 30, 2022, 03:20:02 PM »
I might consider topping that central stalk to the first node and let it branch out so that it isn't so tall and lanky. Typically, I prune fruit trees in the winter or early spring. I trim off any branches that are crossing, low sucker branches especially ones below a graft line and if there are Y shaped branches, trim off the inner portion of the Y so that it's always growing upwards and outwards. This will open up the fruit tree in the center and allow more air exchange and sunlight to penetrate the center of the tree. Try to prune branches off as flush with the trunks as you can. Also remove any dried out dead branches and old leaves.

11
Citrus General Discussion / Re: My Pomelo
« on: August 30, 2022, 07:33:39 AM »
Consistent watering. The majority of the time I've had fruits split like that are after periods of heavy watering/rain after a drought.

12
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Guava dropped fruit
« on: August 30, 2022, 07:30:51 AM »
It's too young to support fruit to maturity. Many different kinds of fruit trees will self-regulate. Citrus and avocados are famous for it.

13
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Jaboticaba bonsai?
« on: August 29, 2022, 11:48:55 PM »
I enjoy the videos Carlos does - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xses4W24vuQ (lots of nice examples here)

another one - pruning etc, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D3lZB25kEL0
another one, updates - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQXKqz0_ARU

He does bonsais of many Brazilian fruit trees, many of them fruiting/flowering as bonsai too. You can use youtube caption auto-translate to better understand what is going on.

I have been reading about bonsai for sometime now and have experimented around w/it. The main thing I'd say is that if you want your tree to fruit without waiting 30 years you want it to be at maturity before you begin the bonsai process. For pre bonsai specimen you don't want to just throw them directly into bonsai pots, while your sabara is in a decently deeper bowl, I'd recommend growing out a red to maturity before beginning the bonsai process on it - that is, if you want fruits.

The info isn't too hard to find, you just need to make queries in Portuguese and then use translation tools.

Wow. I watched the videos and bookmarked his youtube channel. Great information on working with both mature jaboticaba bonsai trees and pre-bonsai. Mine are all definitely in the pre-bonsai stage. I would say I have about two years growth on both the Sabara and the red hybrids and I have a few newer saplings (esalq red) and some others to work with.

It's interesting that he's using what looks like an organic acadama soil mixture. I've used mineral only acadama on some of my rare cactus plants but his mix looks like what you'd find in a standard bonsai acadama mix with organics. Right now mine are in black gold organic potting mix but i'll switch them over to a similar mix to what he's using when I re-pot them.

I'm going to go ahead and let them go another season in their current pots. I think two years in-between re-potting should be sufficient. It's good to know that he's confirmed my thoughts on when to prune them back (early spring) and the methods he's using to prune them are what I have in mind, which is to trim off the older leaves and any crossing branches.. His radical pruning of the older trees was both fascinating to watch and a bit cringe because I know what a tree that size would cost me here in the USA. He just takes a $500 tree and assertively chops it to practically knobs, grinds down the nubs of his branch cutting with a dremel tool, slaps a little tree wound salve on the cuts and the trees rebound without any problem whatsoever.

As to fruiting ones vs. non-fruiting, yes I would like it to fruit so I guess I won't be touching the roots until it's matured in each instance. I have an unconfirmed theory though that the more root restricted/root bound the jaboticabas get, the faster they will fruit. I know the red hybrids will begin to flower and fruit at 3-4 years maturity and I know it takes eight to twelve years for the Sabara, but perhaps having it in the restricted containers will encourage the Sabara to flower and fruit earlier. Or maybe not. I guess i'll find out in due time.

This is great info. Thanks for posting the links Socalbalcony2. :)

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Jaboticaba bonsai?
« on: August 29, 2022, 11:40:49 PM »
I enjoy the videos Carlos does - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xses4W24vuQ (lots of nice examples here)

another one - pruning etc, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D3lZB25kEL0
another one, updates - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQXKqz0_ARU

He does bonsais of many Brazilian fruit trees, many of them fruiting/flowering as bonsai too. You can use youtube caption auto-translate to better understand what is going on.

I have been reading about bonsai for sometime now and have experimented around w/it. The main thing I'd say is that if you want your tree to fruit without waiting 30 years you want it to be at maturity before you begin the bonsai process. For pre bonsai specimen you don't want to just throw them directly into bonsai pots, while your sabara is in a decently deeper bowl, I'd recommend growing out a red to maturity before beginning the bonsai process on it - that is, if you want fruits.

The info isn't too hard to find, you just need to make queries in Portuguese and then use translation tools.

Wow. I watched the videos and bookmarked his youtube channel. Great information on working with both mature jaboticaba bonsai trees and pre-bonsai. Mine are all definitely in the pre-bonsai stage. I would say I have about two years growth on both the Sabara and the red hybrids and I have a few newer saplings (esalq red) and some others to work with.

It's interesting that he's using what looks like an organic acadama soil mixture. I've used mineral only acadama on some of my rare cactus plants but his mix looks like what you'd find in a standard bonsai acadama mix with organics. Right now mine are in black gold organic potting mix but i'll switch them over to a similar mix to what he's using when I re-pot them.

I'm going to go ahead and let them go another season in their current pots. I think two years in-between re-potting should be sufficient. It's good to know that he's confirmed my thoughts on when to prune them back (early spring) and the methods he's using to prune them are what I have in mind, which is to trim off the older leaves and any crossing branches.. His radical pruning of the older trees was both fascinating to watch and a bit cringe because I know what a tree that size would cost me here in the USA. He just takes a $500 tree and chops it to practically knobs of nothing, grinds down the nubs of his branch cutting with a dremel tool and the trees rebound without any problem whatsoever.

As to fruiting ones vs. non-fruiting, yes I would like it to fruit so I guess I won't be touching the roots until it's matured in each instance. I have an unconfirmed theory though that the more root restricted/root bound the jaboticabas get, the faster they will fruit. I know the red hybrids will begin to flower and fruit at 3-4 years maturity and I know it takes eight to twelve years for the Sabara, but perhaps having it in the restricted containers will encourage the Sabara to flower and fruit earlier. Or maybe not. I guess i'll find out in due time.

This is great info. Thanks for posting the links Socalbalcony2. :)

15
I used an app called Picture This to try to identify your mystery plants and it said
1. Java plum
2. yellow bells

I am interested in knowing how accurate these "AI powered" apps are.

Pretty close in this case but I don't trust them enough to be 100% accurate yet.

16
We could presume the garcinia sp to be lemon drop (garcinia brasiliensis). The leaves are too fat to be achacha. I'd be shocked if you had something else.
and the spondias sp to be june plum.

#1 Garcinia sp.
#2 Spondias sp.

On the nose, guys. I had planted some Lemon Drop Mangosteen and some June plum seeds in soil in peat cups a few months back so in my butchered handwriting that translated to "JD Mensa" when it should be "LD Mango" for Lemon Drop Mangosteen. I got the superior form  of fruits and eventual post-consumption seeds from Adam at Flying Fox Fruits and it's the only one to have sprouted up for me so far. The June Plums were found at a local farmer's market and I'd forgotten that I'd planted a few seedlings.

Thanks for the help!

17
Bump because of new photos to help.

18
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Jaboticaba bonsai?
« on: August 29, 2022, 01:39:55 PM »
Sounds like you are on the right track!

Would love to see some pics; now, and as you progress.

I did a read up on another pruning recommendation on Jaboticaba bonsai. They recommended re-potting in early spring every two years so I might just wait before up potting mine. Here's a few pics.

Sabara


Red Hybrids


Red Hybrid next to pepper plants


Three Month old rooting cuttings

19
Citrus General Discussion / Re: Propper tree for potted Citrus
« on: August 29, 2022, 01:26:10 PM »
Meyer lemons don't grow true from seed. You'll need to buy a grafted meyer lemon tree to successfully grow a good one in a big pot.

Kumquats are also great in pots.

20
Yeah the length of time to mature is a big factor with citrus. So that is a huge factor besides variation. I would grow pecans, peaches etc from seed purely because they charge way too much for a tree. Even if the seed had slightly less desirable traits it's better than paying $100 for a stick.

With citrus you may be referring to a ban on selling citrus. All the stuff sold has been treated for disease and is clean. Also illigal to import or export citrus from the state but kind of pointless nothing has stopped the spread of disease.

I'd like some dwarf Meyer seeds. Those sound interesting. Seeds can be imported.

Time to maturity is the only factor that would preclude me from raising sweet citrus from seed. That, or if they're some of the varieties i've mentioned that indeed do not grow true from seed.

As to the illegality of non-nursery propagated citrus trees, here's the 2022 Florida Statutes definition that makes it illegal.

"581.1843 (2) Effective January 1, 2007, it is unlawful for any person to propagate for sale or movement any citrus nursery stock that was not propagated or grown on a site and within a protective structure approved by the department and that is not at least 1 mile away from commercial citrus groves. A citrus nursery registered with the department prior to April 1, 2006, shall not be required to comply with the 1-mile setback from commercial citrus groves while continuously operating at the same location for which it was registered. However, the nursery shall be required to propagate citrus within a protective structure approved by the department. Effective January 1, 2008, it shall be unlawful to distribute any citrus nursery stock that was not produced in a protective structure approved by the department."

In other words, if you're propagating your citrus at home or at a non-inspected and approved facility with the structures in place to protect the stock, it's actually illegal.

As to growing true from seed, a quote from Dr. Carl Campbell (U.F.) from an interview in 1983: " I checked with Dr. Carl Campbell at the University of Florida Extension research center. Carl has given me many in-depth, insightful answers to tropical fruit questions sent by several of our readers. He said that a great number of citrus trees will come true from seed. There is a way you can tell by examining a few seeds from the tree. Peel off the outer and inner seed coat. If the seed is polyembryonic, i.e. has many embryos, it will come true. I asked what it would look like if it were polyembryonic. Carl said that the various embryos would be convoluted upon each other. If it is mono-embryonic there will be one embryo with two distinct cotyledons. Almost any sweet orange will come true from seed, as well as key limes, grapefruit, tangerine and tangelo. Two varieties that will not come true from seed are temple and pomelo."

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Blueberries in warmer climates
« on: August 29, 2022, 01:00:11 PM »
We have a lot of blueberry farms around us in zone 9b/9a in Central and North Florida. Miller Blueberry Farm in Interlachen, FL is about an hour drive south of us. They plant their blueberries in elevated rows of mixed organic and sandy loamy soil at about five foot distance between the plants and use a rain sequestering pond and pumps to sprinklers for irrigation. The key here in the heat is to keep them watered about two to three times a week with a minimum of five gallons of water each watering per plant if we haven't gotten 1" of rain lately. That usually means running a sprinkler setup for 30-40 minutes. The soil pH needs to be on the acidic side from 5.0 to 6.0 with 5.5 being the sweet spot, so use a lot of organics. They do fine in full sun in rows or containers either is fine and feed them organic fertilizers every two months. Fish emulsion, kelp meal and chicken poop are excellent choices.

The biggest problems you'll have are birds and other critters raiding the bushes for berries. It's funny. at Miller's farm they have motion detection air cannons all over the orchards that will fire whenever they sense movement which scares the crap out of birds and other varmints. U-pick is always hilarious as it sounds like a Vietnam flashback with the air cannons going off while you pick.

22
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Blueberries in warmer climates
« on: August 29, 2022, 12:59:06 PM »
We have a lot of blueberry farms around us in zone 9b/9a in Central and North Florida. Miller Blueberry Farm in Interlachen, FL is about an hour drive south of us. They plant their blueberries in elevated rows of mixed organic and sandy loamy soil at about five foot distance between the plants and use a rain sequestering pond for irrigation. The key here in the heat is to keep them watered about two to three times a week with a minimum of five gallons of water each watering per plant if we haven't gotten 1" of rain lately. That usually means running a sprinkler setup for 30-40 minutes. The soil pH needs to be on the acidic side from 5.0 to 6.0 with 5.5 being the sweet spot, so use a lot of organics. They do fine in full sun in rows or containers either is fine and feed them organic fertilizers every two months. Fish emulsion, kelp meal and chicken poop are excellent choices.

The biggest problems you'll have are birds and other critters raiding the bushes for berries. It's funny. at Miller's farm they have motion detection air cannons all over the orchards that will fire whenever they sense movement which scares the crap out of birds and other varmints. U-pick is always hilarious as it sounds like a Vietnam flashback with the air cannons going off while you pick.

23
You can always install an additional water heater in your home and use circulation pumps to drive the heated water to your greenhouse and back. If what i'm reading is right, you want to connect your heating system in your greenhouse to the main house water heating system. I have an electric instant on water heater in my workshop that's 16 gauge and can heat the water to 140f. (60c) in about ten seconds. That's about the max heat i've been able to find in the electric ones but the gas ones designed for commercial spaces can heat a bit hotter if you need it near boiling.

I would think it will come down to either hot water or steam radiator designs. Do you need the humidity that a steam radiator provides? Then I would go with steam. Otherwise, hot water will be adequate. They both look about the same and come in free standing and wall mount styles.

I have also seen space heaters that attach to the top of propane tanks such as the propane tanks for gas grills. Depending on the size of your greenhouse they might get you through a really cold dip.

My Mother-In-Law has a roof mounted manifold made from black PVC which acts as a water heater. The back side of her roof gets nearly 100% sunlight and the sunlight heats up water flowing through the manifold back and forth around sections of 20' or so pipe. She uses a pool pump to push the water up to the roof, lets the sunlight heat it and gravity drives the water back down to the pool. It's a pretty cool little DIY setup that prolongs her pool season into the winter months.

24
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Jaboticaba bonsai?
« on: August 29, 2022, 07:30:24 AM »
Sounds like you are on the right track!

Would love to see some pics; now, and as you progress.

I can make that happen later this morning. :)

25
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Jaboticaba bonsai?
« on: August 28, 2022, 01:32:47 PM »
I have started bonsai-ing to some degree.  Every time I repot, I prune the tree and literally saw off the bottom third or so of the rootball and plant it into a wider-but-shallower pot.   I have a 2year old habanero growing in a pie pan, and citrus and guavas in similarly proportioned containers (though larger, ~2ft diameter, 4" deep).   

I haven't done much with jaboticabas because I want to get them to fruiting stage, but I guess you could cut them back once they reach it and still make a rather small bonsai, and slowly flatten the rootball like I was suggesting above.  I don't know what time of year is optimal, I do it whenever they look unbalanced for their container.

The books I've read on bonsai seemed mainly focused on tree selection and aesthetic stuff like root flare and wiring the limbs to be curvy.  I don't feel like I got much out of them.  I use the same soil as I do for normal containers, and I'm not interested in plucking leaves for photo shoots.

The most non-obvious part of bonsai I learned is that typically a tree is initially grown out to much larger than its planned bonsai size, and then pruned severely and shaped from then on.   Cheating in a sense, but the end result seems the same in a much shorter time.

I'm thinking about pruning them back and trimming the roots about 1/3 on a Sabara. Basically clearing out any crossing and sucker branches, aesthetically trimming them into a more 2D shape from the front instead of as a bush. I'm not concerned with doing anything tricky with the roots other than making sure they don't get overly root bound. A buddy of mine owns a nursery and has a theory that Jaboticabas that get root constricted will fruit and flower a lot sooner than trees in the ground, which is fine. The goal is to keep them in medium sized bonsai pots which is what I have them in now, about 12" deep and wide 5 gallon pots. I'm thinking winter in North Florida or early spring would be the ideal time to re-pot and prune them but i'd like more opinions on that.

Ive never bonsai'd any of my jabos, but have several bonsais going for over 2 decades. Jabo is a good candidate due to beauty, shallow root system, and slow growth.

Trimming the tap root and root ball without killing it is the idea.

In a small pot, dries out quick, so ample water and misting would be key, especially after pruning roots.

While people will bring their trees indoors, best not to keep them indoors for too long. Happy healthy trees on display indoors are only visiting.

The goal is to keep them potted on my back deck year round pretty much. It's a north-eastern facing deck which means there are some areas that get good sun and some areas that get total shade. Right now I have each potted Jaboticaba in part sun where they get some direct sun in the morning and shade and dappled sunlight through our adjacent oak trees in the afternoons. They're new-to-me this past spring and each one has doubled in size from new growth if not tripled. They appear to be very happy and healthy looking little bushes at the moment and I think they'd be great bonsai candidates.

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