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I've also wanted to grow pomegranates in FL, but all I've found are sad answers. I've yet to see a review that the tropical pomegranates are worth eating, and the state is too humid to grow temperate pomegranates without spraying for fungus several times a year. Even if you were willing to spray temperate poms they still might not work out for you in Wellington because they do need some chill hours (~200?).

I contacted Green Sea Farms before they shut down (they were running a huge pom variety trial for UF) to ask about what varieties resisted humidity & diseases the best, and they recommended Christina and Vories varieties. I have in my notes that UF says that Christina is popular as a home garden cultivar and is reliable in the humid south. It originates in North Florida and that it has a mild taste with pale, almost clear, arils. It did 'fair' in taste tests. Vories originates in Gainesville, FL, has a 'sweet flavor' and has a light yellow or colorless arils.

Parfianka has great fruit, but it would need to be sprayed else a fungus will rot the fruit. The disease looks a lot like blossom end rot.

Sounds like it's not worth the hassle for my parents. Ill have to send them fruits from cali then. I'll trade them for the mamey, Abiu and Ilama off the trees that I just bought them!
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In case you don't find someone, Lara Farms has this in stock (https://larafarmsmiami.com/products/pomegranate). I'm not affiliated, but I've been pleased with the plants I've gotten from them.

Thanks! I do know they have it, so it is a backup plan. I've only recently learned about this variety.
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It does look like bacon, but it is much smaller. Also, when it starts to get soft, it goes bad quickly if you don't eat it within a day or two. Three fruits went bad (mold) out of 11 fruits, so I just saved the seeds for planting. I forgot to mention the skin is very thin, cannot be peeled.
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Looks a lot like bacon
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Here's a few photos of the grafted branch.






Hello Kaz, the delores I had is not seedless.  Did frank say it was a seedless variety?
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Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Looking to buy fresh ďjapanese raisin tree fruitĒ
« Last post by JoeP450 on October 05, 2022, 11:14:36 PM »
Really curious to try this, as I enjoy dried figs and dates in my morning oatmeal and on their own which I hear itís similar?

If anyone is selling please reach out.

Thanks
Joe
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The best guava Iíve ever eaten came off orkineís tree:








If I recall right he said itís a seedling from Mexican cream, which confuses me how the pinkish flesh, but this was a legit guava. My tasting notes were sweet flavor with some watermelon notes, hardly noticeable bitter/skin tannin.

-joe
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Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Container friendly tropicals that max out at 9 feet?
« Last post by kybishop on October 05, 2022, 11:09:42 PM »
Hereís my advice.
Stay away from dragon fruit. Everyone who grows up north says it gets too big and isnít worth the time growing it.

Garcinias like achacha and lemon drop are slow growing. Buy larger trees or wait 10 years. Ok just kidding but they are slow growers and achacha took 15 years to fruit for Tropical Fruit Hunters. Check him out. He grew a lot of tropicals in  his greenhouse in Ohio. And has a nice blog. Lemon drop is faster and mine should be fruiting in a couple more years.

And stay away from ultra tropicals. It took me a while but I realized itís not worth growing stuff thatís not gonna fruit. Climate is too harsh even with greenhouse to grow lots of palms, mangosteen, breadfruit, durian etc. itís up to you what you want to grow, just for me I like to grow stuff that has a chance at fruiting here.

Jaboticabas, Eugeniaís, sapodilla, muntingia, mango, citrus, lychee, etc can all stay small in pots with pruning. Iíve fruited most of those listed in pots too.
Iíd be happy to hook you up with some plants if you want. Feel free to reach out.

PM sent!

Good to know on dragon fruit. I was pretty iffy on it anyways. I already have a mini collection of different Echinopsis that I kind of dread getting too large ;D Might just have to start topping them yearly and making use of them ;)

I'll have to hunt down Tropical Fruit Hunters' experience with achacha. I'll definitely be in it for the long haul with that one. Maybe I'll get lucky and the longer light hours I can provide via the grow lights will get it to grow/fruit a little faster.
30
Hereís my advice.
Stay away from dragon fruit. Everyone who grows up north says it gets too big and isnít worth the time growing it.

Garcinias like achacha and lemon drop are slow growing. Buy larger trees or wait 10 years. Ok just kidding but they are slow growers and achacha took 15 years to fruit for Tropical Fruit Hunters. Check him out. He grew a lot of tropicals in  his greenhouse in Ohio. And has a nice blog. Lemon drop is faster and mine should be fruiting in a couple more years.

And stay away from ultra tropicals. It took me a while but I realized itís not worth growing stuff thatís not gonna fruit. Climate is too harsh even with greenhouse to grow lots of palms, mangosteen, breadfruit, durian etc. itís up to you what you want to grow, just for me I like to grow stuff that has a chance at fruiting here.

Jaboticabas, Eugeniaís, sapodilla, muntingia, mango, citrus, lychee, etc can all stay small in pots with pruning. Iíve fruited most of those listed in pots too.
Iíd be happy to hook you up with some plants if you want. Feel free to reach out.
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