Author Topic: Malaysian Red Guava Ripening  (Read 998 times)

SHV

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Malaysian Red Guava Ripening
« on: January 29, 2020, 10:01:32 PM »
I have a couple red guava trees that have been loaded with fruit for several months.  This is their first year beating fruit.  For the last two months, the fruits have stopped swelling, changed color, but remain rock hard. All of my other guava (tropic white and Mexican pink) have ripened and were devoured by December. Is this just a case of continuing to wait?  Do Malaysian reds take longer to ripen?  I assume the our Winter temps in SD have slowed down the ripening process, but I was hoping to benefit from your experience in growing this variety. Thoughts?  Sample guava picts for your viewing pleasure.




AndrewAZ

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Re: Malaysian Red Guava Ripening
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2020, 11:11:41 PM »
I was told to wait until guava's fall of the tree for maximum sweetness and ripening.

Ckitto

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Re: Malaysian Red Guava Ripening
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2020, 12:14:19 AM »
Fruits can still develop throughout winter. Malaysian red is an easy one for me. I can smell it when the fruits are ripe and ready. Color also change to lighter maroon.

SHV

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Re: Malaysian Red Guava Ripening
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2020, 04:43:18 PM »
Thanks for both replies. Sounds like I will have to be patient a bit longer. Unfortunately, the local wildlife have been sampling a few to confirm ripeness.  My only other concern is the mold that develops at the base of the fruit as it continues to hang on the trees.

spaugh

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Re: Malaysian Red Guava Ripening
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2020, 05:08:28 PM »
I was told to wait until guava's fall of the tree for maximum sweetness and ripening.

They are usually mushy by that point.  Each variety has its own best time of ripeness to pick.  Usually when its green/yellow and just starting to soften and several days before falling off its best to me.  Some are picked green and crunchy, just depends on the type.

There were a lot of negative reviews on this red malaysian guava in the past.  Most said it was mediocre at best.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2020, 05:15:16 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Malaysian Red Guava Ripening
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2020, 09:10:50 PM »
I have two varieties, Malaysian and Thai red. The trees look similar but fruits are different outside and inside. Both taste good, although I like the Thai better. I pick them when they become fragrant, the skin changes color and they are falling to your hand or in the bag. If you live the fruit on the counter it will start to spoil.  Better to eat it after picking. That is my experience.

 

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