Author Topic: New Zill mangoes -- The monoembryonic vs polyembryonic breakdown  (Read 56385 times)

driftwood

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Re: New Zill mangoes -- The monoembryonic vs polyembryonic breakdown
« Reply #225 on: July 30, 2021, 01:27:53 PM »
If you hsve plenty of time and space and want to pkant seeds for experiments or just for shits and giggles,  then great but otherwise why are people planting seeds?  With the time, effort  and aforementioned space, just buy grafted trees.  They are available and while they may cost more for some, it will still save monetarily in the long run.

I don't get it ether unless somebody plants hundreds of seeds.

Growing a root stock from seed and grafting it with a neighbors scion much cheaper than buying a 300$ grafted tree from nursery. Not to say its not worth it, but if you have access to scions. which aren't that hard to find, why not?

driftwood

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Re: New Zill mangoes -- The monoembryonic vs polyembryonic breakdown
« Reply #226 on: July 30, 2021, 01:29:04 PM »
Polyembryonic mangifera indica seeds produces nucellar clones, they are not a zygotic offspring.
Australian research papper suggest to leave only the most vigorous shoot and cut the others out.


If you hsve plenty of time and space and want to pkant seeds for experiments or just for shits and giggles,  then great but otherwise why are people planting seeds?  With the time, effort  and aforementioned space, just buy grafted trees.  They are available and while they may cost more for some, it will still save monetarily in the long run.

I don't get it ether unless somebody plants hundreds of seeds.

Interesting!

Goyo626

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Re: New Zill mangoes -- The monoembryonic vs polyembryonic breakdown
« Reply #227 on: September 23, 2021, 11:03:52 AM »

m-4 seed


buttercream seed


To my untrained eye they look poly but can someone with more experience chime in?

simon_grow

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Re: New Zill mangoes -- The monoembryonic vs polyembryonic breakdown
« Reply #228 on: September 24, 2021, 12:31:53 AM »
Itís kinda hard to tell, especially without seeing both sides of the seed but they both look mono to me. I call it a poly seed if I see definitive borders or segmentations of the seed. Seeing multiple origins of roots on the same seed is another good indication that a seed is Polyembryonic.

Simon

Goyo626

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Re: New Zill mangoes -- The monoembryonic vs polyembryonic breakdown
« Reply #229 on: September 24, 2021, 10:02:27 AM »
Itís kinda hard to tell, especially without seeing both sides of the seed but they both look mono to me. I call it a poly seed if I see definitive borders or segmentations of the seed. Seeing multiple origins of roots on the same seed is another good indication that a seed is Polyembryonic.

Simon

I checked both seeds and the m4 does look like mono. But the butter cream fell apart into pieces so im assuming its poly.

simon_grow

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Re: New Zill mangoes -- The monoembryonic vs polyembryonic breakdown
« Reply #230 on: September 24, 2021, 11:17:04 AM »
If it fell apart into pieces without breaking, it could be poly. I also found a ButterCream that appeared to be poly but when I planted the seed, only 1 sprout came up. Sometimes the smaller segments of poly seeds just donít sprout.

Simon

Jagmanjoe

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Re: New Zill mangoes -- The monoembryonic vs polyembryonic breakdown
« Reply #231 on: August 03, 2022, 07:45:18 AM »
I do recognize that this is an old thread, BUT, it looks like more than a few of the posts here spoke of growing a number of varieties from seeds for fruit as well as some that grew specific rootstock to graft and grow different varieties.

Considering the significant rise in prices for grafted trees, I would be very interested in the status of these "experiments".  Not only for actual time to produce fruit and the quality of it but also those who grew specific seedlings and grafted known scions.  The latter of which I would also be interested in the successful grafts, how long it took to produce fruit.

Even with purchasing up to a larger grafted tree, I am hearing that it could take a couple more years in the ground to produce fruit. And to me, even if the seedling doesn't turn out to be a clone of a known variety, if it tastes good it is a win, if it isn't good, a known scion could still be grafted to it.

 

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