Author Topic: Gummosis problem  (Read 558 times)

franklazar26

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Gummosis problem
« on: August 16, 2022, 11:21:25 PM »
Iíve stumbled upon a few more issues regarding my trees. It seems that several have this gummosis issue, most start at the base of the tree and kill them from the base up. Iíve recently had it on some in the upper parts too. Is there anything that treats this? Or are my trees that develop it, goners?

Some pics of the stuff. On my VPL I peeled back some of the soft mushy bark, seems rather brown and unhealthy. I feel impending doom coming anyways.









vnomonee

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Re: Gummosis problem
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2022, 11:40:17 PM »
Hi frank, my grafted xie shan satsuma started doing this over the winter. i bought "gardenphos" which is a systemic fungicide (phosphorus acid) did a leaf spray made  and a soil drench over the course of the winter. so far there has not been any more gummosis from that tree and I haven't noticed it in any of my other plants. Not sure if it was already infected when I purchased it (BriteLeaf) or if it caught it from the enviornment here in NJ. Apparently its phytophthora that causes it and it starts at the roots so treat your soil. it can also enter tree wounds so make sure nothing splashes any cuts or scrapes on your trunk or anywhere you did a graft especially if its going to rain.

also what is your potting medium? does it stay wet for a long time?
« Last Edit: August 17, 2022, 12:03:31 AM by vnomonee »

pagnr

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Re: Gummosis problem
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2022, 06:13:32 AM »
Root diseases are generally thought to be more prevalent under unfavourable conditions.
Roots in a cold,saturated,  wet zone at the bottom of a pot could be alleviated by increasing Air filled porosity and drainage.
Repotting into a taller pots without disturbance may help.
Composted chicken manure ( also a Phosphorous source ) is said to have anti Phytophora properties.
Silica is also seen as a useful addition. Various natural minerals supply Silica, an essential plant nutrient that may be absent from Hydroponics or some pot mixes.
Composted fish fertiliser, with a high crustacean content is said to be useful. Fungi have Chitin based cell walls, as do Arthropods.
Some claim the enzymes in composted crustaceans fertiliser can be anti Fungal.
In Australia composted Eucalypt sawdust is a useful addition to pot mix for root disease suppression, above that of properly composted pine bark.

Other factors that promote root disease are root damage,  from incorrect fertiliser application rates, and excessive drying out of the pot mix between waterings.
( drying out increases the fertiliser concentration in the pot mix, more fertiliser in less water ).

franklazar26

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Re: Gummosis problem
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2022, 08:08:27 AM »
Hi frank, my grafted xie shan satsuma started doing this over the winter. i bought "gardenphos" which is a systemic fungicide (phosphorus acid) did a leaf spray made  and a soil drench over the course of the winter. so far there has not been any more gummosis from that tree and I haven't noticed it in any of my other plants. Not sure if it was already infected when I purchased it (BriteLeaf) or if it caught it from the enviornment here in NJ. Apparently its phytophthora that causes it and it starts at the roots so treat your soil. it can also enter tree wounds so make sure nothing splashes any cuts or scrapes on your trunk or anywhere you did a graft especially if its going to rain.

also what is your potting medium? does it stay wet for a long time?

Interesting, as itís only my briteleaf plants that are affected. Everything else is in the same potting media, made of coco chips, coco coir, and perlite with an added biochar. Iíll have to contact them and ask a little about it. Iíve had about 6-8 brite leaf rooted cuttings develop this, some even croak. Iíll be grabbing a systemic fungicide though! Thank you for the input!

franklazar26

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Re: Gummosis problem
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2022, 08:09:29 AM »
Root diseases are generally thought to be more prevalent under unfavourable conditions.
Roots in a cold,saturated,  wet zone at the bottom of a pot could be alleviated by increasing Air filled porosity and drainage.
Repotting into a taller pots without disturbance may help.
Composted chicken manure ( also a Phosphorous source ) is said to have anti Phytophora properties.
Silica is also seen as a useful addition. Various natural minerals supply Silica, an essential plant nutrient that may be absent from Hydroponics or some pot mixes.
Composted fish fertiliser, with a high crustacean content is said to be useful. Fungi have Chitin based cell walls, as do Arthropods.
Some claim the enzymes in composted crustaceans fertiliser can be anti Fungal.
In Australia composted Eucalypt sawdust is a useful addition to pot mix for root disease suppression, above that of properly composted pine bark.

Other factors that promote root disease are root damage,  from incorrect fertiliser application rates, and excessive drying out of the pot mix between waterings.
( drying out increases the fertiliser concentration in the pot mix, more fertiliser in less water ).

Thatís some good stuff! Thank you for that info! Iím thinking Iíll try a systemic fungicide first and go from there!

vnomonee

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Re: Gummosis problem
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2022, 12:01:00 PM »
Let me know what they say, can't be coincidence that we both have infected plants from them

pagnr

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Re: Gummosis problem
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2022, 06:28:40 PM »
 Everything else is in the same potting media, made of coco chips, coco coir, and perlite with an added biochar.

Seems like a reasonable choice of pot mix components.
The ratio of these is important, in balancing water holding and air pore space.
None are completely inert, they all take up water to various degrees.
Some inert components, like quartz gravel,may give the same structure, but lower saturation.
Generally I stop at 33% coir for my mixes.
( that is the finer grade coirs, also same for other fine grade bog peats }
Most of the methods I mentioned are preventative or suppressive, although they might help recovery.
I would warn about trying everything at once to fix a problem.
Many nursery plants are grown and shipped with a dose of Fungicide to ward off problems, they might go backwards after it wears off.
A fungicide treatment sounds the best first option in your case.
It does sound like a possible problem with cutting raised plants ?


 
« Last Edit: August 19, 2022, 04:42:44 AM by pagnr »

citrange

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Re: Gummosis problem
« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2022, 12:36:38 PM »
There is one fungicide which is said to specifically control phytophthera. This is Fosetyl-Aluminium sold as Aliette. See for instance https://www.cropscience.bayer.us/products/fungicides/aliette
As others have said, the best way to guard against the problem is to avoid saturated medium. Make sure water can drain freely through and out of the pot in abround 30 seconds. I also re-plant with the stem raised a little above the surface of the pot mix, even with the highest roots showing.

franklazar26

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Re: Gummosis problem
« Reply #8 on: August 18, 2022, 01:14:24 PM »
There is one fungicide which is said to specifically control phytophthera. This is Fosetyl-Aluminium sold as Aliette. See for instance https://www.cropscience.bayer.us/products/fungicides/aliette
As others have said, the best way to guard against the problem is to avoid saturated medium. Make sure water can drain freely through and out of the pot in abround 30 seconds. I also re-plant with the stem raised a little above the surface of the pot mix, even with the highest roots showing.

I went with another recommendation, the exact stuff Vnomonee said. Itís also said to control phytophthera as well! Iím hoping it does some magic.

In other regards, I use a 2:1:1 mix of coco chips, coir, perlite. It doesnít hold water in the slightest, no longer than a day or two at most even on less warm days. It drains very freely, much less than 30s lol. Probably like 5s tops before it comes spilling out. I have very few trees infected, but most certainly all rooted cuttings.

impatientgardener

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Re: Gummosis problem
« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2022, 08:58:43 AM »
My variegated lemon did the EXACT same thing. However, it was a clipping and not a graft. I'm not sure if the variegation causes more weakness and susceptibility to crown rot, etc. I tried treatments using organicide plant doctor and phyton 35 a couple of weeks apart. Anyway, it lost all its leaves and died and I decided to go with a much taller grafted version which has had no problems. Good luck to you!
« Last Edit: August 26, 2022, 09:01:11 AM by impatientgardener »

franklazar26

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Re: Gummosis problem
« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2022, 01:23:48 PM »
My variegated lemon did the EXACT same thing. However, it was a clipping and not a graft. I'm not sure if the variegation causes more weakness and susceptibility to crown rot, etc. I tried treatments using organicide plant doctor and phyton 35 a couple of weeks apart. Anyway, it lost all its leaves and died and I decided to go with a much taller grafted version which has had no problems. Good luck to you!

Mine is a rooted cutting as well, however I've used "Garden Phos" an few times now and it seems that the gummosis has slowed, it also is still pushing out new growth so I assume I might be in the clear and caught it early enough.

I think most citrus are rather susceptible to root rot, trifoliate are highly resistant. So most grafted trees are unaffected for the most part.

brian

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Re: Gummosis problem
« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2022, 08:21:08 PM »
A half dozen of my trees had some gummosis a few years ago and agri-fos/garden-fos seemed to cure it for most of them, though a few died.  To be fair, I was pretty late in addressing the problem.

 

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