Author Topic: ILAMA - selecting seeds or plants from upper limit of habitat . . .  (Read 546 times)

Epicatt2

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Got to wondering whether selecting material (seeds or plants) of Annona macroprophyllata from the upper elevations of its natural habitat range would provide material which would be better suited to tolerating our cool winter temperatures here in Florida (9b).

Are there any TFF members growing such 'upper elevation' ilamas in central Florida who may have noticed better cold tolerance of theirs?

Or maybe member Raul in México will chime in here with some info since he collects seeds of this species in the wild.

¡Pura Tertulia!

Paul M.
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Mark B

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Re: ILAMA - selecting seeds or plants from upper limit of habitat . . .
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2022, 11:49:46 AM »
Ilamas are surprisingly cold tolerant.  The main issue for ilamas in Florida is excessive rain during certain months

Epicatt2

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Re: ILAMA - selecting seeds or plants from upper limit of habitat . . .
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2022, 03:24:30 PM »
Ilamas are surprisingly cold tolerant.  The main issue for ilamas in Florida is excessive rain during certain months

Thanks for the reply Mark.

So, do ilamas require a long dry-off period during their annual cycle?  How long and when, please?

And Mark, how cold have your ilamas survved down to, and how old were they at that time?

Regards

Paul M.
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Bob407

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Re: ILAMA - selecting seeds or plants from upper limit of habitat . . .
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2022, 04:12:13 PM »
I sourced seeds from higher elevation and wetter/cooler climate ilamas in the Sierra Madre. A number of these seedlings have made it to Central and South Florida. I’l be curious to learn how they perform
after a few seasons.
Life is good

Faldon

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Re: ILAMA - selecting seeds or plants from upper limit of habitat . . .
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2022, 05:21:12 PM »
I am growing ilama seeding in the south korea. (Winter is cold.....)

In my green house during winter, it can be live above 10C.

I am not sure, it can be live under 10C but I think it's hardiness better than soursop.


FruitGrower

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Re: ILAMA - selecting seeds or plants from upper limit of habitat . . .
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2022, 12:25:35 AM »
Ilamas are surprisingly cold tolerant.  The main issue for ilamas in Florida is excessive rain during certain months

Thanks for the reply Mark.

So, do ilamas require a long dry-off period during their annual cycle?  How long and when, please?

And Mark, how cold have your ilamas survved down to, and how old were they at that time?

Regards

Paul M.
==

Har spoke about this in one of the Truly Tropical videos he did. If I recall correctly, he said they need a dry summer followed by a rainy fall.

Like Mark B, Ive also heard that the rain is a problem in Florida. Does anyone know if its only the rain or is humidity also a factor?

Mark B

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Re: ILAMA - selecting seeds or plants from upper limit of habitat . . .
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2022, 09:53:57 AM »
I live in Miami so, I haven't had to deal with frost or freezes yet.  Ilama growers in Central Florida and California should have more insight on cold tolerance.
In it's native habitat, there is a long dry season from, approximately late fall to late spring.  Excessive rain during the winter dormant period is very detrimental to ilama, particularly the root system.  Also, If the rainy season starts too early, it can have an adverse effect on fruit quality. 

Epicatt2

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Re: ILAMA - selecting seeds or plants from upper limit of habitat . . .
« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2022, 01:26:07 PM »
I live in Miami so, I haven't had to deal with frost or freezes yet.  Ilama growers in Central Florida and California should have more insight on cold tolerance.

In fact, I was actually hoping that some TFF members from central Florida would chime in about their experiences with their ilama's cold tolerance, but maybe there aren't very many TFF members growing this in central Florida.

Cheers!

Paul M.
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« Last Edit: September 23, 2022, 03:33:58 AM by Epicatt2 »

OCchris1

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Re: ILAMA - selecting seeds or plants from upper limit of habitat . . .
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2022, 01:55:06 AM »
I have zero issues with Annona during Winter months. I have grown all the "less hardy" stuff and its been no problem. Try if you can. I've grown and sold many Ilamas and my tree is grafted onto cherimoya rootstock. Good luck
-Chris

Galatians522

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Re: ILAMA - selecting seeds or plants from upper limit of habitat . . .
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2022, 12:05:48 AM »
If it helps any, there are at least 2 Ilamas in Sebring. They would have gone through 28 at a minimum this last winter (one is bearing fruit this year). I would say they are approximately equal in hardiness to mango and maybe slightly harder. They appear to be more resilient/long lived than sugarapple.

Epicatt2

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Re: ILAMA - selecting seeds or plants from upper limit of habitat . . .
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2022, 03:29:09 AM »
If it helps any, there are at least 2 Ilamas in Sebring. They would have gone through 28 at a minimum this last winter (one is bearing fruit this year). I would say they are approximately equal in hardiness to mango and maybe slightly harder. They appear to be more resilient/long lived than sugarapple.

Thanks for the encouraging reply, Galatians. I'm glad to hear this; it offers me some hope.  Though further south than Tampa, Sebring is inland and Tampa is on the coast so I'm guessing that Tampa is a few degrees warmer than inland Sebring is.

Guess I'll hafta bite the bullet and plant my larger ilama in the ground next season.

Fingers X-ed!

Paul M.
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