Author Topic: The most hardy non trifolate citrus tree  (Read 535 times)

Unicyclemike

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The most hardy non trifolate citrus tree
« on: September 04, 2022, 04:53:36 PM »
I live in zone 7a/6b and looking for the most cold tolerant citrus that is not a trifolate? The best place to purchase it? Thank you.

Mike Adams

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Re: The most hardy non trifolate citrus tree
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2022, 06:33:23 PM »
Prague citsuma - Stan McKenzie citrus

poncirsguy

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Re: The most hardy non trifolate citrus tree
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2022, 06:56:23 PM »
Changsha  Mandarin..  Ripens before first frost.

1rainman

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Re: The most hardy non trifolate citrus tree
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2022, 07:25:47 PM »
Some type of sour orange that isn't much better than trifoliate. The most hardy citrus that is good to eat is a grapefruit. After that would be tangerine, grapefruit hybrids like honey bell. Then hardy mandarin/tangerine like satsuma. Not exact but the general order of things.

vnomonee

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Re: The most hardy non trifolate citrus tree
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2022, 07:39:53 PM »
Prague Citsuma, is a chimera of poncirus and some kind of mandarin. It produces mandarin like fruit without the poncirus flavors. I have one outside in 7a, will report on survival after this winter.

Changsha is very hardy although you still need to protect it in 7a.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2022, 07:41:25 PM by vnomonee »

vnomonee

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« Last Edit: September 04, 2022, 07:43:48 PM by vnomonee »

Peep

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Re: The most hardy non trifolate citrus tree
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2022, 09:06:28 PM »
Is Yuzu not more cold hardy than Changsha?

poncirsguy

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Re: The most hardy non trifolate citrus tree
« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2022, 11:40:23 PM »
yes but Yuzu is not edible

tedburn

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Re: The most hardy non trifolate citrus tree
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2022, 12:20:04 AM »
Prag Chimera, Thomasville and Sanford Curafora F2, but Prag Chimera has the plus of in the season ripening fruits normally before hard frosts.
See also my report in this forum.
Regards Frank

pagnr

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Re: The most hardy non trifolate citrus tree
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2022, 03:27:23 AM »
yes but Yuzu is not edible

It's not inedible either. You can certainly make drinks, cakes, etc out of it.
A multitude of "yuses".
Better than Poncirus fruit.

Another very hardy Citrus is Nansho Dai Dai, Citrus taiwanica, possibly even too sour for Yuzu eaters ?

Anybody want to tackle the question of the rootstock for "zone 7a/6b, most cold tolerant citrus"
Own rooted plant or on a cold tolerant inducing rootstock ( Poncirus  ? ).

poncirsguy

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Re: The most hardy non trifolate citrus tree
« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2022, 04:28:10 PM »
When does Prag Chimera ripen.  My first frost comes end of October- mid November.  I can protect against a late October frost but a November first frost is usually a low 20's or teen's frost.  I rarely drop below 5 and often not below 10.  Our record low is -25F.

Peep

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Re: The most hardy non trifolate citrus tree
« Reply #11 on: September 06, 2022, 09:40:25 PM »
When does Prag Chimera ripen.  My first frost comes end of October- mid November.  I can protect against a late October frost but a November first frost is usually a low 20's or teen's frost.  I rarely drop below 5 and often not below 10.  Our record low is -25F.

My Prague is too small to have fruit, but I've read that in Western Europe (France) it's ripe in December.

Nick C

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Re: The most hardy non trifolate citrus tree
« Reply #12 on: September 06, 2022, 10:45:12 PM »
I have yuzu and xie shan satsuma in ground with only a non heated hoop house as protection in 7A

SoCal2warm

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Re: The most hardy non trifolate citrus tree
« Reply #13 on: September 28, 2022, 02:46:46 AM »
I have been experimenting with pretty much all of the rare non-trifoliate hardy citrus trees.

My results so far seem to show that Changsha is the hardiest of them. Yuzu is a close second, but does not seem to be as hardy as Changsha. But I cannot be absolutely sure about this.   

All of the research from things I have read have informed me that Ichang papeda should be the hardiest non-trifoliate citrus, but that is not what my experimental observations have shown. I had obtained Ichang papeda from two different sources in the Portland, Oregon area but it is possible they might have originated from the same source and could have perhaps been grown from some specific seedling that had less hardiness than its parent, though I think this is not so likely.

Plants were grown in the Pacific Northwest, climate zone 8a, and last winter had a low that may have gone down to as low as 9 degrees F one night, though other than that it was not a very cold winter. It killed some of the Yuzu plants, even one that had been surviving for several years through cold winters before that, but a Changsha that was planted in a very protected spot and sheltered by a large bush growing around it (although it was not covered) survived and even kept all its leaves.

To be fair, I have not grown Prague Citsuma, but another member of this forum is growing one in a protected spot and in the middle of a suburban neighborhood across the bridge from Portland (also zone 8a). Its leaves did not seem to look as good as the Changsha he was growing, which one might perhaps take as an indicator of cold tolerance. I got to taste the inside of the fruit. It was very much like Satsuma mandarin but the fruits were smaller, more sour, and perhaps just a little bit less ripe tasting, but not bad at all.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2022, 03:00:06 AM by SoCal2warm »

 

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