The Tropical Fruit Forum

Tropical Fruit => Tropical Fruit Discussion => Topic started by: FlyingFoxFruits on July 07, 2021, 03:04:41 PM

Title: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on July 07, 2021, 03:04:41 PM
this is pure red jaboticaba pulp, freeze dried, the result is one of the most amazing fruit related items you can taste...like jaboticaba cotton candy with a crunch...intense flavor...sweet with some sour...my favorite thing to do with jaboticaba for sure...(not a wine drinker here lol...fruit leathers used to be the thing, but that's soooo 2000 and late)


(https://i.postimg.cc/dZLsKVHY/211842827-4170152793073450-3780606993449720765-n.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/dZLsKVHY)

(https://i.postimg.cc/LhX6PxHb/212818128-1682739725449818-5296219621470307645-n.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/LhX6PxHb)

(https://i.postimg.cc/PNRfQ1Jr/213162880-1682739735449817-5679692509084311319-n.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/PNRfQ1Jr)
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: Lovetoplant on July 07, 2021, 03:23:59 PM
Look like canned tuna without water lol.  I canned tuna from fishing trip.
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on July 08, 2021, 01:56:34 PM
been selling jars on ebay at auction, they start at a penny and go pretty high from there...I guess this food product is hard to source for some reason?
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: Triloba Tracker on July 08, 2021, 04:52:31 PM
Sounds great! Would love to try it but not if dem crazies bid it thru the roof!
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: ScottR on July 08, 2021, 07:18:44 PM
Great description Adam 8)
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: roblack on July 08, 2021, 09:10:04 PM
That looks interesting Adam, throw up an auction!

How did you process jaboticaba prior to freeze drying. Seems like an arduous task unless you know what you are doing.
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on July 10, 2021, 02:31:02 PM
links to what the jars look like.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/194232323001 (https://www.ebay.com/itm/194232323001)

https://www.ebay.com/itm/194232320248 (https://www.ebay.com/itm/194232320248)
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: W. on July 10, 2021, 08:35:20 PM
It looks like freeze drying jaboticaba pulp would be an arduous, time-consuming process. I think getting $30-40 per jar would probably be the only way it would pay off for the time and effort expended. That being said, Adam's freeze dried Pitangatuba looks like it was relatively easy to make. Freeze dried Pitangatuba could be something that ends up in grocery stores (or at least specialty groceries) in the future.
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: bsbullie on July 10, 2021, 09:44:54 PM
It looks like freeze drying jaboticaba pulp would be an arduous, time-consuming process. I think getting $30-40 per jar would probably be the only way it would pay off for the time and effort expended. That being said, Adam's freeze dried Pitangatuba looks like it was relatively easy to make. Freeze dried Pitangatuba could be something that ends up in grocery stores (or at least specialty groceries) in the future.

Pitangatuba, in any format, will not be in any store.  Outside of collectors, its not widely known.  Its not a feasible cash crop and too delicate to transport for selling whole or to a processing plant.

With that being said,  both of Adam's freeze dried fruit look delish and worth the money they are fetching.
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: simon_grow on July 10, 2021, 10:15:09 PM
It looks super delicious Adam, I would have never thought of making that with Jaboticabas.

Simon
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: Ognin525 on July 10, 2021, 11:14:12 PM
I somehow won his first jar of kimbers. Its amazing! Its nice and crunchy at first almost tasting like sweet freeze dried strawberries then a couple chews in, the jaboticaba flavor comes through! Its really good id suggest anyone who has the chance GET SOME while you can. I herd from adam theres about 100ish jabos in each jar. Only alittle left in my jar😭😭😭.
(https://i.postimg.cc/8JNg6C76/1625973098956502446636744540018.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/8JNg6C76)
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: W. on July 11, 2021, 02:35:42 PM
It looks like freeze drying jaboticaba pulp would be an arduous, time-consuming process. I think getting $30-40 per jar would probably be the only way it would pay off for the time and effort expended. That being said, Adam's freeze dried Pitangatuba looks like it was relatively easy to make. Freeze dried Pitangatuba could be something that ends up in grocery stores (or at least specialty groceries) in the future.

Pitangatuba, in any format, will not be in any store.  Outside of collectors, its not widely known.  Its not a feasible cash crop and too delicate to transport for selling whole or to a processing plant.

With that being said,  both of Adam's freeze dried fruit look delish and worth the money they are fetching.

I think that is an ignorant, narrow-minded statement. At one time, most of the fruit that we all enjoy on this forum was not widely known in the US, outside of collectors. Go ask someone living in the US (outside of Florida) a century ago, "What is a mango?" Go ask someone living in the US fifty years ago, "What is a kiwi?" Go ask someone twenty years ago, "What is a jackfruit," or "what is a mamey sapote," or "what is a rambutan" or about any number of tropical fruits that can now be found in supermarkets throughout the US today?

Pitangatuba has an interesting flavor. It has an interesting shape. Adam Shafran's name for it, starcherry, has a nice ring to it. It is probably too delicate and perishable for fresh fruit sales, though grapes and most berries are not exactly robust fruits. But, freeze drying and other processing methods could open up new possibilities for making Pitangatuba a viable agricultural crop and a presence in groceries stories across the US. Right now, 99.9% of Americans have never heard of Pitangatuba. In ten or twenty years, that could change with the presence of bags of dried starcherries next to dried cranberries and trail mix in grocery stories from coast to coast.
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: bsbullie on July 11, 2021, 03:34:44 PM
It looks like freeze drying jaboticaba pulp would be an arduous, time-consuming process. I think getting $30-40 per jar would probably be the only way it would pay off for the time and effort expended. That being said, Adam's freeze dried Pitangatuba looks like it was relatively easy to make. Freeze dried Pitangatuba could be something that ends up in grocery stores (or at least specialty groceries) in the future.

Pitangatuba, in any format, will not be in any store.  Outside of collectors, its not widely known.  Its not a feasible cash crop and too delicate to transport for selling whole or to a processing plant.

With that being said,  both of Adam's freeze dried fruit look delish and worth the money they are fetching.

I think that is an ignorant, narrow-minded statement. At one time, most of the fruit that we all enjoy on this forum was not widely known in the US, outside of collectors. Go ask someone living in the US (outside of Florida) a century ago, "What is a mango?" Go ask someone living in the US fifty years ago, "What is a kiwi?" Go ask someone twenty years ago, "What is a jackfruit," or "what is a mamey sapote," or "what is a rambutan" or about any number of tropical fruits that can now be found in supermarkets throughout the US today?

Pitangatuba has an interesting flavor. It has an interesting shape. Adam Shafran's name for it, starcherry, has a nice ring to it. It is probably too delicate and perishable for fresh fruit sales, though grapes and most berries are not exactly robust fruits. But, freeze drying and other processing methods could open up new possibilities for making Pitangatuba a viable agricultural crop and a presence in groceries stories across the US. Right now, 99.9% of Americans have never heard of Pitangatuba. In ten or twenty years, that could change with the presence of bags of dried starcherries next to dried cranberries and trail mix in grocery stories from coast to coast.

Im ignotmrant?  Blah blah blah ..classic response from a dumbass.
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on July 12, 2021, 04:54:43 PM
I somehow won his first jar of kimbers. Its amazing! Its nice and crunchy at first almost tasting like sweet freeze dried strawberries then a couple chews in, the jaboticaba flavor comes through! Its really good id suggest anyone who has the chance GET SOME while you can. I herd from adam theres about 100ish jabos in each jar. Only alittle left in my jar😭😭😭.
(https://i.postimg.cc/8JNg6C76/1625973098956502446636744540018.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/8JNg6C76)

thanks for purchasing and sharing the pics!

I doesn't last too long, like expensive candy I guess...but not as bad for you i'd assume.

I think about a pound and a half of fruit yields 15 grams of FD pulp....white jaboticaba took like 300 fruits to make a small jar.
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: Ognin525 on July 12, 2021, 05:37:43 PM
Ya lasting long was not a problem for me haha it only made it 2 days i saved one little chunk for day 3 and everytime it was nice and crunchy. I could see once u open it eat it within a couple days its so crunchy and fluffy itll soak up humidity fast. I cant see anyone being able to save it longer than a few days after tasting it anyways lol. Keep up the good work adam!
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on July 14, 2021, 01:56:09 PM
making another batch here soon, from approx 13lbs of fruit, will see how many jars are made, maybe 15 at most I'm guessing (the typical sized jam jar i think is 16oz and I fit a little over 15grams in each jar)

ebay auctions for 3 jars of FD'd fruit end tonight  ;)
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: 850FL on July 14, 2021, 03:14:31 PM
It looks like freeze drying jaboticaba pulp would be an arduous, time-consuming process. I think getting $30-40 per jar would probably be the only way it would pay off for the time and effort expended. That being said, Adam's freeze dried Pitangatuba looks like it was relatively easy to make. Freeze dried Pitangatuba could be something that ends up in grocery stores (or at least specialty groceries) in the future.

Pitangatuba, in any format, will not be in any store.  Outside of collectors, its not widely known.  Its not a feasible cash crop and too delicate to transport for selling whole or to a processing plant.

With that being said,  both of Adam's freeze dried fruit look delish and worth the money they are fetching.

I think that is an ignorant, narrow-minded statement. At one time, most of the fruit that we all enjoy on this forum was not widely known in the US, outside of collectors. Go ask someone living in the US (outside of Florida) a century ago, "What is a mango?" Go ask someone living in the US fifty years ago, "What is a kiwi?" Go ask someone twenty years ago, "What is a jackfruit," or "what is a mamey sapote," or "what is a rambutan" or about any number of tropical fruits that can now be found in supermarkets throughout the US today?

Pitangatuba has an interesting flavor. It has an interesting shape. Adam Shafran's name for it, starcherry, has a nice ring to it. It is probably too delicate and perishable for fresh fruit sales, though grapes and most berries are not exactly robust fruits. But, freeze drying and other processing methods could open up new possibilities for making Pitangatuba a viable agricultural crop and a presence in groceries stories across the US. Right now, 99.9% of Americans have never heard of Pitangatuba. In ten or twenty years, that could change with the presence of bags of dried starcherries next to dried cranberries and trail mix in grocery stories from coast to coast.

He's probably actually right but I will say there is still always room for improvement within any species. And there are many other factors involved to whether a fruit makes it commercially or becomes commonplace in any aspect.

And most Americans probably don't eat very much of what should be considered healthy food in the first place. And the price of the product would probably be high, so even less consumers.. and so on..
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: W. on July 14, 2021, 06:00:53 PM
It looks like freeze drying jaboticaba pulp would be an arduous, time-consuming process. I think getting $30-40 per jar would probably be the only way it would pay off for the time and effort expended. That being said, Adam's freeze dried Pitangatuba looks like it was relatively easy to make. Freeze dried Pitangatuba could be something that ends up in grocery stores (or at least specialty groceries) in the future.

Pitangatuba, in any format, will not be in any store.  Outside of collectors, its not widely known.  Its not a feasible cash crop and too delicate to transport for selling whole or to a processing plant.

With that being said,  both of Adam's freeze dried fruit look delish and worth the money they are fetching.

I think that is an ignorant, narrow-minded statement. At one time, most of the fruit that we all enjoy on this forum was not widely known in the US, outside of collectors. Go ask someone living in the US (outside of Florida) a century ago, "What is a mango?" Go ask someone living in the US fifty years ago, "What is a kiwi?" Go ask someone twenty years ago, "What is a jackfruit," or "what is a mamey sapote," or "what is a rambutan" or about any number of tropical fruits that can now be found in supermarkets throughout the US today?

Pitangatuba has an interesting flavor. It has an interesting shape. Adam Shafran's name for it, starcherry, has a nice ring to it. It is probably too delicate and perishable for fresh fruit sales, though grapes and most berries are not exactly robust fruits. But, freeze drying and other processing methods could open up new possibilities for making Pitangatuba a viable agricultural crop and a presence in groceries stories across the US. Right now, 99.9% of Americans have never heard of Pitangatuba. In ten or twenty years, that could change with the presence of bags of dried starcherries next to dried cranberries and trail mix in grocery stories from coast to coast.

He's probably actually right but I will say there is still always room for improvement within any species. And there are many other factors involved to whether a fruit makes it commercially or becomes commonplace in any aspect.

And most Americans probably don't eat very much of what should be considered healthy food in the first place. And the price of the product would probably be high, so even less consumers.. and so on..

I agree that most Americans eat quite poorly. However, even if, say 75% of all Americans eat completely unhealthy garbage and nothing else (an exaggeration, to be fair), that would still leave 80 million Americans who do eat healthy foods such as fruit. That is a good-sized customer base with which to try and build an interest in Pitangatubas. Not that one would try and instantly create a national market for Pitangatubas. But, I think local interest could be drummed up in South Florida, Southern California, New York City, and maybe a couple of other places where there are large numbers of people with adventurous palates and disposable income. If those test markets become successful, then after a few years expand to a few more places. If successful, keep expanding. If not, stop. I am not saying Pitangatubas will replace apples in the produce section, but I think they could have potential as a specialty fruit or dried fruit product.
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: 850FL on July 15, 2021, 12:32:46 PM
It looks like freeze drying jaboticaba pulp would be an arduous, time-consuming process. I think getting $30-40 per jar would probably be the only way it would pay off for the time and effort expended. That being said, Adam's freeze dried Pitangatuba looks like it was relatively easy to make. Freeze dried Pitangatuba could be something that ends up in grocery stores (or at least specialty groceries) in the future.

Pitangatuba, in any format, will not be in any store.  Outside of collectors, its not widely known.  Its not a feasible cash crop and too delicate to transport for selling whole or to a processing plant.

With that being said,  both of Adam's freeze dried fruit look delish and worth the money they are fetching.

I think that is an ignorant, narrow-minded statement. At one time, most of the fruit that we all enjoy on this forum was not widely known in the US, outside of collectors. Go ask someone living in the US (outside of Florida) a century ago, "What is a mango?" Go ask someone living in the US fifty years ago, "What is a kiwi?" Go ask someone twenty years ago, "What is a jackfruit," or "what is a mamey sapote," or "what is a rambutan" or about any number of tropical fruits that can now be found in supermarkets throughout the US today?

Pitangatuba has an interesting flavor. It has an interesting shape. Adam Shafran's name for it, starcherry, has a nice ring to it. It is probably too delicate and perishable for fresh fruit sales, though grapes and most berries are not exactly robust fruits. But, freeze drying and other processing methods could open up new possibilities for making Pitangatuba a viable agricultural crop and a presence in groceries stories across the US. Right now, 99.9% of Americans have never heard of Pitangatuba. In ten or twenty years, that could change with the presence of bags of dried starcherries next to dried cranberries and trail mix in grocery stories from coast to coast.

He's probably actually right but I will say there is still always room for improvement within any species. And there are many other factors involved to whether a fruit makes it commercially or becomes commonplace in any aspect.

And most Americans probably don't eat very much of what should be considered healthy food in the first place. And the price of the product would probably be high, so even less consumers.. and so on..

I agree that most Americans eat quite poorly. However, even if, say 75% of all Americans eat completely unhealthy garbage and nothing else (an exaggeration, to be fair), that would still leave 80 million Americans who do eat healthy foods such as fruit. That is a good-sized customer base with which to try and build an interest in Pitangatubas. Not that one would try and instantly create a national market for Pitangatubas. But, I think local interest could be drummed up in South Florida, Southern California, New York City, and maybe a couple of other places where there are large numbers of people with adventurous palates and disposable income. If those test markets become successful, then after a few years expand to a few more places. If successful, keep expanding. If not, stop. I am not saying Pitangatubas will replace apples in the produce section, but I think they could have potential as a specialty fruit or dried fruit product.

At the end of the day would it be worth it to plant orchards of these and pay for water, fertilizer, maintenance, labor, taxes, electricity, marketing etc with an unknown consumer base.. perhaps.. I agree it would be awesome to get these varieties out there. But there are other obscure fruits that may be more productive, easier to grow, better handling, unit price
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: W. on July 15, 2021, 07:36:22 PM
It looks like freeze drying jaboticaba pulp would be an arduous, time-consuming process. I think getting $30-40 per jar would probably be the only way it would pay off for the time and effort expended. That being said, Adam's freeze dried Pitangatuba looks like it was relatively easy to make. Freeze dried Pitangatuba could be something that ends up in grocery stores (or at least specialty groceries) in the future.

Pitangatuba, in any format, will not be in any store.  Outside of collectors, its not widely known.  Its not a feasible cash crop and too delicate to transport for selling whole or to a processing plant.

With that being said,  both of Adam's freeze dried fruit look delish and worth the money they are fetching.

I think that is an ignorant, narrow-minded statement. At one time, most of the fruit that we all enjoy on this forum was not widely known in the US, outside of collectors. Go ask someone living in the US (outside of Florida) a century ago, "What is a mango?" Go ask someone living in the US fifty years ago, "What is a kiwi?" Go ask someone twenty years ago, "What is a jackfruit," or "what is a mamey sapote," or "what is a rambutan" or about any number of tropical fruits that can now be found in supermarkets throughout the US today?

Pitangatuba has an interesting flavor. It has an interesting shape. Adam Shafran's name for it, starcherry, has a nice ring to it. It is probably too delicate and perishable for fresh fruit sales, though grapes and most berries are not exactly robust fruits. But, freeze drying and other processing methods could open up new possibilities for making Pitangatuba a viable agricultural crop and a presence in groceries stories across the US. Right now, 99.9% of Americans have never heard of Pitangatuba. In ten or twenty years, that could change with the presence of bags of dried starcherries next to dried cranberries and trail mix in grocery stories from coast to coast.

He's probably actually right but I will say there is still always room for improvement within any species. And there are many other factors involved to whether a fruit makes it commercially or becomes commonplace in any aspect.

And most Americans probably don't eat very much of what should be considered healthy food in the first place. And the price of the product would probably be high, so even less consumers.. and so on..

I agree that most Americans eat quite poorly. However, even if, say 75% of all Americans eat completely unhealthy garbage and nothing else (an exaggeration, to be fair), that would still leave 80 million Americans who do eat healthy foods such as fruit. That is a good-sized customer base with which to try and build an interest in Pitangatubas. Not that one would try and instantly create a national market for Pitangatubas. But, I think local interest could be drummed up in South Florida, Southern California, New York City, and maybe a couple of other places where there are large numbers of people with adventurous palates and disposable income. If those test markets become successful, then after a few years expand to a few more places. If successful, keep expanding. If not, stop. I am not saying Pitangatubas will replace apples in the produce section, but I think they could have potential as a specialty fruit or dried fruit product.

At the end of the day would it be worth it to plant orchards of these and pay for water, fertilizer, maintenance, labor, taxes, electricity, marketing etc with an unknown consumer base.. perhaps.. I agree it would be awesome to get these varieties out there. But there are other obscure fruits that may be more productive, easier to grow, better handling, unit price

I agree with you that it would be a bit of risky proposition to do a large-scale planting of Pitangatubas for commercial sale. That being said, it fruits at a small size and in three years, though the fruit production is not particularly high until the plants get older and larger and never particularly high compared to some other fruits. People like Adam, who already have many Pitangatubas, can test the market with what they have planted. If they are successful, maybe we will see some other people plant a few acres of Pitangatubas for commercial production.
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: 850FL on July 16, 2021, 12:51:20 PM
Location, demographics, cultural diversity, other issues concerning where it could be marketed successfully..
Now, if the govt were to subsidize growers to grow it commercially as a vitamin/mineral-dense minor crop (maybe as an initiative to get ppl to eat healthier) or something along those lines or even as a source of vitamin (__) as in the case of acerola back in the day then maybe so.. Id be all for it!!
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on July 16, 2021, 02:36:02 PM
This meme is used to quell heated rare fruit debates....

http://youtu.be/hRFjUZN3tSE (http://youtu.be/hRFjUZN3tSE)
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: BonsaiBeast on July 16, 2021, 04:23:14 PM
Can we ban bsbullie?
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: bsbullie on July 16, 2021, 08:07:00 PM
Can we ban bsbullie?

Can we ban you?

Have you ever grown pitangatuba?  Seen ripe fruit?  Know its texture and fragility of it when ripe?  Jyst how would it lend itself to a commercial market (I am not even going to discuss the masses do not support fruit if this tartness)?  Do you even know what you are talking about or just spewing garbage?

Comparing it mango is ludicrous.

If you want to go at it, just be prepared. .
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: BonsaiBeast on July 16, 2021, 08:52:21 PM
Can we ban bsbullie?

Can we ban you?

Have you ever grown pitangatuba?  Seen ripe fruit?  Know its texture and fragility of it when ripe?  Jyst how would it lend itself to a commercial market (I am not even going to discuss the masses do not support fruit if this tartness)?  Do you even know what you are talking about or just spewing garbage?

Comparing it mango is ludicrous.

If you want to go at it, just be prepared. .

I just dont get why you can't make a point without insulting people. You realize this is a hobby for most people?
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: W. on July 17, 2021, 12:15:49 AM
This meme is used to quell heated rare fruit debates....

http://youtu.be/hRFjUZN3tSE (http://youtu.be/hRFjUZN3tSE)

What fruit was Andrew Zimmern eating that made him react like that? I watched his Appalachian episode, and he did not react that strongly to eating raccoon and possum brains.
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: vnomonee on July 17, 2021, 01:00:23 AM
think it was durian
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on July 17, 2021, 05:26:21 PM
think it was durian

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5V5mWjOzkgk (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5V5mWjOzkgk)
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: W. on July 17, 2021, 05:53:01 PM
think it was durian

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5V5mWjOzkgk (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5V5mWjOzkgk)

I guess I should have known it was durian.
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: W. on July 17, 2021, 06:15:14 PM
Can we ban bsbullie?

Can we ban you?

Have you ever grown pitangatuba?  Seen ripe fruit?  Know its texture and fragility of it when ripe?  Jyst how would it lend itself to a commercial market (I am not even going to discuss the masses do not support fruit if this tartness)?  Do you even know what you are talking about or just spewing garbage?

Comparing it mango is ludicrous.

If you want to go at it, just be prepared. .

I just dont get why you can't make a point without insulting people. You realize this is a hobby for most people?

I think that bsbullie has stated his opinion, in his own inimitable, ill-tempered way, and should be allowed to do so no matter whether I believe it is narrow-minded and ignorant and put forth in a poorly-written and crass manner, just as I have stated an opinion on this Forum which he obviously does not agree with. Bsbullie's bullying and disagreeable attitude on this issue is not going to lessen my belief that Pitangatubas could make an interesting potential commercial crop. His attitude has not prevented me from putting forth my opinion, nor engaging in a friendly debate with 850FL about it. Other Forum users can read this thread and decide who has made the better point, 850FL or me (or possibly bsbullie). But, I think at this point, on this issue, further engaging with the site's resident bully really serves no purpose except to waste time.
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: FRUITBOXHERO on July 17, 2021, 10:02:02 PM
Can we ban bsbullie?

Can we ban you?

Have you ever grown pitangatuba?  Seen ripe fruit?  Know its texture and fragility of it when ripe?  Jyst how would it lend itself to a commercial market (I am not even going to discuss the masses do not support fruit if this tartness)?  Do you even know what you are talking about or just spewing garbage?

Comparing it mango is ludicrous.

If you want to go at it, just be prepared. .



bsbullie for the win!...... watch out W. you fixin to be schooled, boy
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: 850FL on July 18, 2021, 10:05:55 AM
Pitangatuba does have an interesting look but is it destined for the loquat dooryard fate (lol)
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: driftwood on July 18, 2021, 10:22:28 AM
Nobody needs banned but seriously let's grow up a bit. People will argue about literally anything. Just chill out
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: TheGivingTree on July 18, 2021, 11:06:54 AM
W, I share your enthusiasm of bringing new fruits to market and enjoy most sour fruits, but the masses will struggle to adopt a sour fruit choice in place of other similar exotic choices like star fruit. Unless they contain exorbitant amounts of a certain vitamin, purchasing dried or frozen pitangatuba may not strike fire in the hearts of many.

I tried to preserve some pitangatubas in small quail egg containers to no avail. They rapidly degrade. 2-3 days is the max I could keep them before becoming overripe.

I haven't tried to dehydrate yet but will be giving that a go.
I'm inclined to believe there is potential for a small specialty market. If juiced, the taste is quite unique. Profitable, not so much unless you can get a contract for McDs new star cherry siracha burger!
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: W. on July 18, 2021, 04:45:03 PM
W, I share your enthusiasm of bringing new fruits to market and enjoy most sour fruits, but the masses will struggle to adopt a sour fruit choice in place of other similar exotic choices like star fruit. Unless they contain exorbitant amounts of a certain vitamin, purchasing dried or frozen pitangatuba may not strike fire in the hearts of many.

I tried to preserve some pitangatubas in small quail egg containers to no avail. They rapidly degrade. 2-3 days is the max I could keep them before becoming overripe.

I haven't tried to dehydrate yet but will be giving that a go.
I'm inclined to believe there is potential for a small specialty market. If juiced, the taste is quite unique. Profitable, not so much unless you can get a contract for McDs new star cherry siracha burger!

Until I saw Adam's freeze dried Pitangatubas, I had not thought of it as having any potential other than as a backyard fruit for rare fruit growers like us. Now, I think it has potential as a dried fruit. I am not as bullish on its prospects as a fresh fruit, for the reasons you laid out; though, with all the seedlings being propagated and planted, maybe a few of them will have the genetics for better keeping fruit.
Title: Re: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!
Post by: FlyingFoxFruits on July 18, 2021, 07:58:29 PM
W, I share your enthusiasm of bringing new fruits to market and enjoy most sour fruits, but the masses will struggle to adopt a sour fruit choice in place of other similar exotic choices like star fruit. Unless they contain exorbitant amounts of a certain vitamin, purchasing dried or frozen pitangatuba may not strike fire in the hearts of many.

I tried to preserve some pitangatubas in small quail egg containers to no avail. They rapidly degrade. 2-3 days is the max I could keep them before becoming overripe.

I haven't tried to dehydrate yet but will be giving that a go.
I'm inclined to believe there is potential for a small specialty market. If juiced, the taste is quite unique. Profitable, not so much unless you can get a contract for McDs new star cherry siracha burger!

Until I saw Adam's freeze dried Pitangatubas, I had not thought of it as having any potential other than as a backyard fruit for rare fruit growers like us. Now, I think it has potential as a dried fruit. I am not as bullish on its prospects as a fresh fruit, for the reasons you laid out; though, with all the seedlings being propagated and planted, maybe a few of them will have the genetics for better keeping fruit.

it's a lot like growing a tomato, and the final product is like a passion fruit...it would sell best as a frozen pulp...

but ya'll didn't need me to tell you that....