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Messages - Polypterus

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1
If you're still looking for kratom, send D-grower a message. I know he's sold fresh seeds in the past.

2
For anything larger than seeds or seedlings, I tend to go with UPS for this reason. They're generally cheaper for larger packages, and usually always handle them better.

I once had a family member send me a valuable coin in an envelope as a gift, and when I received the envelope, it was slit open and the coin was missing. I've seen the same thing happen with prescription medication, they'll slit open the package and peek inside to see if it's something they want.

3
Just got my sugar apple seedling in the mail from W, I strongly doubt I could have gotten a better plant for the price. Exceptional packaging, shipping time, and quality plant.

4
PM

5
Ackee might be worth looking for, from what I've heard it's very common in Jamaica.

6
Got my seeds a while back, and just wanted to say how impressed I am with them. I ordered 5 Annona rugulosa seeds expecting only 1-3 of them to sprout, but all of them have germinated. These are probably the best annona seeds I've ordered. The jabo and myrcia seeds I bought are also just now sprouting and are very vigorous. You definitely can't go wrong ordering from BellamyTrees.

7
I think it may be too late to graft pawpaw. It should be done when the root stock is just putting out leaves the size of a squirrels ear. This is usually in March or April.
Good to know, I'll try again next year. My tree is leafing out late, but I forget that scion wood has already leafed out. Thanks for the tip.

8
Any chance you'd be willing to send out the feijoa seedlings for the cost of shipping? I didn't have any luck trying to grow them from cuttings.

9
I recently picked up an 8' tree, and I'm looking to make it a cocktail tree so I can get fruit sooner/on a single tree. Given that, I'd like to get 4-6 total scions from various varieties. I'm not too picky about what varieties they are, as long as it's a good mix, maybe 1-2 of each.

10
Posting to tropical buy/sell instead, please delete.

11
I recently picked up an 8' seedling tree, and I'm looking to make it a cocktail tree so I can get fruit sooner/on a single tree. Given that, I'd like 4-6 total scions from various varieties. I'm not too picky about what varieties they are, as long as it's a good mix, maybe 1-2 of each.

12
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: WTB Annona dioica seeds
« on: May 06, 2022, 07:34:23 AM »
Easier to find scions and graft to an easier to find Annona.
I donít think this oneís been fruited in the US before.
I had a big one grafted on Cherimoya but gave it away.
Probably going to require the pollen collection at night and pollinate in the morning like other Annona.
I had no idea it was so tough to fruit, although hand pollinating won't be an issue for me. I just found it appealing because it makes large fruit and stays compact. Scions would work too if I could find them, I'll just have to buy some rootstock from someone as I just grafted everything I have on hand at the moment.

13
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / WTB Annona dioica seeds
« on: May 04, 2022, 10:24:16 PM »
Looking to buy a handful of dioica seeds.

14
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Wild Annona from Dominican Republic
« on: May 04, 2022, 09:03:57 PM »
I'm at an absolute loss. Looks like glabra to me.

15
I'm in a fairly similar boat as you are. Just a little further south in 8a, and a year or two ahead of you.

I started collecting and growing these plants during my senior year of high school, and it all started with just some peppers, tomatoes, and a blueberry bush. After I discovered I could buy mango and guava seedlings off ebay, into the rabbit hole I went. I bought a lot of 3 gallon trees that year, almost entirely cherimoya, atemoya, and sugar apple. Three flowered, two set fruit, but for a number of reasons, they dropped them after a few months. Now that I better know what I'm doing, hopefully this will be the year.

There were a number of times where I considered cutting my losses where I'm at now and giving up. I bought $40 worth of african annona seeds, none of them germinated, and to add insult to injury, the cats used the pots as litter boxes. The other thing I constantly wonder is, when is it enough? Between audio, custom keyboards, computers, and aquariums, when should I stop funneling money into this and focus more on those hobbies? Am I even going to be able to care for the plants I have now come 3-5 years, much less the ones I plan to buy? I'm sure everyone has had set backs in this hobby, doubts enter their mind, moments where they asked themselves "is it worth it?", but I find it's best to focus on the good.

My doctor white cherimoya is a solid 4-5 ft with a 1 inch trunk, I'll be damned if it doesn't flower and set fruit this year. I know it's ready. My booth, AP, and sugar apple are all right behind it too, so worst case scenario, it'll be next year. That comes quicker than you'd think. In place of those african annonas, I now have A. vepretorum and A. monticola seeds that just recently sprouted and are growing like weeds; I'd be astonished if I managed to kill them with the level of vigor they're showing. My mangos are also finally putting out new growth, and they're growing quicker than probably any plant I've ever owned. I swear a branch on my Carrie grew half an inch just overnight. There's other things to look forward too as well, like whether my psidium longipetiolum will actually survive my 8a winters once it gets large enough to go in ground. With reports of it surviving 14-19 f, it seems promising. So even if my cats insist on killing a quarter of my plants, I have reasons to keep going.

With as many setbacks as you may face in this hobby, it's best to look at what you've accomplished, and what you will accomplish. Think of all the fruit that you've gotten to try that would otherwise have been unavailable to you. Think of everything you've learned along the way, and the people you've met on this forum, I know I'm certainly thankful for that.

Another thing to keep in mind is that you may have some things available to you in Tennessee that others may not. For example, I wanted to keep freshwater stingrays for the longest time, but they're illegal in Georgia. I even looked into getting a permit to keep them, but the amount of hoops you have to jump through just makes it not worth it. They're also illegal in Florida, California, and Texas, all states where you can grow a lot of these tropical fruits, but they're not illegal in Tennessee. Now, I doubt you'll go buy a 400 gallon aquarium tomorrow to go keep stingrays, but my point is that you may be able to do some things in Tennessee that people in those warmer states may not be able to do.
I've been into the aquascaping hobby a bit cause of my friends, but gave up on it after seeing that plants are better.
I've faced a lot of losses so far. For example, take the yangmei. I participated in 2 group orders, and didn't get a single tree to survive. I spent 100's of dollars trying to get those things to grow. But I still persisted and now have 3 trees that are alive and well. If I stopped I would never had succeeded. I'm glad the psidium I gave you is doing well. I heard they are cold tolerant to 15, but I brought mine out in 32 degree weather and it got beat up.
There are setbacks, but at least for the most part 98% of what I have grows here, maybe just at a slower rate.
I don't plan to let that psidium see cold weather until it gets a solid 0.5-1 inch trunk on it. Losses are just going to be a part of this hobby. I can't tell you how many hundreds in dollars of rare fish I've lost, and it tore me up every time. Always due to freak accidents too, fish gets sucked into the filter, the water I used for a water change was a few degrees too cold, some random disease gets introduced into the tank that I don't have medication on hand for. I assumed some of the same losses would happen when I started this hobby.

Also, I wouldn't entirely give up on annonas quite yet. It might just be the species you're growing, the seeds you're using, or the soil you're using. I'm sure you can get at least one species to work for you. Pawpaws might also be of interest to you, since they're the closest relative we have to annonas in a temperate climate.

16
I bought $40 worth of african annona seeds, none of them germinated, and to add insult to injury, the cats used the pots as litter boxes.
Me too! Those african annona seeds on etsy looked so good. But nothing germinated. And my cats love using my pots as litter boxes. I cut cardboard and put it over the top of them all! Time to toss the cats and keep the plants
I'll have to try that when this winter rolls around. I was initially thinking about a layer of lava rock on top of the soil, as I've read cats don't like to walk on it, but the cardboard seems like it would be better for more delicate seedlings.

17
I'm in a fairly similar boat as you are. Just a little further south in 8a, and a year or two ahead of you.

I started collecting and growing these plants during my senior year of high school, and it all started with just some peppers, tomatoes, and a blueberry bush. After I discovered I could buy mango and guava seedlings off ebay, into the rabbit hole I went. I bought a lot of 3 gallon trees that year, almost entirely cherimoya, atemoya, and sugar apple. Three flowered, two set fruit, but for a number of reasons, they dropped them after a few months. Now that I better know what I'm doing, hopefully this will be the year.

There were a number of times where I considered cutting my losses where I'm at now and giving up. I bought $40 worth of african annona seeds, none of them germinated, and to add insult to injury, the cats used the pots as litter boxes. The other thing I constantly wonder is, when is it enough? Between audio, custom keyboards, computers, and aquariums, when should I stop funneling money into this and focus more on those hobbies? Am I even going to be able to care for the plants I have now come 3-5 years, much less the ones I plan to buy? I'm sure everyone has had set backs in this hobby, doubts enter their mind, moments where they asked themselves "is it worth it?", but I find it's best to focus on the good.

My doctor white cherimoya is a solid 4-5 ft with a 1 inch trunk, I'll be damned if it doesn't flower and set fruit this year. I know it's ready. My booth, AP, and sugar apple are all right behind it too, so worst case scenario, it'll be next year. That comes quicker than you'd think. In place of those african annonas, I now have A. vepretorum and A. monticola seeds that just recently sprouted and are growing like weeds; I'd be astonished if I managed to kill them with the level of vigor they're showing. My mangos are also finally putting out new growth, and they're growing quicker than probably any plant I've ever owned. I swear a branch on my Carrie grew half an inch just overnight. There's other things to look forward too as well, like whether my psidium longipetiolum will actually survive my 8a winters once it gets large enough to go in ground. With reports of it surviving 14-19 f, it seems promising. So even if my cats insist on killing a quarter of my plants, I have reasons to keep going.

With as many setbacks as you may face in this hobby, it's best to look at what you've accomplished, and what you will accomplish. Think of all the fruit that you've gotten to try that would otherwise have been unavailable to you. Think of everything you've learned along the way, and the people you've met on this forum, I know I'm certainly thankful for that.

Another thing to keep in mind is that you may have some things available to you in Tennessee that others may not. For example, I wanted to keep freshwater stingrays for the longest time, but they're illegal in Georgia. I even looked into getting a permit to keep them, but the amount of hoops you have to jump through just makes it not worth it. They're also illegal in Florida, California, and Texas, all states where you can grow a lot of these tropical fruits, but they're not illegal in Tennessee. Now, I doubt you'll go buy a 400 gallon aquarium tomorrow to go keep stingrays, but my point is that you may be able to do some things in Tennessee that people in those warmer states may not be able to do.

18
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Seeds for sale
« on: April 23, 2022, 05:35:36 PM »
Grimal seeds just arrived in good shape, and an extra was included. Highly recommend this seller!

19
I would definitely be interested in a couple seeds once you get them germinated.

20
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Re: Seedling ID
« on: April 10, 2022, 08:52:06 PM »
That's C. guazumifolia. I have a similar seedling right now
It's interesting that it took it that long to germinate, as I got the seeds last august, but I'm still happy it sprouted regardless. Thanks for the help!

21
Tropical Fruit Discussion / Seedling ID
« on: April 10, 2022, 04:01:50 PM »
Does anyone know what this seedling is? A few months ago I put my a. monticola seeds into what I thought were empty pots, but a couple weeks ago this popped up. The only thing I think it could be is C. guazumifolia, but none of my other guazumifolia seeds sprouted, so I have no way to compare it to know for sure.








22
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: Group Seed Order from BRAZIL # 2
« on: January 15, 2022, 10:52:31 PM »
Just got my seeds this evening, and everything looks good. Two of my monticolas even came germinated, which I'm very happy about.

Thanks again to Satya for making this happen.

23
Tropical Fruit Discussion / My First Cherimoya Fruit
« on: December 23, 2021, 09:03:44 PM »
I just got into this tropical fruit growing hobby this spring, and a lot of my trees I purchased as grafted 3 gallon plants. A couple of these were already flowering this summer, so I had a booth cherimoya and AP atemoya set fruit around August. For whatever reason the fruit on my booth dropped a couple of days ago, not sure if I overwatered or overfertilized it, as I think 4 months is slightly premature for this plant. Regardless, I sat it out on the counter and it ripened within a couple of days. I gave it a taste, and while it did taste like cherimoya, I wasn't very impressed. A touch bitter and overall not very sweet. Very seedy and little flesh. My trees are larger now and I know more about what I'm doing, so I'm hoping that I'll have better luck with my next harvest.






24
1) They knock over and dig in pots

2) They dig up and eat seeds

3) That stupid smug face

25
Tropical Fruit Buy, Sell & Trade / Re: New brazilian seller seeds
« on: December 09, 2021, 10:53:12 AM »
I'd be interested in annona and duguetia seeds, depending on what species you have.

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