Author Topic: Temple Oranges  (Read 3924 times)

Millet

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Temple Oranges
« on: February 28, 2015, 09:39:17 PM »
I purchased two Temple Oranges today.  They were moderately easy to peel, but with a lot of seeds.  One fruit had 22 seeds, and the second had 25 seeds. All seeds were quite large in size. I found the fruit's interesting mild low acid taste to be an entreating with a  complex tarter flavor.  Far juicer than any other variety orange . I decided to plant the seed (18 of them), mostly because they do not come true, so the resulting tree will be a one of a kind variety never seen before.   I will chose the best seedling of the bunch to grown on.  Will be an adventure. Will up date this thread from time to time with the results. If you have not tried a Temple Orange before I encourage you to purchase some and tell us what you think. - Millet
« Last Edit: February 28, 2015, 09:50:14 PM by Millet »

fruitlovers

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Re: Temple Oranges
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2015, 09:43:31 PM »
I purchased two Temple Oranges today.  They were moderately easy to peel, but with a lot of seeds.  One fruit had 22 seeds, and the second had 25 seeds. All seeds were quite large in size. I found the fruit's interesting mild low acid taste to be entreating.   I decided to plant the seed (18 of them), mostly because they do not come true, so the resulting tree will be a one of a kind variety never seen before.   I will chose the best seedling of the bunch to grown on.  Will be an adventure. Will up date this thread from time to time with the results. - Millet

Temples are called oranges, but are really tangors: tangerine X orange. I have a couple of trees. They're very productive and stay rather small. We like them a lot, both for eating out of hand and juicing. Added appeal is that they are easy to peel.
Oscar

Mike T

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Re: Temple Oranges
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2015, 09:54:47 PM »
They are pretty scarce here and always called temple tangor. Honey murcots  are tangors as well but always referred to as mandarins.

fruitlovers

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Re: Temple Oranges
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2015, 12:12:04 AM »
They are pretty scarce here and always called temple tangor. Honey murcots  are tangors as well but always referred to as mandarins.

Both Honey Murcott and Temple Orange grow well here. The Honey Murcott is a much larger tree. The Temple is fairly dwarf by comparison.
Oscar

Mike T

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Re: Temple Oranges
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2015, 01:01:45 AM »
My honey murcot is a powerhouse pumping out the fruit which ripen right through winter.It wants to be big but gets robust pruning.I lose many to cockatoos.

bsbullie

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Re: Temple Oranges
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2015, 09:31:08 AM »
Temples are possibly the best tasting "orange " there is,  especially for juicing.   Many years ago it was the common juicing orange commercially grown and sold in Florida.   Then when people decided making profits, at the sacrifice of quality,  it was faded out and replaced by other varieties due to its short shelf life.   

Samecas was done with tomatoes,  corn and many other fruits and vegetables.
- Rob

mrtexas

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Re: Temple Oranges
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2015, 01:14:56 PM »
Temples and Minneolas were my favorites when I lived in Indian River country from 1969-1973. Yumm. Both pretty late however like
after New Years day. Should have tried growing temples here in Texas but never have as they are quite late.

Millet

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Re: Temple Oranges
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2015, 02:55:07 PM »
The temple has a pockmarked history. A variety of tangor, a cross between the mandarin orange and the sweet orange, it is believed to have come from the West Indies early in the 20th century to Florida, where it was named for William Chase Temple, a prominent citrus grower and an owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates. - Millet

RyanL

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Re: Temple Oranges
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2015, 04:44:17 PM »
My Observation about a Florida Temple sampled in January - some seeds, sweet, tangy, faintly spicy aroma & flavor, aromatic, some tangerine notes, Faint spicy aftertaste, hard to describe. Very Juicy not firm texture. Thin dark orange rind & light orange internal color. Somewhat tough segment connections. Unique flavor very good

fruitlovers

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Re: Temple Oranges
« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2015, 06:02:51 PM »
My Observation about a Florida Temple sampled in January - some seeds, sweet, tangy, faintly spicy aroma & flavor, aromatic, some tangerine notes, Faint spicy aftertaste, hard to describe. Very Juicy not firm texture. Thin dark orange rind & light orange internal color. Somewhat tough segment connections. Unique flavor very good

good description. I would just add that seeds are fairly large and the exterior skin is unusually bumpy. Also tree is dwarfish.
Oscar

Millet

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Re: Temple Oranges
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2015, 08:44:50 PM »
Today March 5, the first "Temple Orange " seedling (1st of 18) germinated and is showing above the soil.   It took only 5 days to germinate.  Peeling off the testa (hard seed coating) really helps in quicker germination - Millet

FruitFreak

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Re: Temple Oranges
« Reply #11 on: April 16, 2015, 09:53:50 PM »
Would a Temple make it in Orlando?
- Marley

Viking Guy

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Re: Temple Oranges
« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2015, 10:06:07 PM »
Yes, of course.

Ortanique and King are my favorites of the Tangors.

gunnar429

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Re: Temple Oranges
« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2015, 06:02:26 AM »
Also, Temple is a very good pollinator for other citrus.
~Jeff

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