Author Topic: Check out what Freeze Dried Jaboticaba Pulp Looks Like! Imagine the Taste!  (Read 2429 times)

W.

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 488
    • United States, Alabama, 7b
    • View Profile
This meme is used to quell heated rare fruit debates....

http://youtu.be/hRFjUZN3tSE

What fruit was Andrew Zimmern eating that made him react like that? I watched his Appalachian episode, and he did not react that strongly to eating raccoon and possum brains.

vnomonee

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 220
    • Zone 7a northeastern NJ
    • View Profile
think it was durian

FlyingFoxFruits

  • Prince of Plinia
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12542
  • www.FlyingFoxFruits.com
    • USA, FEMA Region IV, FL Zone 9a
    • View Profile
    • Flying Fox Fruits
www.FlyingFoxFruits.com

www.PLINIAS.com

https://www.ebay.com/usr/flyingfoxfruits

www.youtube.com/FlyingFoxFruits

I disabled the forum's personal messaging system, please send an email to contact me, FlyingFoxFruits@gmail.com

W.

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 488
    • United States, Alabama, 7b
    • View Profile

W.

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 488
    • United States, Alabama, 7b
    • View Profile
Can we ban bsbullie?

Can we ban you?

Have you ever grown pitangatuba?  Seen ripe fruit?  Know its texture and fragility of it when ripe?  Jyst how would it lend itself to a commercial market (I am not even going to discuss the masses do not support fruit if this tartness)?  Do you even know what you are talking about or just spewing garbage?

Comparing it mango is ludicrous.

If you want to go at it, just be prepared. .

I just dont get why you can't make a point without insulting people. You realize this is a hobby for most people?

I think that bsbullie has stated his opinion, in his own inimitable, ill-tempered way, and should be allowed to do so no matter whether I believe it is narrow-minded and ignorant and put forth in a poorly-written and crass manner, just as I have stated an opinion on this Forum which he obviously does not agree with. Bsbullie's bullying and disagreeable attitude on this issue is not going to lessen my belief that Pitangatubas could make an interesting potential commercial crop. His attitude has not prevented me from putting forth my opinion, nor engaging in a friendly debate with 850FL about it. Other Forum users can read this thread and decide who has made the better point, 850FL or me (or possibly bsbullie). But, I think at this point, on this issue, further engaging with the site's resident bully really serves no purpose except to waste time.

FRUITBOXHERO

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 415
    • Coral Springs Fl
    • View Profile
Can we ban bsbullie?

Can we ban you?

Have you ever grown pitangatuba?  Seen ripe fruit?  Know its texture and fragility of it when ripe?  Jyst how would it lend itself to a commercial market (I am not even going to discuss the masses do not support fruit if this tartness)?  Do you even know what you are talking about or just spewing garbage?

Comparing it mango is ludicrous.

If you want to go at it, just be prepared. .



bsbullie for the win!...... watch out W. you fixin to be schooled, boy
Joe

850FL

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 469
    • zone 8b/9a
    • View Profile
Pitangatuba does have an interesting look but is it destined for the loquat dooryard fate (lol)

driftwood

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 159
  • my name is driftwood, nice to meet you
    • Arizona 9b
    • View Profile
Nobody needs banned but seriously let's grow up a bit. People will argue about literally anything. Just chill out
« Last Edit: July 18, 2021, 10:29:27 AM by driftwood »

TheGivingTree

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 136
    • Florida Zone 10
    • View Profile
W, I share your enthusiasm of bringing new fruits to market and enjoy most sour fruits, but the masses will struggle to adopt a sour fruit choice in place of other similar exotic choices like star fruit. Unless they contain exorbitant amounts of a certain vitamin, purchasing dried or frozen pitangatuba may not strike fire in the hearts of many.

I tried to preserve some pitangatubas in small quail egg containers to no avail. They rapidly degrade. 2-3 days is the max I could keep them before becoming overripe.

I haven't tried to dehydrate yet but will be giving that a go.
I'm inclined to believe there is potential for a small specialty market. If juiced, the taste is quite unique. Profitable, not so much unless you can get a contract for McDs new star cherry siracha burger!

W.

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 488
    • United States, Alabama, 7b
    • View Profile
W, I share your enthusiasm of bringing new fruits to market and enjoy most sour fruits, but the masses will struggle to adopt a sour fruit choice in place of other similar exotic choices like star fruit. Unless they contain exorbitant amounts of a certain vitamin, purchasing dried or frozen pitangatuba may not strike fire in the hearts of many.

I tried to preserve some pitangatubas in small quail egg containers to no avail. They rapidly degrade. 2-3 days is the max I could keep them before becoming overripe.

I haven't tried to dehydrate yet but will be giving that a go.
I'm inclined to believe there is potential for a small specialty market. If juiced, the taste is quite unique. Profitable, not so much unless you can get a contract for McDs new star cherry siracha burger!

Until I saw Adam's freeze dried Pitangatubas, I had not thought of it as having any potential other than as a backyard fruit for rare fruit growers like us. Now, I think it has potential as a dried fruit. I am not as bullish on its prospects as a fresh fruit, for the reasons you laid out; though, with all the seedlings being propagated and planted, maybe a few of them will have the genetics for better keeping fruit.

FlyingFoxFruits

  • Prince of Plinia
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12542
  • www.FlyingFoxFruits.com
    • USA, FEMA Region IV, FL Zone 9a
    • View Profile
    • Flying Fox Fruits
W, I share your enthusiasm of bringing new fruits to market and enjoy most sour fruits, but the masses will struggle to adopt a sour fruit choice in place of other similar exotic choices like star fruit. Unless they contain exorbitant amounts of a certain vitamin, purchasing dried or frozen pitangatuba may not strike fire in the hearts of many.

I tried to preserve some pitangatubas in small quail egg containers to no avail. They rapidly degrade. 2-3 days is the max I could keep them before becoming overripe.

I haven't tried to dehydrate yet but will be giving that a go.
I'm inclined to believe there is potential for a small specialty market. If juiced, the taste is quite unique. Profitable, not so much unless you can get a contract for McDs new star cherry siracha burger!

Until I saw Adam's freeze dried Pitangatubas, I had not thought of it as having any potential other than as a backyard fruit for rare fruit growers like us. Now, I think it has potential as a dried fruit. I am not as bullish on its prospects as a fresh fruit, for the reasons you laid out; though, with all the seedlings being propagated and planted, maybe a few of them will have the genetics for better keeping fruit.

it's a lot like growing a tomato, and the final product is like a passion fruit...it would sell best as a frozen pulp...

but ya'll didn't need me to tell you that....
www.FlyingFoxFruits.com

www.PLINIAS.com

https://www.ebay.com/usr/flyingfoxfruits

www.youtube.com/FlyingFoxFruits

I disabled the forum's personal messaging system, please send an email to contact me, FlyingFoxFruits@gmail.com

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk