Author Topic: Sea weed  (Read 1056 times)

bovine421

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1961
    • Shake Rag Rd Fl 9b
    • View Profile
Sea weed
« on: March 21, 2023, 03:09:17 PM »
« Last Edit: March 21, 2023, 03:12:54 PM by bovine421 »
Tete Nene Julie Juliet Carrie Ice Cream Coconut Cream Little Gem  Dot  Mallika PPK  OS  Pina Colada Cotton Candy Buxton Spice Karen Michelle M-4 Beverly Marc Anthony White Pirie Lychee Cherilata Plantain Barbados Cherry

johnb51

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4767
    • USA Deerfield Beach, FL Zone 11a
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2023, 03:37:31 PM »
I don't why it's suddenly getting so much publicity.  It's been going on for several years now.  I don't find it to be any worse this year than the last couple of years.  Something is feeding this seaweed.  Is it just all the fertilizers washing down the Amazon?  Are they coming from elsewhere?  What are the contributing factors?  A warmer ocean?  The beaches were not like this twenty years ago.
John

Epicatt2

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 861
  • Fruit forest in progress . . .
    • Tampa, FL / Zone 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2023, 07:25:04 PM »
Wondering if anyone who's nearby close enough to collect some of this seaweed that is washing up on the shore here and there has taken the opportunity to collect some to use as feritilizer?

I've heard that some back-to-the-landers in Florida were doing that a several decades ago.  They collected it as it washed up, rinsed the salt out of it, composted it, and turned it into the soil as free food for their veggie gardens.

It probably should be suitable for some fruit trees once it's composted.

Just pondering . . . .

Paul M.
==

johnb51

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4767
    • USA Deerfield Beach, FL Zone 11a
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2023, 08:26:18 PM »
Wondering if anyone who's nearby close enough to collect some of this seaweed that is washing up on the shore here and there has taken the opportunity to collect some to use as feritilizer?

I've heard that some back-to-the-landers in Florida were doing that a several decades ago.  They collected it as it washed up, rinsed the salt out of it, composted it, and turned it into the soil as free food for their veggie gardens.

It probably should be suitable for some fruit trees once it's composted.

Just pondering . . . .

Paul M.
==
I was at Truly Tropical not too long ago, and the young man who was at the sales table said that Chris does collect this seaweed to spread around her trees.
John

Rispa

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 267
    • Houston, TX
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2023, 08:28:44 PM »
If you go first thing in the morning when tide is going out you can collect critters from the seaweed for aquariums. Like sargasm fish, seahorses, and starfish. You can do the same after storms

kapps

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 165
    • Florida, Zone 10A
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2023, 08:47:32 PM »
I had heard that the seaweed has high levels of arsenic and it wasn’t recommended to use it as fertilizer.

Gulfgardener

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 106
    • Panhandle 9a
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2023, 08:42:01 AM »
I thought about doing the same last year. I guess I'll pass lol.  Here is an article talking about the heavy metals https://dcnanature.org/sargassum-fertilizer/

JakeFruit

  • Mod Emeritus
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 661
  • FL Gulf Coast Fruit Lover Spam Fighter
    • zone 10A
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2023, 08:47:03 AM »
Wonder what the seaweed will do to this awful Red Tide.... it's lasted all winter this year.

Stomata

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 150
    • Sarasota Florida. 9b
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2023, 09:41:05 AM »
I go with the gracilaria sp that are common on the florida coast as a source of freely available fertility. I believe they have lower loads of toxins. Also this may have been mentioned on here before, but there is some research showing seaweed improved plant cold tolerance.

roblack

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2978
    • Miami, FL 11A
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2023, 01:18:40 PM »
Adding kelp to livestock feed reduces flatulence. Seaweed good for many things.

pagnr

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 941
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2023, 04:08:40 PM »
Bull Kelp is a deep water cold species that contains high levels of plant growth stimulants. The live plants grow tall quickly to reach the light.
Apart from the other minerals it contains, the plant growth stimulants make it an useful "fertiliser".

bovine421

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1961
    • Shake Rag Rd Fl 9b
    • View Profile
Tete Nene Julie Juliet Carrie Ice Cream Coconut Cream Little Gem  Dot  Mallika PPK  OS  Pina Colada Cotton Candy Buxton Spice Karen Michelle M-4 Beverly Marc Anthony White Pirie Lychee Cherilata Plantain Barbados Cherry

johnb51

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4767
    • USA Deerfield Beach, FL Zone 11a
    • View Profile
John

vall

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 112
    • Treasure Coast
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #13 on: May 23, 2023, 11:58:55 AM »
Treasure Coast RFC had a speaker this month who was involved in the composting sargassum study (Dr. Vincent Encomio). His slides aren't available, but he emphasized that no, sargassum is not safe to use on food crops (or as livestock feed) due to the arsenic content. The level of arsenic drops after composting but they don't know it if simply leaches into the ground.
- Val

palmcity

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 821
    • Martin County, Fl zone10a
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #14 on: May 23, 2023, 08:48:07 PM »
Poisoning Fear, panic, etc. etc. etc.   
Take it with a grain of Salt..

Google foods that contain Arsenic and decide if you really want to eliminate them all from your diet, also many nuts, etc. etc. etc.

You are unlikely to find anyone paid by government, universities, etc. to tell you anything other than it can or might accumulate with prolonged ingestion/contact/etc. and can eventually in High amounts in the body cause ... death.

But many other common minerals/metals in vitamins taken daily can also be toxic if in too high amounts in the body...
Googled:::

 "
What metals build up in the body?
Disease Overview

Many of the heavy metals, such as zinc, copper, chromium, iron and manganese, are essential to body function in very small amounts. But, if these metals accumulate in the body in concentrations sufficient to cause poisoning, then serious damage may occur.

Moderation in everything as too little or too much of many many things can kill these carbon based bodies... lol

The carbon atom is the essential building block of life. Every part of your body is made up of chains of carbon atoms, which is why we are known as "carbon-based life-forms." Chemically, we're just a bunch of inert compounds.Feb 6, 2015

Decrease the worrying... It'll come .... eventually...

Be thankful and enjoy each day as I'm sure most of us do...



Greater Good

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 206
    • Coral Gables, Florida Zone 11A
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2023, 03:18:55 PM »
Wondering if anyone who's nearby close enough to collect some of this seaweed that is washing up on the shore here and there has taken the opportunity to collect some to use as feritilizer?

I've heard that some back-to-the-landers in Florida were doing that a several decades ago.  They collected it as it washed up, rinsed the salt out of it, composted it, and turned it into the soil as free food for their veggie gardens.

It probably should be suitable for some fruit trees once it's composted.

Just pondering . . . .

Paul M.
==

Proper composting would be the key. In an organically grown garden, trees don't take up what the microbes don't supply.

pineislander

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2189
    • Bokeelia, FL
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2023, 04:57:56 PM »
There is some evidence that iron from Saharan dust is part of the reason for proliferation. In the ocean, iron is often a limiting nutrient.
http://railsback.org/Fundamentals/SFMGFeasnutrient02.pdf

Back in the 90's some were proposing a scheme to use the great Southern Ocean where hardly anybody goes as a giant carbon sink to absorb CO2 just by spreading iron in the sea down there. It might make more sense than many proposals currently in vogue. You could turn it off very quickly by stopping if negative concerns came about.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2023, 05:07:31 PM by pineislander »

1rainman

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 461
    • Florida
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #17 on: May 24, 2023, 06:32:19 PM »
I thought seaweed was a super food. It's commonly eaten in Asia. I like seaweed soup. I don't know which ones are edible and which aren't. Then there's the algae super food you can buy capsules of it. It actually absorbs heavy metals when you eat it then you poop out some of the toxic metals. Seawater itself is really good fertilizer if you dilute it enough. The salts and everything has a lot of micro nutrients (only a small amount needed but often lacking in places). I thought arsenic is naturally occurring in low doses in a lot of things too.

I get plants to grow like crazy usually just with good soil and a little fertilizer that you mix with water.

In Florida there's so much fertilizer running into lake okochobee and waterways we have massive algae blooms not all the time but pretty often that used to be super rare 30 years ago.

And also the sewage is a super fertilizer a lot of sewage from boats and stuff goes into the harbor.

Fruit Jungle

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 102
    • Loxahatchee, Florida Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Sea weed
« Reply #18 on: May 24, 2023, 08:30:45 PM »
According to this study the vegetables grown in sargassum compost had significantly higher arsenic and cadmium. It's typically the inorganic arsenic that has the worst effects on human health, there was not mention of the specific form of arsenic, just total concentrations.

https://dcnanature.org/sargassum-fertilizer/