Author Topic: Flowering Vanilla Orchid SOLD  (Read 444 times)

fliptop

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Flowering Vanilla Orchid SOLD
« on: April 21, 2024, 07:54:32 AM »
Must go within next week and a half!

Large vine in Bonita Springs--must be picked up/removed

Asking $150

Also some non-fruit tree 1gal Brazilian Rain Trees ($20) and a rare Bauhinia bidentata 5' vine ($200)

No shipping of anything

« Last Edit: April 27, 2024, 04:55:09 PM by fliptop »

ScottR

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Re: Flowering Vanilla Orchid
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2024, 10:51:25 AM »
fliptop, what did you do to get your vanilla plant to flower??

fliptop

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Re: Flowering Vanilla Orchid
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2024, 11:12:04 AM »
ScottR, it's my girlfriend's vine. She said she just waters it and on rare occasions gives it half-strength Miracle-Gro.

D-Grower

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Re: Flowering Vanilla Orchid
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2024, 11:39:09 AM »
Just an interesting story to share. My neighbor had a large vine like that. She went out to pollinate it during the right hours of the day and such. Did it for years and only ever got one bean. One year just for decoration she hung royal purple ribbons around the trellis and all of a sudden set bunches of pods without her attempting to pollinate at that time. She believed the color attracted some sort of pollinators and caused it to set pods otherwise on its own. Worth a shot I figure if you're not getting pods from your own pollination.
Trying to grow it all!

Epicatt2

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Re: Flowering Vanilla Orchid
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2024, 01:05:21 PM »
Hand pollinating of Vanilla is tricky because there is a flap covering the stigmatic cavity which must be lifted up so the pollinia can be inserted. This requires a toothpick and some manual dexterity to succeed with.  The natural pollinator however successfully accomplishes this pollinating feat because it is configured to fit under the column lifting the stigmatic cover and inserting the pollinia as it searches for nectar.

As to getting a Vanilla vine to bloom....  As long as your vanilla vine is growing upwards along a support it generally won't flower.  But when it reaches the top of whatever support it is climbing on and exceeds the support so the that vine begins to hang sideways in the air or even droop a bit then that causes the vine to produce hormones and auxins which make the vine initiate inflorescences and flower buds.

OK — HTH

Paul M.
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Tropical Sunshine

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Re: Flowering Vanilla Orchid
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2024, 12:48:16 PM »
That’s similar to a dragon fruit plant, where when the growth falls over is usually when it wants to begin to flower...
Teach a man to fish, and he will be able to catch fish for life.

Teach a man to nurture plants, and he will be able to eat durian, soursop, mangosteen, papaya, rambutan, and guava fruits for life!

ben mango

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Re: Flowering Vanilla Orchid
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2024, 01:09:42 PM »
That will be a challenge for someone to remove. Such a delicate plant

Epicatt2

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Re: Flowering Vanilla Orchid
« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2024, 01:47:12 AM »
That will be a challenge for someone to remove. Such a delicate plant

To remove the vine may take a while to do without damaging the root system or stressing the vine.

One way would be to wet the roots 'til they turn green, showing that they have abosrbed the water.

Once wet like that, gently roll a root side to side, but gently, 'til it comes loose from the substrate that it's
affixed to.  The object is to save as much of the root system without bruising, breaking, or damaging them.
The roots can be quite brittle so it is important to take time to loosen them slowly and gently while they
are still green with water which does make them slightly less brittle.

Another way to remove the dampened roots is to use a very thin bladed, clean knife and gently slide it
under the roots holding the blade as parallel as possible against the substrate to help loosen the roots
from the substrate.

You will want to work on one root at a time.  This is, true, very time consuming but it is important not
to stress the plant by damaging the roots because this tropical vine needs its root system intact to grow
and thrive in its new situation and it doesn't replace its roots quickly if they are damaged.

OK — HTH

Paul M.
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