Author Topic: Making mamalade  (Read 806 times)

poncirsguy

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 484
    • Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, 6a/6b
    • View Profile
Making mamalade
« on: February 10, 2022, 07:49:31 PM »
I was looking at making freezer marmalade and I was planning to boil it down to a viscus state at a temperature of 176F. This lower temperature greatly reduces the heat destruction of the fruit. The end product has to be frozen instead of canned because the 36F lower temperature will not adequately destroy pathogens. To get my water to boil at 176F I would have to set my canning operation at 24,000 feet above sea level or set up a vacuum pump that would pull 6.87 psi of vacuum. The boiling rate would have to be closely monitored to not over run the vacuum pump. Heat input would have to meet the motor power to pull and maintain the appropriate vacuum needed. I think that the 24,000 foot elevation is unattainable.  Has anyone here ever use a vacuum pump hooked up to an "anti-presure" cooker to control cooking temperature for making marmalade.

Steve

Citradia

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 941
    • USA/NC/Old Fort/6B
    • View Profile
Re: Making mamalade
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2022, 08:19:13 PM »
I donít know about all that temperature and pump stuff, but I have made a lot of marmalade using primarily the Sure Jell recipe, and modified some if poncirus marmalade to process out resins. I have to add 5 minutes to my canning time since I am at 3,000 ft elevation.

Millet

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4564
    • Colorado
    • View Profile
Re: Making mamalade
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2022, 06:38:29 PM »
citradia. got you beat I'm at 5440 elevation.  So how minutes must I add?

Citradia

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 941
    • USA/NC/Old Fort/6B
    • View Profile
Re: Making mamalade
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2022, 08:49:11 PM »
It says on the Sure Jell instructions. 1000 to 3,000 feet adds 5 minutes. From 3,001 to 6,000 ft add 10 minutes.

poncirsguy

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 484
    • Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, 6a/6b
    • View Profile
Re: Making mamalade
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2022, 10:58:47 PM »
Skip the sure jell, climb to the top  of kilamenjaro with you svea stove and cook away.


citrange

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 136
    • UK - 15 miles west of London
    • View Profile
    • Home Citrus growers
Re: Making mamalade
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2022, 09:59:04 AM »
Quote
greatly reduces the heat destruction of the fruit
It may be a fun experiment but otherwise I don't understand why you are trying to do this.
Marmalade tastes good because the fruit has softened and broken down and partially dissolved in the sugar.
This probably wouldn't happen at your high-altitude boiling temperature.
Also, the marmalade sets to a gel or jelly because of the presence of fruit pectin.
I'm pretty certain that this won't happen at low temperatures.
There is a scholarly paper called SETTING TIME AND SETTING TEMPERATURE OF PECTIN JELLIES published in 1960, but you'll have to pay $12 to read it online.

poncirsguy

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 484
    • Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, 6a/6b
    • View Profile
Re: Making mamalade
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2022, 12:34:28 PM »
My wife and I are Prediabetes and limit our sugar and grain input.  The porpoise of low temperature boiling is to remove enough moisture without cooking the fruit to total mush destroying nutrients  This will eliminate the need for sugar and pectin.  The New Zealand lemonade fruits when picked greenish yellow are very tasty with a lower brix level.  Obviously I an not going to set up my operation on top of K2 but could use a vacuum pump to do the cooking.  It should be almost free to do this because any and all inefficiencies will heat the house anyway.  Because of the lower temperature these marmalade containers will have to be frozen not caned.  Picture  below is overly simplified of what must be done.

« Last Edit: February 14, 2022, 12:36:06 PM by poncirsguy »

Yorgos

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 299
    • USA, Houston, Texas USDA zone 9a
    • View Profile
Re: Making mamalade
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2022, 02:28:00 PM »
Skip the sure jell, climb to the top  of kilamenjaro with you svea stove and cook away.

The pic of that svea stove takes me back.  I still have mine from when I bought it to backpack in Big Bend 1973.  Still works. Sounds like a jet engine when its going strong.
Near NRG Stadium, Houston Texas. USDA zone 9a

vall

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 96
    • Treasure Coast
    • View Profile
Re: Making mamalade
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2022, 05:36:49 PM »
If your primary goal is to eliminate sugar -
I have canned kumquat preserves (cut in half, squeeze out seeds) on the stove with no added pectin and half a cup of sugar for 6-7 pints. Might be able to eliminate that entirely for your diet. Kumquats are naturally high in pectin, not sure if NZ lemonade is too but it's worth a trial, I think. After cooking/canning the fruit isn't complete mush and it's a good alternative to jam.
- Val

Citradia

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 941
    • USA/NC/Old Fort/6B
    • View Profile
Re: Making mamalade
« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2022, 10:42:09 PM »
If added sugar is undesirable, Sure Jell makes a pectin additive that is made for without adding sugar. Iíve always done the old fashioned sugar recipe because after all the prep work of making the jelly, I donít want to take a chance of it not setting or being preserved. I know sugar is a natural preservative. To each their own.

BorisR

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 26
    • Crimea, Feodosia, z7
    • View Profile
Re: Making mamalade
« Reply #10 on: February 16, 2022, 02:47:21 AM »
but you'll have to pay $12 to read it online.
link

Am I violating the rules of the forum with this? if so, tell me.

poncirsguy

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 484
    • Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, 6a/6b
    • View Profile
Re: Making mamalade
« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2022, 01:14:21 PM »
The New Zealand Lemonade did not Jell up.  It was thick a sauce. that could be slowly poured.  That is fine with my liking.  Out of my 7 kumquat trees I get enough fruit to count on my fingers and toes and have a toe and finger left over.  No kumquat marmalade here.

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk